Walter Breen's Numismatic Legacy
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6 minutes ago, t-arc said:

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          1936       USA     5 cents

             matte proof  PR-60

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Is this what the grading service is saying?

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55 minutes ago, WoodenJefferson said:

Is this what the grading service is saying?

NO THEY ONLY GOT IT FRIDAY!  SORRY I DID NOT CLARIFY THAT.  IT WAS MY NOTATION.

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2 hours ago, RWB said:

Proof coins were struck once using a high pressure medal press. This imparted the full design and other characteristics attributed to US Mint proof coins. (A very few exceptions exist from 1850 forward, but barely enough to count on the fingers of one hand.)

Cool... the things you learn. Thanks. Had a 74WA Dime, reflective AU-ish, I knew was a Proof Strike by the reeding. The Board argument about that devolved into questioning some of the posters' mothers' heritages...

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does anyone in this thread have an opinion on the 1916 nickel that went along with the 1936  (got an email from pcgs saying both coins had been received last night)

 

 

 

$_57.1916.matte.proof.obv (2).jpg

s-l500.1916.unc.rev.jpg

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The coin doesn't look original to me, typical of Great southern's style, you wonder what they are hiding with their large volume.  Same thing with "Centsles".  Poor photography.

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1 hour ago, Nutmeg Coin said:

The coin doesn't look original to me, typical of Great southern's style, you wonder what they are hiding with their large volume.  Same thing with "Centsles".  Poor photography.

As far as I am concerned Way Down South, i.e. “Great Southern” is a great place to shop.  And when buying a raw coin from them, like anywhere else, you just have to be careful.  

Their pictures are sometimes taken at multiple angles giving the coin more depth than it really has.  But overall their pictures a pretty good, based upon my experience.

(I think this coin shows rub on the hip and will come back “58” for that reason.)

Edited by t-arc
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3 hours ago, t-arc said:

does anyone in this thread have an opinion on the 1916 nickel that went along with the 1936  (got an email from pcgs saying both coins had been received last night)

 

 

 

 

I think OP had hoped it was a Poof Strike, because of the inherent hub defect seen on the reverse

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So Roger, EVERYTHING written/taught in the past about two strikes for proofs is incorrect? 

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3 hours ago, Insider said:

So Roger, EVERYTHING written/taught in the past about two strikes for proofs is incorrect? 

For the 1850- approx 1970 period, yes.

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1 hour ago, RWB said:

For the 1850- approx 1970 period, yes.

that PBS video (featuring Fred W!) shows us how the Gold & Platinum Proof coins are almost liquid after two strikes...

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Got a book yesterday by Walter Breen entitled “The minting process, how coins are made and misnamed” published in 1970.  This is a very rare book, one sold for over $150 a few years ago

and an antique book shop in Pennsylvania had the copy I got priced at $165.  I really wanted to read this book as I had been told by others that it was a good read, but was not willing to pay over $160 for it!

All of a sudden the book seller reduced the price on his copy from $165 to $35, so at that point I bought it.  It is over 150 pages and reads well, so looks like I got a good deal here.  Has any one else ever seen

this book?  I did a search for this book and only found one other copy available, at a library in Maryland.

22956649_1.jpg

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2 hours ago, allmine said:

that PBS video (featuring Fred W!) shows us how the Gold & Platinum Proof coins are almost liquid after two strikes...

What do you meant by "almost liquid"? 

Could you post a link to the video? 

Roger states 1850-1970, so gold and platinum proofs would fall outside that range. 

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I've been trying to find it... Fred's prominent in it

yes, outside the date range, but it doesn't say anything about the Proof striking except "two strikes", not like it was a 'new' thing

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18 hours ago, allmine said:

that PBS video (featuring Fred W!) shows us how the Gold & Platinum Proof coins are almost liquid after two strikes...

That was referring to coins AFTER the 1970's. (And the surfaces may take on a liquid appearance but the coins themselves NEVER even come close to becoming "liquid".

 

13 hours ago, allmine said:

but it doesn't say anything about the Proof striking except "two strikes", not like it was a 'new' thing

That is because it has been common belief since at least the 1960's that proofs were struck twice.  In even older works the two strikes mantra was used.  But those were the result of information being pasted on and repeated without verification from the original documents.  Roger has been doing that research in the original mint documents and it turns out that proofs were only struck once but at much greater pressure.  (Just because somethng has been repeated for years doesn't make it true.  And when the evidence arises that show it isn't true, its repetition needs to stop.)

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"That was referring to coins AFTER the 1970's. (And the surfaces may take on a liquid appearance but the coins themselves NEVER even come close to becoming "liquid"."
ya gotta see the video

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I count one stroke and then as much as 4 successive pressure squeezes for the platinum. 

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54 minutes ago, allmine said:

this isn't that video...

Well of course not, but it looks like there is different minting processes for different metals, this one happens to be proof platinum. The proof silver eagles are struck twice with 2 blows, this I know. 

...and the part about the proof coinage turning 'liquid' is horse manure. For a millisecond the surface of a planchet might flow like a liquid but it instantly solidifies. The word 'liquid' in this context is an adjective to describe the devices floating on what appears to be a 'liquid' surface, the mirrored surface.

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3 hours ago, WoodenJefferson said:

...and the part about the proof coinage turning 'liquid' is horse manure. For a millisecond the surface of a planchet might flow like a liquid but it instantly solidifies. The word 'liquid' in this context is an adjective to describe the devices floating on what appears to be a 'liquid' surface, the mirrored surface.

what can I tell you; it's in the video. Ask Fred.

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