New book: "Fads, Fakes & Foibles" now available.
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22 posts in this topic

 Congratulations Roger.  I will look forward to checking it out.  

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Posted (edited)

There's more detail in a thread on the Coin Marketplace forum.

Also, if you want an autographed copy just ask when ordering. It's free. (Signing several cases of books tomorrow morning.)

Edited by RWB
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When I ordered mine all they had were autographed ones.  I accidently tried to order a non-autographed one at first and it wouldn't let me check out  because it said they were out of stock.  So I ordered the autographed one and it went right through.

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27 minutes ago, Conder101 said:

When I ordered mine all they had were autographed ones.  I accidently tried to order a non-autographed one at first and it wouldn't let me check out  because it said they were out of stock.  So I ordered the autographed one and it went right through.

Your book with autograph was shipped at 9am this morning.

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The press release posted on the Coin Market Place has more information on the chapters and subjects.

Anyone with non-sales questions should ask them here, so that all can benefit.

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  • Member: Seasoned Veteran

I got to see a preview of this book awhile back, and I've just ordered my copy.

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Posted (edited)

Comment from noted numismatist Ken Bressett:

Wow! What a tour de force. My head is still spinning from trying to absorb the research and detailed
accounts you have presented to weave this into an absorbing story of these occurrences. What keeps running
through my mind is how similar things were in Washington 175 years ago as compared with today. That
history repeats itself is a truism that should never be forgotten. That seems to be true whether on a
numismatic, or international level. I can only hope that Mint officials, and participants in the current
Monetary Affairs committees take time to read and reflect on these things.

The scope and purpose of this work is well defined and accomplished. The various chapters blend well
together and form an interesting account of the skullduggery and ignorance of the cast of characters. The
detailed information given about Patterns, Trial Pieces, and Novodels, provides much new and important
information for the numismatic community. I find the text commendable in every way and cannot think of
anything that would improve or enhance it.

Edited by RWB
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Posted (edited)

Another nice comment from a reader ---

Hi!
Your incredible book arrived today. I don't know how you do it.....its awesome. Love all the photos, illustrations and letters. Soooo much interesting information. It jams my head up thinking of what you had to do researching and finding all the supporting data.

:)

Edited by RWB
corret spelling
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Posted (edited)
7 hours ago, Just Bob said:

Has anyone posted this announcement ATS? 

I haven't looked. OK with me if you want to do it. (I'm not allowed. Was a Baaaad Boy and told the truth, so they kicked me out...)

Edited by RWB
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3 hours ago, RWB said:

I haven't looked. OK with me if you want to do it. (I'm not allowed. Was a Baaaad Boy and told the truth, so they kicked me out...)

I'm not a member over there, but I lurk once or twice a week. Hopefully, someone who is a member both places will get the word out.

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12 hours ago, RWB said:

I haven't looked. OK with me if you want to do it. (I'm not allowed. Was a Baaaad Boy and told the truth, so they kicked me out...)

Truth and discussion boards frequently are incompatible.  

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Here are the chapter titles and abstracts:

  • Dr. Barclay's Experimental Coinage ~ 1832-1876 -- James T. Barclay's experiments at the Philadelphia Mint are mentioned in many coin collectors' books but rarely explained.  Who was this enigmatic experimenter and what did he accomplish?
  • Donuts to Dollars ~ 1849-1854 -- An excess of California gold and a shortage of silver encouraged experiments with America's annular gold dollar and half dollar patterns.
  • Examination of Counterfeit or Debased Coins ~ 1860 (by Jacob R. Eckfeldt, William E. Dubois and James B. Longacre) -- During and after Dr. Barclay's experiments at the Philadelphia Mint, it was claimed his ideas were not original and had no influence on Mint experiments.  Yet his exposition of problems with adulterated coinage evidently inspired internal examination.
  • Ring Around the Dollar - A Device to Reduce Abrasion ~ 1867 -- Ignatius Sargent and J. S. Getchell assured the mint director that a metal ring would protect gold and silver coins from abrasion.  After all, it worded for wooden buttons.
  • Wharton's Folly ~ 1864-1870 -- The Civil War era economy required an unusual decision for United States coinage: should small change be made of high value precious metal, or nearly worthless base alloy?  Nickel mine owner Joseph Wharton eagerly promoted his opinion to the Mint Bureau.
  • Prevention of a Fraud Upon Our Gold Coins ~ 1873 (by William E. Dubois) -- Mint Assayer William Dubois examined adulteration of gold coins by filling with platinum.  His report discussed detection methods and suggested that thinner coins could reduce the frequency of this fraud.
  • International Coinage ~ 1865-1868 -- From the 1860s through the 1880s, multiple international conferences were held with the goal of rationalizing financial exchanges. This section introduces coin collectors to the purposes for and outcomes of the discussions.
  • The Holey Money of Hall and Johnson ~ 1866-1885 -- Could cutting holes in small denomination coins help alleviate financial inconvenience and loss for much of the working population?  Edwin Hall and Eastman Johnson thought they had the answer.
  • Bickford-Dunning Gold Exchange Coin ~ 1874-1877 -- Recent research proves that most of the design and promotion of Dana Bickford's International $10 pattern coin was performed by former New York Assay Office Superintendent George F. Dunning.
  • Louis Garnett, Wheeler Hubbell, and the Goloid Fiasco ~ 1878-1882 -- Goloid and metric coinage alloy patterns are among the most popular and common of all pieces struck as proposed coinage.  The entire episode was expensive, disruptive, wasteful and useless.
  • The Cometallic Money Plan ~ 1885-1886 -- Nicholas Veeder was convinced his cometallic money plan would make the word a financial utopia.  Few others were similarly persuaded.
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2 hours ago, Conder101 said:

My copy arrived yesterday, haven't started it yet, but was pleasantly surprised to find it was hardbound.  At the price I was expecting a softbound book.

I prefer hardcover for 8.5x11-in books. This one has a good "feel" to it. Books that are approx 6x9-in are usually soft cover - largely because the cover boards add too much bulk.

Edited by RWB
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