It's Token Tuesday! Post 'em if you got 'em.
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"Naval Stores" are products produced from the resin of pine trees, such as lubricants, soaps, paints and varnishes, etc. From the mid 1920s to 1940, J.B. Newton (see my second post on page one) owned production facilities in Brooklyn, Wiggins, and the site of this particular business: Carnes, MS.

In addition to the dollar token shown here, tokens were also issued in denominations of 5 cents, 10 cents, 25 cents, 50 cents, and 5 dollars.

 

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When the local bank failed, the Blaine WA City Council, under the direction of Council President Albert Balch and Mayor CV Wilder, allocated non interest bearing municipal warrants as security and issued wooden money against the warrants.

It was 1933, the heart of the Great Depression, and the council used the new wooden money to pay unemployed men to work at newly created city jobs. The businesses in the town accepted the wooden money at face value, redeeming them later with the city government.

The coins were issued in 5, 10, 25 and 50 cents, as well as $1 coins.

Blaine was only the second municipality in the country to issue depression era wooden money. (Tenino WA was first, in 1931.)

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Havn't seen any moderns so here goes. If you were lucky enough to be in the right place at the right time at the old stadium in Indy, these were handed out on the way in. This superb deep cameo prooflike token has been well preserved since around 2005.

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Orvisburg is an obsolete lumber town that was established in 1888. The last of the mills closed in 1927, and the town died out.

 

This view at Orvisburg looks east from the Champion lumber mill, and shows part of the town near the railroad depot. Not a single building is left today at this location.

 

The only denomination listed in either Chatham's Mississippi book, or Terry Trantow's lumber company token book is the 10 cent. Not long ago, Steve Hayden (Civilwartokens.com) listed these other denominations, and I managed to land all but the 50 cent example. 

 

 

 

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Here is a wooden dollar the pillar of your community would never have reason to see much less use.  It is the equivalent of a "food stamp" which can be "purchased" at a booth with the use of an E.B.T. (Electronic Benefit Card" issued by the state and accepted at any of the dozen or so open-air "Farmer's Markets" participating in the green-market program in the five boroughs of New York.  My guess is it is favored in lieu of cash (dangerous to safeguard on the street) and by proprietors who seek to avoid the use of credit/debit card machines and the processing fees exacted in using them.  The three features I should like to point out about these "wooden dollars" are a). If your purchase amounts to $4.75, you will forfeit the quarter due: each dollar clearly states, "No Change Given," b). Five-dollar wooden coins are available as well, and c).  The dimension of the coins, irrespective of denomination, closely approximates if it does does not equal the exact diameter and depth (thickness) of the so-called Ike dollar. SNAP Is a federal program administered by the various states; I would assume a similar arrangement is available in other states.20201027_203856.thumb.jpg.9f3f83b6e1ec04846291cfd4b0dc63b7.jpg

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Lucious Lafayette Lampton and his son-in-law Eugene Wesley Reid opened a general store in Magnolia, Mississippi in 1914. Mr. Lampton passed away in 1924, and Mr. Reid passed in 1939. The store closed the following year.

The store issued tokens in one cent through 50 cents, in brass and aluminum, in at least two varieties. At this time, I only have this one, but I am always on the hunt for others.

The house pictured below belonged to Mr. Lampton, and is still standing.

 

 

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20201104_160828.thumb.jpg.1423a324310dd1809ee52898fe42fb6b.jpg20201104_160828.thumb.jpg.1423a324310dd1809ee52898fe42fb6b.jpg20201104_160924.thumb.jpg.6edf94e8009b07c89ab324bb70fd1f67.jpg20201103_134927.thumb.jpg.2fa3a354fc0f373fcd2296c2d3d5e433.jpg20201103_134927.thumb.jpg.2fa3a354fc0f373fcd2296c2d3d5e433.jpgWith the gentlemanly indulgence of Just Bob, I dedicate the following piece I picked up many many years ago toMAULEMALL who seems to appreciate the more controversial stuff.

***

Re: Statue of Liberty

Reverse:  the legend "Statue of Liberty, NY," and the monument actually more formally known as, Statue of Liberty Enlihhtening the World, encircled by a field of stars which interestingly exceeds fifty in all.  Obverse: the center bears the fact: "Same thickness of copper as the Statue of  Liberty 3/32".

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In 1906, the Bullard brothers built a sawmill south of Savoy, MS, at a point where the Mobile & Ohio RR, and the New Orleans and Northeastern RR, came together and ran only a few feet apart for several miles, before separating again. It was a convenient spot to load and ship their lumber products to many different parts of the country. Below is a picture of the two tracks running side-by-side. The M&O is the one on the left with the train on it; the NO&NE is on the right.

