1973 Jefferson Nickel Error, Real? Rare?
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6 posts in this topic

Since I always check my pocket change, spotting a coin with "Something is not quite right" has become frustrating.  I understand wear and tear, I understand that most people do not respect all US Currency as being a representative of our great nation, similar to but never equal as our Flag, but still to be treated respectfully.  However, this coin... and forgive my misuse of terms and improper identification of flaws in advance.... seems to have on the "Face" side a very deep stamp and the edge is rolled over plus that line by "In God We Trust";...?  What is that?  On the "Obverse?" it is very weakly stamped with the "A" at the end of America almost running off the edge or into Monticello.

Bottom line;....Are these errors?  Rare?  Or is this just normal excessive wear and tear?

  Please give me your input, constructive criticism greatly appreciated.  I am attaching best expedited photos.719874243_IMG_20210505_014811119(2).thumb.jpg.9b8e04fe07de727344fef16d1c486789.jpg

IMG_20210505_014435741 (2).jpg

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Hello Rick, and welcome to the forum. I don’t see any particular errors on this coin. It just looks very worn and circulated. It’s always hard to determine how PMD or post mint damage occurs to coins and this one has had 48 years of opportunity. The circular line on the obverse could be from a coin rolling machine or maybe another coin was pressed against it? The reverse looks to have taken some hits and scrapes. We will really never know what damaged the coin, but the fact is that there is really nothing special about this one in my opinion. There is always the possibility that someone else may see something that I don’t. 

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Rick,

I began my novice journey in numismatica/numismatics in 2017 after stumbling on a few YouTube videos that helped recall that my Grand Dad had introduced me to coin collecting about 1973. But I never stuck with it.

That being said, the best way to check for errors is to web search whatever coin/currency for that specific coin's "PROOF". And in this case, it is your 1973 Nickle. Best wishes.

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Thanks to all especially the tip about comparing to a proof photo.  After all, if you learn what is real, a fake or error becomes more obvious.  Makes cents (pun intended).

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Lots of scratches and dings due to circulation. The key is understanding the minting and die making process and knowing that your coin could not have left the mint looking like that.  Coins are struck with tons of force that cause the metal to flow.  This gets rid of nearly all the marks left on the planchet. Also, the marks are recessed on the coin, which means the would have to be raised if the were on the die.  That won't happen on a die.  Even if the die breaks or chips during product ion, it won't look like your coin.

Here is a video from the mint.  Learning about the minting process takes time but is well worth it if you want to identify error coins

 

 

 

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On 5/14/2021 at 6:30 AM, Oldhoopster said:

Lots of scratches and dings due to circulation. The key is understanding the minting and die making process and knowing that your coin could not have left the mint looking like that.  Coins are struck with tons of force that cause the metal to flow.  This gets rid of nearly all the marks left on the planchet. Also, the marks are recessed on the coin, which means the would have to be raised if the were on the die.  That won't happen on a die.  Even if the die breaks or chips during product ion, it won't look like your coin.

Here is a video from the mint.  Learning about the minting process takes time but is well worth it if you want to identify error coins

 

 

 

You explained this in a way anyone could understand the process. I have read and been told by several people and I know now, but this was a great explanation. Kudos! 

 

 

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