1946 penny
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I don’t really know what to ask about this  penny. It is shiny Any information would be appreciated.

4C7C32A0-FA3B-426E-997A-9D46DD88F8DF.jpeg

3DDD920B-79B5-4803-BA44-73AA055EDF90.jpeg

59B2FFF3-AE6A-41C0-99F6-E583AEB59D03.jpeg

DC308337-BA3E-404F-BF96-36D9D9BF6170.jpeg

FE223AF1-1911-420A-B0E7-FC8401C27457.jpeg

D4B71287-9B68-499E-B360-2B29CDC1010D.jpeg

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If that is the colour of the coin, it's possible that it has been plated.

What is the weight and is it magnetic.

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1 hour ago, Greenstang said:

If that is the colour of the coin, it's possible that it has been plated.

What is the weight and is it magnetic.

That is the Color. 3.0 grams Not magnetic

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Just now, Jaynh said:

That is the Color. 3.0 grams Not magnetic

I’m just saying it does look a lot like the 1944 experimental

C8B590A6-CB1C-44F2-BB09-0BDF988B1ABC.jpeg

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5 hours ago, Greenstang said:

If that is the colour of the coin, it's possible that it has been plated.

What is the weight and is it magnetic.

Greenstang. I got a private message saying it’s from   The Joshua and Ally Walsh Collection

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The weight of your coin indicates it has no similarities to the 1944 "pattern" other than color. And the 1944 is disputed - it is probably just thicker because of an anomaly with planchet stock, and not a real pattern. There are no 1944 patterns in @RWB book on the subject. You seem to hint that you think your 1946 is a pattern coin, but the war was over and I can think of no reason why the mint would still be experimenting with materials.

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In early 1946 there were still some artillery shell brass being used in the alloy, just to use the stuff up. By mid-year, all was used and the base alloy resumed.

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Recycled shell casing were used  as long as they were available - well into at least 1948. Most of these were 50cal. from domestic training camps. Large artillery shells in Europe were given to local governments so the metal could be used for infrastructure repairs. Naval shells were commonly dumped overboard, and some Asian materials were shipped to Hawaii for recycling. (The stuff was too bulky to use as ballast and there were no local facilities for rolling out the cases.)

Cents were made from the same alloy whether or not shell cases were used. This was about 95% Cu and 4.5% zinc with a trace of tin from May 1942 forward.

The coin pictured might be simply discolored, plated, or struck on a foreign brass planchet. As kbbpll notes, there were no 1944 experimental pieces recorded. Readers should be extremely skeptical about any photos that claim to show correct color - achieving this beyond the experience level of most, even with "auto white balancing" and other things. :)

Edited by RWB

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20 minutes ago, RWB said:

Recycled shell casing were used  as long as they were available - well into at least 1948. Most of these were 50cal. from domestic training camps. Large artillery shells in Europe were given to local governments so the metal could be used for infrastructure repairs. Naval shells were commonly dumped overboard, and some Asian materials were shipped to Hawaii for recycling. (The stuff was too bulky to use as ballast and there were no local facilities for rolling out the cases.)

Cents were made from the same alloy whether or not shell cases were used. This was about 95% Cu and 4.5% zinc with a trace of tin from May 1942 forward.

The coin pictured might be simply discolored, plated, or struck on a foreign brass planchet. As kbbpll notes, there were no 1944 experimental pieces recorded. Readers should be extremely skeptical about any photos that claim to show correct color - achieving this beyond the experience level of most, even with "auto white balancing" and other things. :)

Thanks for all the good info taking the time

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On 11/6/2019 at 3:31 PM, RWB said:

Recycled shell casing were used  as long as they were available - well into at least 1948. Most of these were 50cal. from domestic training camps. Large artillery shells in Europe were given to local governments so the metal could be used for infrastructure repairs. Naval shells were commonly dumped overboard, and some Asian materials were shipped to Hawaii for recycling. (The stuff was too bulky to use as ballast and there were no local facilities for rolling out the cases.)

Cents were made from the same alloy whether or not shell cases were used. This was about 95% Cu and 4.5% zinc with a trace of tin from May 1942 forward.

The coin pictured might be simply discolored, plated, or struck on a foreign brass planchet. As kbbpll notes, there were no 1944 experimental pieces recorded. Readers should be extremely skeptical about any photos that claim to show correct color - achieving this beyond the experience level of most, even with "auto white balancing" and other things. :)

"Auto White Balancing" actually makes coin photos more unreliable in color on anything but blast white coins. Gold and copper/bronze coins will always mess up AWB. Manual white balancing specifically matching your light source is required. Watch anyone setting up a video shoot. They spend time white balancing on a white card, specifically because AWB is so unreliable. Yet most inexperienced coin photographers blindly use AWB, and get strange colors on their non-white coin photos. Manually set your white balance on a CLEAN white card under the lights you'll be shooting with, for best results. If you're using a camera phone, this will require a "fancy" app, not the one that came with the phone/camera.

Edited by VKurtB

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RE: "Auto White Balancing" actually makes coin photos more unreliable in color on anything but blast white coins. Gold and copper/bronze coins will always mess up AWB. Manual white balancing specifically matching your light source is required. Correct. "Auto" most things are not the coin photographer's friend.

Color balancing or white balancing is done with a Kodak 18% gray card. Nothing is placed on the card. Once the white balance is fixed it must remain so unless lights are changed. (Ambient light should be of low intensity, and the subject stage away from colored walls and furniture.)

If the user leaves the 18% gray card in place, it does not matter what color the object placed on the card is - the color will be correct or very close to it. Reflective of a coin will not affect color - only the exposure necessary to reveal detail.

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16 hours ago, VKurtB said:

"Auto White Balancing" actually makes coin photos more unreliable in color on anything but blast white coins. Gold and copper/bronze coins will always mess up AWB. Manual white balancing specifically matching your light source is required. Watch anyone setting up a video shoot. They spend time white balancing on a white card, specifically because AWB is so unreliable. Yet most inexperienced coin photographers blindly use AWB, and get strange colors on their non-white coin photos. Manually set your white balance on a CLEAN white card under the lights you'll be shooting with, for best results. If you're using a camera phone, this will require a "fancy" app, not the one that came with the phone/camera.

Ok nice thank you 

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