This token is not listed in the Mississippi book. Along with the 10 cent piece that I own, I also know of a 50 cent and a 25 cent token which exist.

 

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On 5/5/2020 at 7:58 AM, Fenntucky Mike said:

Tulip Time Festival - held continuously from 1929 to 2019. Was scheduled to be held May 2 - 10 2020.

And now? - Not. 

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Very cool! I live I. Gand Rapids MI and have never came across one yet. Thanks for sharing. 

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New to this so please understand if I mess it up lol. I started coin collecting going on 2yrs ago now and just fell in love. I came across this Washington tax token and knew nothing about it except that to me it was sweet. I was doing a little research and to my surprise found out that there is little value or intrest  in tokens. It didn't matter to me I didn't fall in love with this hobby for the money. I fell in love because of the history, the craftsmanship, the hunt and the conversations. True die hard numismatics can talk coins all day. I was so happy when I came across this token Tuesday piece and even though it's Wednesday I hope you'll find it in your hearts to understand I just had to post this anyways. So like I said I have here a 1935 CH.180 State of Washington tax token. I've read a few different stories about them and how the US Treasury department wanted to/and did end up putting a stop to the minting of these tokens because they were not being produced Federally but by the States that were using them themselves. Only to turn around and snub their noses at the craftsmanship and work that went into them. I have come to find that there are two type of numismatics the ones who see errors as a flawed piece of junk that they want nothing to do with. I will give them their respect, but it's the ones who can see the beauty in an error and love it even more because it could be one of a kind those are the one's I listen to and soak up as much knowledge as I can. So if anyone knows anything about this token I would love to hear more about it. When I flip it from the obverse to the reverse it flips and shows just like the pictures do. Is that common for these tokens or is it supposed to be like a US coin when flipped?  Or do I possibly have a 180° rotation? Thanks in advance and don't worry I have thick skin I can take honest criticism. 16051498762988239239395499323022.thumb.jpg.b49d818891a73e0ab16c850077c89e5a.jpg16051530550684224429064470468573.thumb.jpg.bd60c77e97823e5501a10e3c3d2f078e.jpg

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28 minutes ago, Markmoney said:

New to this so please understand if I mess it up lol. I started coin collecting going on 2yrs ago now and just fell in love. I came across this Washington tax token and knew nothing about it except that to me it was sweet. I was doing a little research and to my surprise found out that there is little value or intrest  in tokens. It didn't matter to me I didn't fall in love with this hobby for the money. I fell in love because of the history, the craftsmanship, the hunt and the conversations. True die hard numismatics can talk coins all day. I was so happy when I came across this token Tuesday piece and even though it's Wednesday I hope you'll find it in your hearts to understand I just had to post this anyways. So like I said I have here a 1935 CH.180 State of Washington tax token. I've read a few different stories about them and how the US Treasury department wanted to/and did end up putting a stop to the minting of these tokens because they were not being produced Federally but by the States that were using them themselves. Only to turn around and snub their noses at the craftsmanship and work that went into them. I have come to find that there are two type of numismatics the ones who see errors as a flawed piece of junk that they want nothing to do with. I will give them their respect, but it's the ones who can see the beauty in an error and love it even more because it could be one of a kind those are the one's I listen to and soak up as much knowledge as I can. So if anyone knows anything about this token I would love to hear more about it. When I flip it from the obverse to the reverse it flips and shows just like the pictures do. Is that common for these tokens or is it supposed to be like a US coin when flipped?  Or do I possibly have a 180° rotation? Thanks in advance and don't worry I have thick skin I can take honest criticism. 16051498762988239239395499323022.thumb.jpg.b49d818891a73e0ab16c850077c89e5a.jpg16051530550684224429064470468573.thumb.jpg.bd60c77e97823e5501a10e3c3d2f078e.jpg

The cool thing about tax tokens is that, generally speaking, they were minted in huge numbers, and are still common enough to find quite easily and cheaply. They also were created in different materials and varieties. For example, the tokens from Mississippi, my home state, were made in denominations of one cent and five cents, and were minted in aluminum, brass, plastic, and fiber (cardboard.) I have examples of each type in my collection.

To answer your question about obverse/reverse orientation, some were minted coin turn (obverse and reverse opposite, like US coins,) some were minted medal turn (obverse and reverse the same.) It is also quite common to see rotated dies, where the obverse and reverse can be rotated in any direction and to any degree in relation to each other. Since it is common, it normally does not bring any additional premium. 

Keep posting [pictures of your tokens. We enjoy seeing all types.

