1970 S IMM?
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11 posts in this topic

22 minutes ago, JT2 said:

Move along nothing here to see

Can you explain? I’m still very new to the collecting world and would like to learn more. 

Edited by Jon Royse
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15 minutes ago, Jon Royse said:

Can you explain? I’m still very new to the collecting world and would like to learn more. 

This is only one older collector's opinion, although a very deeply held one, Jon. The way to "learn more" is to not obsess on minor varieties. I know new collectors are apparently into them, but I cannot fathom why. There is virtually no demand for them in the marketplace.

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23 minutes ago, VKurtB said:

This is only one older collector's opinion, although a very deeply held one, Jon. The way to "learn more" is to not obsess on minor varieties. I know new collectors are apparently into them, but I cannot fathom why. There is virtually no demand for them in the marketplace.

Yeah, I'm learning that the thing that gives oddities value is collectors' collective interest.  So the 1955 DDO, with its dramatic appearance, is very valuable, but various less-common minting/striking errors don't attract any interest, so they aren't valuable.

Yes, I know that that's just supply/demand, and should be obvious, but I kind of thought that sheer rarity itself would drive value to some extent.  But, no.

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2 hours ago, Jon Royse said:

Can you explain? I’m still very new to the collecting world and would like to learn more. 

 

2 hours ago, VKurtB said:

This is only one older collector's opinion, although a very deeply held one, Jon. The way to "learn more" is to not obsess on minor varieties. I know new collectors are apparently into them, but I cannot fathom why. There is virtually no demand for them in the marketplace.

Jon,

VK is absolutly correct. with the way coins have been made since the 60's and the way the dies wear there are a million minor imperfections and some major in the majority of the coinagefloating around these days.  Variety Vista, NGC variety chart, and similar website point these out but there are very few people collecting coins this way these days.  some days these old eyes see these varieties and need an electron microscope to even see the differences.  If you are keeping them for your collection and like them tag them as such on your holder and add them to your collection.  Just do not pay a premium for them from anyone please

Edited by JT2
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  • Member: Seasoned Veteran

Collectors who have come to the hobby via modern mint collector issues that are essentially perfect and exactly alike may be unaware how irregular older coins are in these small details, even those struck as proofs prior to the 1980s. It results in a lot of coins being submitted to NGC as varieties or mint errors that fall well within the limits of normal for the issue.

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3 hours ago, Jon Royse said:

According to Variety Vista the MMS does not match the S mint mark on this 1970 S Jefferson nickel. Anyone have a thought? 

 

 

First good job in checking with VV before you posted, its nice to see some folks are doing some work on their own before just asking.  To answer your question it is very possible that the mm tail took a hit and moved the metal into the shape you see now.

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To explain further, when new collector after new collector comes into the hobby with a, ohhh, let's say "focus" on minor varieties ("focus" because "fetish" has been deemed unnecessarily provocative), either from being overexposed to YouTube videos or other clickbait sources of information, and another "variety finder" has been created, who assiduously adds to the supply of such coins without a corresponding increase in demand for them. Not only does this result in low prices, but in continuing to depress the already low prices further. Demand is king, and supply only counts in comparison with demand. How does demand increase? The cynic in me (most of me) says by writing articles or giving talks at major coin shows.

Edited by VKurtB
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