NCS Conservation Highlights

Posted on 7/9/2019

Here are a few NCS conservation highlights from July.

Numismatic Conservation Services (NCS) uses a variety of proprietary techniques to remove harmful surface contaminants, stabilize and protect a coin's surfaces and, in many cases, improve a coin's eye appeal. After coins are conserved by NCS, they are seamlessly transferred to Numismatic Guaranty Corporation (NGC), an independent affiliate of NCS, for grading and encapsulation.

Below are a few highlights of numismatic items that were recently conserved by NCS and graded by NGC.

This Hard Times token with an anti-slavery message dated 1838 was submitted to NCS to remove a pale green substance from the surfaces. Most likely caused by PVC from long-term storage in less-than-ideal holders, the pale green residue was very noticeable along the rim with other deposits in the fields and high points of the legends. Expert conservation must be performed to remove the discoloration and hazy residues without altering the pleasing brown of the copper token underneath. This very important token was able to grade very well with NGC after professional NCS conservation work.

Hard Times Token
Before conservation
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Hard Times Token
After conservation
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There is no distortion filter on the image of this 1863 Cent. The distortion is physical as the coin is a broadstruck mint error, meaning that it was struck without a collar to keep the metal from expanding outward. Long after being struck, this coin was stored in a coin holder containing PVC, resulting in an overall hazing to the surfaces and pale green deposits mostly along the rims and in spots on the reverse. Careful conservation work must be performed to remove this residue that with time will corrode the surface metal. After the reside was completely removed and the coin's original color revealed, this rare mint error cent was able to grade well with NGC.

1863 Cent
Before conservation
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1863 Cent
After conservation
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Long-term storage in less-than-ideal holders containing PVC allowed such a thick haze to develop on this Proof 1961 Lincoln Memorial Cent that initially it did not even appear to be a Proof strike. Very thick residues and those that are caused by PVC holders are important to remove, especially on modern coins, as these residues can and will cause permanent damage to the surface underneath. Removing residues on a modern coin such as this can be tricky, as it is important to not damage the underlying surface while removing the detrimental residue. After skillful residue removal, this proof Lincoln Cent is bright and able to grade very well with NGC.

1961 Lincoln Memorial Cent
Before conservation
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1961 Lincoln Memorial Cent
After conservation
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For more information about NCS, visit NGCcoin.com/NCS.


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