NCS Conservation: October Highlights

Posted on 10/8/2019

Here are a few recent conservation highlights.

Numismatic Conservation Services (NCS) uses a variety of proprietary techniques to remove harmful surface contaminants, stabilize and protect a coin's surfaces and, in many cases, improve a coin's eye appeal. After coins are conserved by NCS, they are seamlessly transferred to Numismatic Guaranty Corporation (NGC), an independent affiliate of NCS, for grading and encapsulation.

Below are a few highlights of coins that were conserved by NCS and graded by NGC recently.

After many years in a prominent place in a collection, any coin has the opportunity for residues to form when stored in a holder that is not ideal. The optimum holder for long-term storage is one that is as airtight as possible. In times past, however, such holders were unavailable.

This Great Britain 1897 Proof 2 Sovereign arrived at NCS exhibiting a thick hazy residue obscuring the coin's original mirrored fields and frosty devices. Expert conservation must be performed to remove the thick opaque residues without causing damage to the surface underneath. This impressive coin was able to grade well with NGC after professional conservation by NCS.

Great Britain 1897 Proof 2 Sovereign
Before conservation
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Great Britain 1897 Proof 2 Sovereign
After conservation
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Some coins develop residues through a mix of time and environmental factors in some unusual ways. This 1981 Hong Kong gold $1,000 issued in honor of the Rooster Lunar Year had been in poor long-term storage holders for some time and it developed a peculiar thick residue. The technicians at NCS utilize specific techniques to address all sorts of issues, including this more-unusual residue. The unattractive residue was able to safely be removed without damaging the underlying surface. Following conservation, this coin was able to grade very well with NGC.

Hong Kong 1981 Gold $1000
Before conservation
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Hong Kong 1981 Gold $1000
After conservation
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Improper storage can leave unsightly blemishes on a coin's surface. This Panama gold 500 Balboa was submitted to NCS to address the streaky cross of residue that had developed across the sailfish due to poor storage. Marks such as this are often the result of a rubber band whose organic nature often permanently damages a coin. Fortunately for this large gold piece, the rubber band had not yet damaged the surface. After careful removal, a coin with bright mirrored fields and frosted devices was revealed. Following skillful conservation work, this Latin American coin was once again looking fresh and graded well in an NGC holder.

Panama 1981 Gold 500 Balboa
Before conservation
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Panama 1981 Gold 500 Balboa
After conservation
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For more information about NCS, visit NGCcoin.com/NCS.


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