Metallurgy?
1 1

10 posts in this topic

I just started getting interested in coins after a bad motor vehicle accident  1 year ago. if I submit a coin for grading, is the composition of the coin taken into account during the grading process? the reason I ask is because I have a couple of 1943 nickels, and I am wondering if they are the true nickel ones that may have slipped through the minting process. You see, I don't have the money for a metallurgy test per coin. I joined this company as I have coins that I don't know the value of, or their classification. I am dealing with some brain damage from my accident and am a slow learner and retainer of info. I am still trying to learn how to take good photos In fact I have a 1963 Franklin that I am curious about. Am I seeing what is called doubling on the reverse and does this coin have a RPM?

more1963dblingmint.JPG

1963franklindbl.JPG

uniteddbl.JPG

63franklindoublingmintmark.JPG

Link to post
Share on other sites

Well I dont know the value but definitely looks like some doubling going on. Sorry to hear about the accident. Seems like a nice error coin and glad you are taking interest in your coins. Hopefully you can get better information than I can give.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Welcome to the forum, first on the nickels I suggest that you weigh them as that is the first step to checking for an off metal coin.  Once you have that info you can compare to the known weight for a 1943 Nickel, I would expect that the weight will be in the ballpark for a normal 1943.  As far as I know NGC does not do any metallurgy analysis but I cannot say for sure on that.

Second the 63-D looks like just the common worthless strike doubling from your photos, however you can also check on Variety Vista VV Link and the VarietyPlus here at NGC NGC Link to see if your coin matches any of the known DDO or RPM's listed on those resources.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Member: Seasoned Veteran

The half dollar does simply just strike doubling, so it's not a variety.

The difference is appearance between the copper-nickel and copper-silver-manganese compositions is striking enough than someone familiar with the coins would be able to tell visually without requiring further testing. The only time a question would arise is when a planchet intended for some foreign coin was employed. This is a possibility, as the U. S. Mints struck quite a variety of coins for other countries during WWII.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Call the coin shops in your area and ask if they have a metal composition tester and if they charge to use it, my local dealer had one, looks like a hair dryer, told us what my fake coin was, good luck.

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 5/8/2021 at 10:23 PM, Coinbuf said:

Welcome to the forum, first on the nickels I suggest that you weigh them as that is the first step to checking for an off metal coin.  Once you have that info you can compare to the known weight for a 1943 Nickel, I would expect that the weight will be in the ballpark for a normal 1943.  As far as I know NGC does not do any metallurgy analysis but I cannot say for sure on that.

Second the 63-D looks like just the common worthless strike doubling from your photos, however you can also check on Variety Vista VV Link and the VarietyPlus here at NGC NGC Link to see if your coin matches any of the known DDO or RPM's listed on those resources.

 

On 5/9/2021 at 8:00 AM, DWLange said:

The half dollar does simply just strike doubling, so it's not a variety.

The difference is appearance between the copper-nickel and copper-silver-manganese compositions is striking enough than someone familiar with the coins would be able to tell visually without requiring further testing. The only time a question would arise is when a planchet intended for some foreign coin was employed. This is a possibility, as the U. S. Mints struck quite a variety of coins for other countries during WWII.

So, if I sent the coins in for grading, the experts at NCG could tell me if my 1943 nickels are copper-nickel in composition or copper- silver-manganese ? I live in a very small town that is far from any cities of any good size. I do appreciate your input.

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, 2shea2 said:

 

So, if I sent the coins in for grading, the experts at NCG could tell me if my 1943 nickels are copper-nickel in composition or copper- silver-manganese ? I live in a very small town that is far from any cities of any good size. I do appreciate your input.

If you can please post photos of your nickels, review the sticky at the top of this forum section.  If you can provide nice clear cropped in focus photos of both sides of each coin we may be able to answer your question without you spending and money.   However if you cannot or we are not able to help than I'm quite sure that the folks at NGC will indeed be able to tell you for sure.

Link to post
Share on other sites
9 hours ago, 2shea2 said:

 

So, if I sent the coins in for grading, the experts at NCG could tell me if my 1943 nickels are copper-nickel in composition or copper- silver-manganese ? I live in a very small town that is far from any cities of any good size. I do appreciate your input.

Yes, but it's probably going to cost you $60+ per coin (a little less if you send multiple coins).  AT that price, you'll want to be darn sure that you have something, or you'll just be throwing money away.  While it can happen, the chances of finding of finding an off composition planchet is extremely rare.  Finding multiple?  Well, let's just say that winning the lottery may be easier.  

The handheld XRF used by the Jewelers and "We buy gold" places would be able to determine very quickly if you have the standard 75%Cu25%Ni planchet or the war nickel comp.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Member: Seasoned Veteran

NGC can make that determination, but you would have to include the extra fee for Mint Error service and write on the submission form that it was for "wrong planchet."

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
1 1