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The 1981, because you only show one side I can assume the reverse is normal is called a MAD (Misaligned Die), which is an error.

The 1998 has what looks like Linear Plating Bubbles which is a form of PMD.

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3 hours ago, Greenstang said:

The 1981, because you only show one side I can assume the reverse is normal is called a MAD (Misaligned Die), which is an error.

The 1998 has what looks like Linear Plating Bubbles which is a form of PMD.

Sorry I couldn't post the back earlier. This is a shot of back and front. Back in the word states the A seems flat not as bold as the other letters and also the .E. and P. The O in one cent also but u have to position it a certain way to see it. And thank you so much for your advice. It's straight forward and simple. Much appreciated. 

IMG_20190718_120400.jpg

IMG_20190718_120313.jpg

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4 hours ago, Greenstang said:

The 1981, because you only show one side I can assume the reverse is normal is called a MAD (Misaligned Die), which is an error.

The 1998 has what looks like Linear Plating Bubbles which is a form of PMD.

Does the 998 in the year  of the 1998 look double to you? And are the plating bubbles done while it is struck or after? Trying to understand?

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Does the 998 in the year  of the 1998 look double to you?

Sorry, not a Doubled Die.

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 And are the plating bubbles done while it is struck or after?

Those would occur after the coin was minted, hence the term PMD (Post Minting Damage). They will eventually expand and break, that's when zinc rot will set in.

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Plating bubbles are a reasult of problems in planchet preperation, the plating is not properly adhering to the zinc substrate.  I don't know if the "bubbles" are present on the planchet f they are formed during the deformation of the planchet during the strike, but I don't believe they form post strike.  I would consider them to be an error caused by a defective planchet.  But since the mint doesn't make the planchets I'm not sure I would call thm a mint error.  And of course since they are so very common they have no premium value.  And of course if the "bubbles" break it does expose the zinc which will lead to zinc rot.

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