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44 minutes ago, Markmoney said:

New to this so please understand if I mess it up lol. I started coin collecting going on 2yrs ago now and just fell in love. I came across this Washington tax token and knew nothing about it except that to me it was sweet. I was doing a little research and to my surprise found out that there is little value or intrest  in tokens. It didn't matter to me I didn't fall in love with this hobby for the money. I fell in love because of the history, the craftsmanship, the hunt and the conversations. True die hard numismatics can talk coins all day. I was so happy when I came across this token Tuesday piece and even though it's Wednesday I hope you'll find it in your hearts to understand I just had to post this anyways. So like I said I have here a 1935 CH.180 State of Washington tax token. I've read a few different stories about them and how the US Treasury department wanted to/and did end up putting a stop to the minting of these tokens because they were not being produced Federally but by the States that were using them themselves. Only to turn around and snub their noses at the craftsmanship and work that went into them. I have come to find that there are two type of numismatics the ones who see errors as a flawed piece of junk that they want nothing to do with. I will give them their respect, but it's the ones who can see the beauty in an error and love it even more because it could be one of a kind those are the one's I listen to and soak up as much knowledge as I can. So if anyone knows anything about this token I would love to hear more about it. When I flip it from the obverse to the reverse it flips and shows just like the pictures do. Is that common for these tokens or is it supposed to be like a US coin when flipped?  Or do I possibly have a 180° rotation? Thanks in advance and don't worry I have thick skin I can take honest criticism. 16051498762988239239395499323022.thumb.jpg.b49d818891a73e0ab16c850077c89e5a.jpg16051530550684224429064470468573.thumb.jpg.bd60c77e97823e5501a10e3c3d2f078e.jpg

Sales tax tokens are their own specialty area. The national organization called TAMS is the society that encompasses the specialty.  TAMS stands for “Token and Medal Society” and they meet annually at the ANA August convention. Sometimes at the March show also.

The serious TAMSers can get pretty hard core about them, but they are the “keepers of the flame”.

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3 hours ago, Just Bob said:

The cool thing about tax tokens is that, generally speaking, they were minted in huge numbers, and are still common enough to find quite easily and cheaply. They also were created in different materials and varieties. For example, the tokens from Mississippi, my home state, were made in denominations of one cent and five cents, and were minted in aluminum, brass, plastic, and fiber (cardboard.) I have examples of each type in my collection.

To answer your question about obverse/reverse orientation, some were minted coin turn (obverse and reverse opposite, like US coins,) some were minted medal turn (obverse and reverse the same.) It is also quite common to see rotated dies, where the obverse and reverse can be rotated in any direction and to any degree in relation to each other. Since it is common, it normally does not bring any additional premium. 

Keep posting [pictures of your tokens. We enjoy seeing all types.

Thanks you. Is this a weekly forum then? Or just a once in a while thing that gets thrown in the mix? After learning what I learned today about tokens, cost, availability and coolness I might have opened a different can of worms lol. I could see this becoming a way to branch off into another interesting hobby. 

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3 hours ago, VKurtB said:

Sales tax tokens are their own specialty area. The national organization called TAMS is the society that encompasses the specialty.  TAMS stands for “Token and Medal Society” and they meet annually at the ANA August convention. Sometimes at the March show also.

The serious TAMSers can get pretty hard core about them, but they are the “keepers of the flame”.

Nice to know. I am a member of the ANA. To bad my first year in had to be basically shut down due to the covid-19 pandemic. I plan on renewing anyways, so hopefully I'll be able to check out the die hard TAMSers lol.

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8 hours ago, Markmoney said:

Very cool! I live I. Gand Rapids MI and have never came across one yet. Thanks for sharing. 

Welcome to the forum,

The 51 I see quite often the 50 not as much. Tokens are tons of fun to collect, the only problem is that there ARE tons of them. I had to limit myself to a region (i.e. Allegan county MI) otherwise I'd have buckets of these laying around.

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If you like tax tokens I suggest finding a copy of "United States Tax Tokens And Stamps: A History and Catalog" by Merlin k. Malehorn and Tim Davenport.  Has a lot of information and then a chapter on each state and the associated tax tokens and other items of interest. 

In regards to your tax token - est 60,000,000 mintage and there are 7 major die varieties - the SE in the word "purchase" is the easiest way to tell which variety.  It appears yours is S1B as best I can tell from you picture. 

Washington also has paper tax scrip (est 7,000,000 printed).  Varieties here include front/back right side up as related to each other and front/back upside down as related to each other. 

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6 hours ago, Markmoney said:

Thanks you. Is this a weekly forum then? Or just a once in a while thing that gets thrown in the mix? After learning what I learned today about tokens, cost, availability and coolness I might have opened a different can of worms lol. I could see this becoming a way to branch off into another interesting hobby. 

I started collecting canadian  preconfederation tokens about a year ago. It has become an obsession.😁

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