NCS Conservation: August Highlights

Posted on 8/13/2019

View this month’s NCS Conservation highlights.

Numismatic Conservation Services (NCS) uses a variety of proprietary techniques to remove harmful surface contaminants, stabilize and protect a coin's surfaces and, in many cases, improve a coin's eye appeal. After coins are conserved by NCS, they are seamlessly transferred to Numismatic Guaranty Corporation (NGC), an independent affiliate of NCS, for grading and encapsulation.

Below are a few highlights of numismatic items that were recently conserved by NCS and graded by NGC.

Less-than-ideal storage schemes in equally inferior holders can lead to the development of many residues. This Great Britain 1985 Proof 5 Sovereign was submitted to NCS to remove a streaky yellowing haze across both sides. Thick residues such as these can develop even on modern coins over time with exposure to environmental contaminants when stored in holders that are not airtight. Expert conservation must be performed to remove the discoloration and hazy residues without causing damage to the surface underneath. This large gold coin was able to grade very well with NGC after professional NCS conservation work.

Great Britain 1985 Proof 5 Sovereign
Before conservation
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Great Britain 1985 Proof 5 Sovereign
After conservation
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This 1889 $3 Gold had long suffered from poor surface conditions, likely long before it was the star of a numismatic collection, resulting in thick reddish residue in many crevices of the design. Luckily, conservators at NCS have developed techniques to remove such distracting and potentially harmful residues from the surface of important coins such as this one. After the residue was completely removed and its original color was revealed, this gold piece was able to grade with NGC.

1889 $3 Gold
Before conservation
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1889 $3 Gold
After conservation
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A not-at-all-unusual occurrence with gold coins is the development of small red spots, commonly referred to as copper spots. Modern and vintage gold coins alike can develop these diminutive specks, which can be distracting to the numismatist. This Scalloped Edge 1993 China Gold 100 Yuan was submitted to NCS to remove an abundance of small copper spots. Removing spots such as these can usually be safely performed by the conservators at NCS. Following careful conservation work, this Chinese modern coin was once again looking its best and graded well in an NGC holder.

1993 China Gold 100 Yuan
Before conservation
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1993 China Gold 100 Yuan
After conservation
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For more information about NCS, visit NGCcoin.com/NCS.


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