1672 Great Britain Silver Coin Information
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Hello,

I was wondering if someone could give me some information on this coin- I did do some searching myself and from what I found, I believe it's a 1672 Great Britain Silver Crown, but what I'm unsure of is to why the one side is painted and if that is original or not.  I inherited a vast coin collection from a relative who just recently passed and the coins has is extensive.  This one however really stood out being quite old and painted however and I thought I would ask someone here if they would know anything about it and it's value.  Any information would be fantastic.  I'm supplying photos.

Bridge-CoinIMG_1607.jpg

Bridge-CoinIMG_1608.jpg

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Since it's painted, and you do not supply weight and diameter, I don't have a way to confirm the denomination or even date. I see devices raised under the reverse paint that do not seem to confirm the paint job, if that makes sense. Even so, taking the denomination claim as accurate, in VG-8 my Krause has it at $175. Krause is not reliable, but it's one thing we have. Maybe someone would pay half that, slightly more, depending. This is not VG-8 for many reasons, and I'd say between the wear, damage, and paint, might retail for $30-35.

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Hi, JKK

Thanks very much for the information!  It's been very overwhelming with the death and finding what he has left for us- this coin and bank note collection in particular!  If you don't mind, I'm going to post a few of the other coins I found and see what you make of those.  At this point, I don't really know what my best course of action is- do I catalog everything and bring it to a coin shop to have appraised?  Do I sign up here and send everything in to be professionally graded and documented?  We're not talking a few coins here, I have thousands and I know that at least all of them are worth more then face value.  A lot of the coins are Canadian as we live in Ontario and I suppose that is what he was most passionate about, but there is also some other world coins available.  Anyway, here is some pics of a few of the coins I took pictures of.  Notably, the first two coins are gold. 

 

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Coin0000Bridge-CoinIMG_1619.jpg

Coin0000Bridge-CoinIMG_1620.jpg

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One per thread would be better, and with anything that's not recognizably Cdn or US, diameter and weight (mm, g) may be the only way we tell the denomination, so if you keep leaving that out, you will limit the help we can offer.

Condolences, of course. I am currently just finishing helping a local friend whose numismatist spouse passed away, and we went through it when my father-in-law left us his coins. The good news is that a lot of people here, me included, love Canadian coins; the RCNA standards different slightly from ANA's, and I am less conversant with them, but that can be adjusted for.

First, make sure you do not thumb any loose coin that you can avoid. You may want to get a bunch of 2x2 plastic flips so that you can put any nice loose coins into protective status. Second, for identification/value basis (knowing that value is a moving target) of the many Canadian pieces, you will want the most current version of the spiral-bound Charlton guide. It is the annual bible of Canadian coinage, with excellent blow-up shots of known variations.

Looking at your coins:

1967 C$20 gold. That's a proof (and the poster child for why you ought not to thumb any of these coins, and must get at least the proofs and such into protection ASAP), Krause says US$1000. Krause is full of baloney, and the coin looks loose with wear and impairment of luster, but it's still at least somewhat special if only for the gold value of just over half an ounce.

1913 C$10 gold. Uncirculated it'd be US$700 in Krause, but a) this is not an unc, and b) same caveat for Krause. But it is nearly half an ounce of gold, so it would probably be bullion value. Some dealers really hate worn gold coins because everyone selling or buying them seems to think the dealer should kiss their nalgas and that it's the big deal of the day for them, when in fact they can't buy well enough to sell well enough to make much money, and they often wish it wouldn't walk in.

I'll try and get to the rest later if no one else does.

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Wow- thanks again- that's fantastic information and much more then what I had before!  As for touching the coins, I did take that into consideration so I'm wearing plastic gloves while handling them.  Also, I just got in 4 coin collector books I ordered on Amazon that accommodate coins up to the size of a silver dollar I guess so it will be better then having the coins loose and possibly getting more worn.  Here is a link to the books if you don't mind looking and asking your opinion whether or not it was a sufficient purchase.  https://outside-affiliatelinksnotallowed.com/y6qrebt8

Again, can't thank you enough with helping me out and letting me pick your brain.  I have 3 more pics with some pics of nickels I took that might interest you as well, or perhaps you could let me know.  Also- I'm going to order that book you suggested right now- thanks for that!

