It's Token Tuesday! Post 'em if you got 'em.
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A.J. McLeod established a large sawmill, turpentine distillery, and stave mill on the Jourdan river north of Bay St, Louis, MS around 1910. His wife, Virginia, and nephew, Norton Hass, continued to operate the mills into the 1950s.

Tokens are known in denominations of 5, 25, and 50 cents, and one dollar. There are, oddly, no 10 cent tokens known to exist.

 

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1 hour ago, VKurtB said:

Could you use the one on the left to get to the thing on the right via the #7 train?

The Unisphere (still extant) yes, but not anymore.  The LIRR has always used tickets, both before the Fair and since, but this was a special issue token which enabled visitors to go directly to the fairgrounds in Queens from Penn Station in Manhattan.

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3 hours ago, Quintus Arrius said:

The Unisphere (still extant) yes, but not anymore.  The LIRR has always used tickets, both before the Fair and since, but this was a special issue token which enabled visitors to go directly to the fairgrounds in Queens from Penn Station in Manhattan.

Yup, last Thanksgiving Day I took the LIRR to the Kennedy Airport connector to get to Gatwick in England. Departed from Penn Station after arriving from Harrisburg by Amtrak. Paper ticket from a vending machine at Penn Station.

 

"...lead us NOT into Penn Station, but deliver us from evil..."

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The subject of my last post, A.J. McLeod, owned a number of mills, stores, and other companies in the Bay St. Louis/Waveland/Kiln area. This is another token from one of his lumber stores in Kiln, MS.

Kiln was known for its lumber, turpentine and charcoal industries. After the forests were depleted, during the Depression, the area was famous for its moonshine production.

 

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Hoghead, JustBob got me started on tokens. This year there should be a lot more shops open, thank goodness. The undiscovered tokens, the possibilities in every 'little ol shop'.--- Figures you'd have a Mr Gatti's token. Lol  --Maybe you can qualify for the virus 'skip a payment' on that token. :) Love this thread!

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11 minutes ago, ronnie stein said:

Hoghead, JustBob got me started on tokens. This year there should be a lot more shops open, thank goodness. The undiscovered tokens, the possibilities in every 'little ol shop'.--- Figures you'd have a Mr Gatti's token. Lol  --Maybe you can qualify for the virus 'skip a payment' on that token. :) Love this thread!

I never thought about collecting them till I got to reading alot of the threads on here. Then got to looking at a few and got to liking them. 

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Franklin Lafayette Riley, Sr. founded his mercantile company in 1867, in the town of Hebron. When the Gulf and Ship Island railroad made plans to come through, he donated land for the right of way, in exchange for the rights to put the depot on his land. He moved his mercantile and bank to the new location, and called the town "New Hebron." His store was the department store of his day, selling food, clothing, farming equipment, school supplies, medicine, etc. He died in February,1907. His son, F.L.Riley Jr., is listed as principle on November 25, 1904. He was a professor and author, and died in 1929, before the date on these paper tokens. It is unknown who was proprietor when these were issued.

The following is a sample of entries from a 1903-04 ledger that was found in one of the Riley warehouses:

W. P. Benson, 1 bridle , $1.50

Will Hutchins, 14 yards calico, $.84

E. M. Riley, 1 U. S. history book, $1.00, 1 grammar school geography book, $1.25, 1 practical arithmetic book, $.70

Emma Berry, 53 bushels of corn, $39.75

J. R. Lane, 1 pr. Pants, $1.75, starch $.05, 1 washpan, $.05

O. M. Armstrong, 1 axe handle $.25

Henry Izard, 1 pr. Ladies shoes, $2.00

Philly Payne, 1 sewing machine, 20.50

L. M. Lane, 1 gun, $5.00

U. S. Berry, 1 well bucket .60, 1 well pulley, .30, 1 bottle turpentine, .10

W. J. Lee, sugar, .50, 1 bottle quinine .15

Baker Sullivan, 12 ½ lbs. bacon, $1.50, 1 plug tobacco, .10

Frank Newsom, 2 horse collars, $3.00

J. J. Berry, a bottle castor oil, .25

D. D. Berry, 21 lbs. cheese @ 15 a pound, $3.15

Fred Garner, 1 barrel of flour, $7.00

 

 

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This token is a bit more modern than most of the ones I have posted so far. Mr. Thomas Wixon founded Wixon & Co. Jewelers in 1966 at 3010 Washington Ave., in Pascagoula, Mississippi. The business is still operating today.

 

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