NCS Conservation: June Highlights

Posted on 6/11/2019

Here are a few recent coins conserved by NCS.

Numismatic Conservation Services (NCS) uses a variety of proprietary techniques to remove harmful surface contaminants, stabilize and protect a coin's surfaces and, in many cases, improve a coin's eye appeal. After coins are conserved by NCS, they are seamlessly transferred to Numismatic Guaranty Corporation (NGC), an independent affiliate of NCS, for grading and encapsulation.

Below are a few highlights of coins that were recently conserved by NCS and graded by NGC.

This Proof 1936 Nickel recently came to NCS with some unattractive spotty brown discolorations and hazy residues from the brilliant surfaces. Light brown residues and toning shown below are frequently seen on nickel coins. Professional conservation must be performed to remove the discoloration and hazy residue without damaging the brilliant Proof surface underneath. This nickel was able to grade very well after professional NCS conservation work.

1936 5C Proof
Before conservation
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1936 5C Proof
After conservation
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This 1901-S Morgan Dollar came to NCS to address minor PVC residue development and an overall dull mauve toning. It is imperative to remove PVC residues as they can be corrosive to the surface metal, in addition to just plain unattractive. This coin is showing a very early PVC residue development in the form of streaky haze with a slightly frosty green hue, particularly around the date. Careful conservation work is required to remove ugly and potentially damaging residues as well as the dull tone, without causing irreversible damage to the surface metal. This coin was able to grade well with NGC.

1901-S Morgan Dollar
Before conservation
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1901-S Morgan Dollar
After conservation
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Many years of improper long-term storage left this 1918-S Walking Liberty Half Dollar in a sad state with thick rusty red residue so pervasive that many of design details are obscured. Even though the coin is circulated, removal of the residue is pressing. When residues have developed to such an advanced state as what we see on this Walking Liberty Half Dollar, there is always a question of what the coin will look like underneath. The residues on this half dollar fortunately had only minimal permanent impact on the surface metal. After successfully residue removal by the professional conservators at NCS, the coin was able to grade numerically with NGC.

1918-S Walking Liberty Half Dollar
Before conservation
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1918-S Walking Liberty Half Dollar
After conservation
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For more information about NCS, visit NGCcoin.com/NCS.


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