Post your most recent acquisition: US
51 51

19,251 posts in this topic

16 posts

Some background on your Saint Gaudens medal.

Saint-Gaudens, who served as an advisor for the Chicago World’s Columbian Exposition sculptural program, accepted the commission for the official award medal. He had completed his design for the medal by the time of the fair’s closing in November 1893. His design for the obverse met ready acceptance. It shows Columbus making landfall in the Americas. At the lower right are three male figures, one bearing an unfurling banner, and above them are the symbolic Pillars of Hercules with the three Spanish caravels and the inscription plvs vltra. His concept for the reverse, however—a nude male youth representing the Spirit of America—was deemed improper by United States Senate Quadro-Centennial Committee. Two variant designs with the figure’s genitals covered and a third with a wreath-encircled eagle and inscription were also rejected. In the end, Saint-Gaudens’s obverse was muled with a design for the reverse by Charles E. Barber, longtime chief engraver at the United States Mint. One of those original discarded medals with the nude boy on reverse sold several years ago at Stacks and Bowers auctions for $45,000. I am painfully aware because I was the losing underbid.

The reverse of the final minted version features a central tablet with an inscription and a space for a drop-in die with the name of the recipient. The tablet is flanked by flaming torches symbolizing light or intelligence, and below it the Santa Maria appears at full sail. Above, two winged (and ironically bare-breasted) females hold symbolic attributes—a trumpet and laurel wreaths and a stylus and a blank tablet—that celebrate the award recipient. The hubs and dies for the medal were produced at the United States Mint in Philadelphia and farmed out for striking to the Scoville Manufacturing Company of Waterbury, Connecticut. The medal was finally awarded to recipients in 1896. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
16 posts

One more thing on the Saint Gaudens medal. I collect medals from the 1893 World's Columbian Exposition. There are several hundred different medals from that fair designed by either U.S. or European engravers. The year 1492 in roman numerals on these medals were routinely represented three different ways depending on the designer: MCCCCXCII (Most Common); MDCCCXCII, and; MCCCX(backwards C)II. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
441 posts
On 9/13/2020 at 7:05 PM, Quintus Arrius said:

One more reason why I love old coins.  Look at the strength and definition of those fonts!  The computer-generated devices on today's coins look weak and malnourished in comparison.  Nice catch, Alex!

Just for you Quintus:  Here's one I bought today at a cost I will not say.  I do so love that Rebel Gold.

 

PCGS_AU55_D.jpg

PCGS_AU55.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
749 posts
1 hour ago, Alex in PA. said:

Just for you Quintus:  Here's one I bought today at a cost I will not say.  I do so love that Rebel Gold.

 

PCGS_AU55_D.jpg

PCGS_AU55.jpg

With Lincoln on the campaign trail and rumors of a Civil War running rife, government men were busy pounding out these gorgeous, well-struck gems. Nice catch, Alex!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
132 posts
On 9/22/2020 at 10:34 AM, kenlee47 said:

Nice coins Iceman!! :applause:

Thank you .....:bigsmile:......kenlee47

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
25 posts

Love those Indian Head nics fullhorn (thumbsu

Edited by scopru

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
34 posts

Being born and raised in Alabama, I thought it fitting that one of my nicer coin purchases be an Alabama commemorative. Happy to bring one of the better examples to it’s state of reference. 

704D9F90-481B-4190-BA96-854B3676ECF1.jpeg

E7324BAA-B96E-4864-BFCE-E8E41C5B3E3A.jpeg

9F3D9A5B-C00E-4FFE-9D3D-AE0DD606E09C.jpeg

Edited by Woods020

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
51 51