1957-d-washington-quarter-reengraved-tailfeathers
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9 posts in this topic

Krazycoinnut   
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I own this very rare Washington quarter variety.

1957-D FS-901 stage B MDS as attributed by Dr. James Wiles.

It grades MS-64 certified by ANACS as first reported.

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casman   
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Awesome coin and as rare as it gets for the Washington varieties.  The one shown in the CPG was misplaced, PCGS pop shows only 2, and one of them, the MS 64 is misattributed.  Thus, your coin is the Finest known example.  Great find, Congrats!!!

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e1cnr   
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I think Casman sold the PCGS example for over $10K, so don't let it go cheap or offer it in a Heritage/GreatCollections/Stacks auction for maximum value when you sell.

 

 

PS,  I have looked at well over 1000 1957-D quarters, trying to find one of those.

Edited by e1cnr

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numisport   
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  • Location: Hoosier State

Not sure just how rare but certainly thousands struck. Obviously hard to find and other denominations suffered worn hubs by 1957 especially Lincoln cents. Experts please reply.

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e1cnr   
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4 hours ago, numisport said:

Not sure just how rare but certainly thousands struck. Obviously hard to find and other denominations suffered worn hubs by 1957 especially Lincoln cents. Experts please reply.

what makes you think thousands were struck? how many quarters an hour/day can one die make ?

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numisport   
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  • Location: Hoosier State

If that week die was re-engraved to strengthen tail feather detail how could it not have struck thousands unless it was pulled due to other problems. In other words why go to trouble of carefully detailing a die and then not use it.

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e1cnr   
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It surely was not re-engraved to strengthen tail detail, but more likely a rogue mint employee having fun.

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DWLange   
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The Philadelphia Mint's engraving department frequently touched up the proof dies to restore details lost to vigorous polishing. These later may have been used to strike currency pieces, but it's truly odd to see on a Denver Mint coin.

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