 

CoinCoinIMG_1669.jpg

CoinCoinIMG_1670.jpg

IMG_1671.JPG

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You're very welcome. Think nothing of it--it is nothing that half a dozen other regulars couldn't have just as easily handled, some more effectively than me. We like coins and we like the idea of learning about them. It's refreshing to tell people something and have them believe us. (You cannot imagine how many people post coins they believe to be Very Rare Errors, are told they are not, and then start arguing with us as if they are the first ones ever to have been told they are incorrect.)

I'm not familiar with that album but it seems like it will help you. You may need more than one in order to get it all well organized. There are also boxes you can buy that accommodate 2x2 flips (cardboard/Mylar or plastic), which you may find more space-economical for coins you don't consider as display-worthy.

On your nickels: you see of course the victory reverse nickels, including the earlier tombac brass editions. I am not aware that any nation other than Canada has used tombac brass as a coining alloy, so they are as Canadian as a nice filet of Arctic char (not sure if you get it in the east, but it's a choice dinner in Vancouver, and I lived in Washington 39 years so I've been to BC many times). What's interesting about Canadian nickels, and some other Canadian coins, is that for a while at least they were solid Ni. Probably mined around Sudbury, though Canada probably has more than one big nickel mine. Easy to determine because Ni, like Fe, attracts to a magnet. Cu/Ni does not. I told a dealer in Boise, ID about this and he gave me a skeptical look, then dunked a big magnet into a bucket of Canadian nickels. He came up with a bundle the size of his fist and very heavy. Convinced! Anyway, I think the change occurred in 1982 so if you have a big pile, that's one easy way to sort out the older ones.

Chipping away at your earlier coins, the Chinese copper is upside down on both sides, and there are many variations by provinces, of which few are rare or very valuable, so I'll wait on looking that up. The cash-style coin below it is rotated 45 degrees right (reverse, top pic) and left (obverse, bottom pic). The lack of a weight and diameter make it impossible to say anything except that I think it's Chinese (Japan and Annam and Korea also used this style of coinage at times, so that's not an automatic assumption), late 1800s or early 1900s, probably a 1 cash. That one's nice, but they are very common, unless somehow it's one of the rare variants.

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Again, very interesting and most appreciated information!  I don't collect, so I know hardly anything about coins and what to look for, etc- all the information I get from willing individuals such as yourself is most welcome!  You mentioned Sudbury and the nickel- it just happens that I'm from Sudbury with the 'Big' Nickel monument, it is within a stone throw of where I work!  Great city! - Let me tell you if it wasn't for the mine here, it wouldn't be half as good as it is- the mine has brought a lot of people here years of prosperity!

I ordered the book as you suggested and it should be here, Monday- I'm sure it will help me out a lot with trying to sort the coins according to worth and I can sort them out like such as I really have no interest in keeping the collection for myself.  My brothers and I will want to most likely liquidate the entire collection and split it amongst us- we have other interests. :)

If and when you have time to look up those coins, that would be mighty helpful of you and thank you!  I can tell you're quite knowledgeable on the subject and you like your coins.  Most people, the more they love something, the more they know about it and it's the way it should be!

If there is any particular coins I should be keeping an eye out for, let me know and I'll update you as soon as I find it hopefully!

Thank you!

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My brother just texted me with the photo of this coin- he's at the house with my other brother clearing it out today and found this under my deceased relative's bed.  I guess this is why it's important not to leave anything unturned!  Whatever it is, it's 208 years old and looks pretty interesting! :)  I also mentioned you to them and they wanted me to relay their thanks for helping us out.

 

Crosstown0IMG_1721.jpg

Crosstown0IMG_1722.jpg

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Everyone is very welcome. Think of it as gratitude for all the kindnesses I've experienced up north.

