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possible overstrike
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17 posts in this topic

Hey all, I am brand new on this forum. I've never had any coin slabbed or graded .

I am an avid metal detectorist and have dug up just over 300 silver coins in the past 5 years.

I have been experimenting with different cameras taking videos of my live digs as well as close up pictures for when I post my finds on various forums.

 

This dime caught my eye when I looked at the close up shots.

I am wondering if I should send it in for grade/clean/opinion?

 

well,

I don't see how to add a photo on here.

yet......

 

Anyway, this is an 1886 dime, and I'm wondering if any of you has seen overstrikes in the 86 series?

for now I'll try to figure out how to put pics on here ....I don't understand the url way.....

attachment.php?attachmentid=374317&stc=1&d=1485486500

 

 

Edited by bobac

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Welcome to the forum!

 

Your coin is not an overstrike. In numismatics, an overstrike is when a coin is struck, and then that coin is struck again with a different design at some later time.

 

What you have is a "Repunched Date", or RPD. The digits of the date were handpunched into the dies, and sometimes the digits were repunched in a slightly different position. For a list of 1886 dime varieties, check here. Yours may match one of them: http://www.seateddimevarieties.com/date_mintmark/1886varpage.htm

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In numismatics, an overstrike is when a coin is struck, and then that coin is struck again with a different design at some later time.

 

Can be overstruck with same design. And technically machine doubling is an overstrike, so not quite later time either.

Edited by mumu

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In numismatics, an overstrike is when a coin is struck, and then that coin is struck again with a different design at some later time.

 

Can be overstruck with same design. And technically machine doubling is an overstrike, so not quite later time either.

 

Machine doubling is definitely not an overstrike.

 

If it were struck twice with the same design, that would be double-struck, not overstruck.

 

See the definition here: https://en.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/overstrike

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In numismatics, an overstrike is when a coin is struck, and then that coin is struck again with a different design at some later time.

 

Can be overstruck with same design. And technically machine doubling is an overstrike, so not quite later time either.

 

Machine doubling is definitely not an overstrike.

 

If it were struck twice with the same design, that would be double-struck, not overstruck.

 

See the definition here: https://en.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/overstrike

 

Not sure I'd consider oxford a numismatic specific source. D-Carrs peace dollars are overstrikes with the same designs. So are certain overdate strikes.

 

Machine doubling technically has earned its own term but it is a specific type of overstrike. A strike on top of another strike, regardless of design is still a strike and then strike over the first strike.

 

 

"In Numismatics overstrike refers to the image on a coin which has been coined more than once. Overstriking is done deliberately when the first strike is unsatisfactory, or accidentally if the blank slips out of place or if the dies judder, resulting in a slight doubling of the design.

 

Sometimes old and worn coins were overstruck with new designs by later rulers. This occurred in the Roman Empire, see sestertius, and also in more modern times. Due to a shortage of silver the mint of George III of Great Britain used Spanish silver dollars in the early 19th century, and overstruck the king's image and legends on them."

 

Edited by mumu

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Maybe I should write a book.

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D-Carrs peace dollars are overstrikes with the same designs. So are certain overdate strikes.

 

Those are not coins and should not be used in a serious numismatic discussion.

 

Machine doubling technically has earned its own term but it is a specific type of overstrike. A strike on top of another strike, regardless of design is still a strike and then strike over the first strike.

 

Machine doubling is not a second strike - it is caused by shearing, twisting, or chatter of the die during the strike. It is not an overstrike.

 

"In Numismatics overstrike refers to the image on a coin which has been coined more than once. Overstriking is done deliberately when the first strike is unsatisfactory, or accidentally if the blank slips out of place or if the dies judder, resulting in a slight doubling of the design.

 

Where is this quote from?

 

Sometimes old and worn coins were overstruck with new designs by later rulers. This occurred in the Roman Empire, see sestertius, and also in more modern times. Due to a shortage of silver the mint of George III of Great Britain used Spanish silver dollars in the early 19th century, and overstruck the king's image and legends on them."

 

Yes, those Roman coins are overstrikes. However, if the second strike is much smaller than the original, then it is a "counterstamp" instead. The George III dollars you mention are counterstamps. This is different than a countermark, which is a privately applied mark (such as a store advertisement).

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[Those are not coins and should not be used in a serious numismatic discussion.

 

 

 

 

So what are they, Frisbees? They certainly are coins. They are not legal tender(sort of) but they are certainly coins.

Edited by mumu

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Maybe I should write a book.

 

I realize that this is a dig at me, but if you are interested, I encourage you to do so. If you are interested, I can relate the process and how I brought my book to Amazon.

 

 

[Those are not coins and should not be used in a serious numismatic discussion.

 

So what are they, Frisbees? They certainly are coins. They are not legal tender(sort of) but they are certainly coins.

 

Frisbees, bullion rounds, fantasy pieces, counterfeits.... call them anything you want except for coins. They are not legal tender, they are not produced by a legitimate/legal/official source, and they are not coins. The terminology associated with those counterfeits has been muddled, the "debate" associated with them has been twisted beyond all reason, and they don't belong in a discussion of numismatic terminology.

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Maybe I should write a book.

 

I realize that this is a dig at me, but if you are interested, I encourage you to do so. If you are interested, I can relate the process and how I brought my book to Amazon.

 

 

[Those are not coins and should not be used in a serious numismatic discussion.

 

So what are they, Frisbees? They certainly are coins. They are not legal tender(sort of) but they are certainly coins.

 

Frisbees, bullion rounds, fantasy pieces, counterfeits.... call them anything you want except for coins. They are not legal tender, they are not produced by a legitimate/legal/official source, and they are not coins. The terminology associated with those counterfeits has been muddled, the "debate" associated with them has been twisted beyond all reason, and they don't belong in a discussion of numismatic terminology.

 

Not all US coins are legal tender. But I used that term first so I wont argue on that front.

 

Should the Franklin Mint stop using the term coin then? And should in turn PCGS stop grading anything from the Franklin mint?

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I realize that this is a dig at me

Not in the way you might think.

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The poor OP asked a simple question, has one total post, and the thread is completely off the rails.

 

The easiest way to post photos here is to upload them to a third-party server such as Photobucket or imgur and embedding the link to the photo In your post.

 

300 silver metal detector finds???? Cool! Anything old/rare?

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The poor OP asked a simple question, has one total post, and the thread is completely off the rails.

 

The easiest way to post photos here is to upload them to a third-party server such as Photobucket or imgur and embedding the link to the photo In your post.

 

300 silver metal detector finds???? Cool! Anything old/rare?

 

Sorry. I was trying to explain to the OP what an overstrike is, and why his is not an overstrike. I will exit this thread unless the OP returns with more questions.

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nice coin

 

it looks like someone already cleaned your coin

 

all of the fine scratches shown in your picture lower value of coin

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As a technical matter, die bounce; aka machine doubling damage; happens when the dies bounce and hit the coin more than once during a single striking. It does not represent a true re-striking of the coin.

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I have posted an Ancient Roman over-strike in the World Coin Forum, and I would love to get some opinions on that thread :wink:

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