The 1811-M 5 soldi is a piece in the name of Napoleon Bonaparte (of course) as King of Italy. If that were VF (doubtful), Krause lists it for US$14. Dealer might give US$4, on the grounds that anything with Napoleon will attract interest.

Edited by JKK

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Continuing on. 1919 penny, I'd say EF. (The salient difference between RCNA standards and ours, as I understand them, is that ours factor in eye appeal to a degree, whereas RCNA standards focus on does it show the requisite detail for the grade, or does it not. Yours are probably more precise. Anyway, 1919 cent Krauses for US$2.50 in EF; bet US$1 is a more realistic value.

The half dime is date-indistinct to me, though someone more familiar with seated coinage can surely deduce it. Coin World, whose prices are quite high, prices G-4s around US$20. With the damage and wear, US$5 might be reasonable. Nice half dimes are uncommon, and nice uncleaned ones very uncommon, but this one's had a rough go.

The 1939 Jeff, nothing special. Save it if you like reasonably light wear on older US nickels, but I doubt it's worth more than US$0.25. Can't see the reverses on the Buffs, thus can't evaluate them; the 1917 is an older date not very common to find with such clarity, but the coin's overall pitted look detracts.

Your Canadian nickels are interesting but I don't see any of major value. Same for the lone small cent.

It goes without saying that I have zero idea of the C$ market values of the coins, since demand can vary by location. If anything, we probably pay a premium for them down here because they are less old-hat to us. The Charlton guide will give you a full rundown of the RCNA grading criteria, and then you'll know them better than I do (as does, surely, every Canadian collector).

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23 minutes ago, JKK said:


The half dime is date-indistinct to me, though someone more familiar with seated coinage can surely deduce it.

The half dime is an 1853, and it appears to have an "O" mint mark on the reverse.

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Wow, great information!  What did we do prior to the Internet?!  I’ll start plugging away at this and my eldest brother is coming over to help me catalog. We have a bunch of devil head Canadian bills we are going through currently and have completed the $1 and $2 list.  There is still the $5, $10, $20 and $50 piles to go through. Would you want me to make the PDF list available to you?

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Just now, Terminusx said:

Wow, great information!  What did we do prior to the Internet?!  I’ll start plugging away at this and my eldest brother is coming over to help me catalog. We have a bunch of devil head Canadian bills we are going through currently and have completed the $1 and $2 list.  There is still the $5, $10, $20 and $50 piles to go through. Would you want me to make the PDF list available to you?

If you're trying to identify world coins, one great resource is Numista. If you see any you can't find there, though, please post them one per thread with photos of both sides plus weight and diameter. There's also the PCGS World Coin Guide and Paper Money Guide, which can be helpful.

Devil's face dollars are cool. I don't normally collect currency (and am buck-*spoon* ignorant of it) but I have one of those. My favorite Canadian stuff, though, is pre-Confederation provincial stuff (including Newfoundland in its long post-Confederation UK colony days). Upper Canada bank tokens, stuff like that.

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It's really weird how I post things or edit posts, and it never appears in the thread.

Anyway, I edited my earlier post (and it somehow disappeared) to add that if the half dime is in fact a New Orleans mint coin, it is a slightly better date, and should be worth maybe $10, given the rough shape of the coin.

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Thanks for the research ‘Just Bob’. Really appreciated!  I’ll make a note of that. I’m currently cataloging the collection now. Fianally broke them up between Canadian/US  Now, to start date sorting :)

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The Newf is fairly common, but that one's in reasonable shape. Probably worth US$0.25-0.50, be my guess. It always amazes me that the UK hung onto Newfoundland & Labrador longer than they clung to India. Now if you want a coin quagmire, there's your huckleberry. All those princely states and nation states, and much of it either in Devanagari or Perso-Arabic alphabets.

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The half dime IS an 1853 with arrows, but I do not believe it is an O mint coin.  It just has a hit below the word DIME which is making it look like an O.

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