RMW Collection of England and Great Britain
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Just sent in for slabbing

 

Here is one ofthe best James II sixpences I have seen, just sent into NGC for slabbing. this piece is lustrous and fully struck, unusual for James II pieces which quite often are weak at the top of the portrait on the obverse, as well as at the corresponding date area of the reverse.

17703.jpg

 

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Just sent in for slabbing

 

Here is one ofthe best James II sixpences I have seen, just sent into NGC for slabbing. this piece is lustrous and fully struck, unusual for James II pieces which quite often are weak at the top of the portrait on the obverse, as well as at the corresponding date area of the reverse.

17703.jpg

 

See more journals by rmw

Very nice. This is my 1686 sixpence which I will be sending to NGC in a couple of weeks. It will be interesting to compare grades.7QJHmz.jpg Edited by Jaggy
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I really like your piece. Good luck with the grading.

Your piece is well struck as well.

the upper silver denominations for 1687 and 1688, usually not so much although there are some.

quite often they are weak at the top of the hair on the obverse and at the corresponding date on the reverse, and some have adjustment marks as well.

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Thanks for the kind words. Let's see what NGC gives both our coins as yours also seems very nice (at least from the obverse).

 

I have been looking at your journals and you clearly have a great collection. I look forward to seeing more. I have only just started sending coins into NGC. We will see how it goes.

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Maybe the picture of the reverse isnt as good, as it is as lustrous in reality as the obverse, but doesnt show up as well in the picture. I dont have quite the handle on the lighting yet for pictures I do myself so they are inconsistent.

I have another twenty coins into NGC right now, one of which is the sixpence. One of the 20 is a PCGS piece I am getting crossgraded into an NGC holder for registry set purposes, and have some more in that category to be done. Unfortunately, and unlike for Us coins, NGC no longer accepts PCGS graded world coins into their registry sets. I dont know why but Im sure it has to do with $

and the difficulty of keeping up with so many releases.

There are a lot of pieces in my collection which not have been highlighted in my journals, which you can view on this website if you are interested. there are quite a number of registry sets I have set up, in both competitive and custom formats, most of which are accompanied by pictures of all or nearly all of the pieces.

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Maybe the picture of the reverse isnt as good, as it is as lustrous in reality as the obverse, but doesnt show up as well in the picture. I dont have quite the handle on the lighting yet for pictures I do myself so they are inconsistent.

I have another twenty coins into NGC right now, one of which is the sixpence. One of the 20 is a PCGS piece I am getting crossgraded into an NGC holder for registry set purposes, and have some more in that category to be done. Unfortunately, and unlike for Us coins, NGC no longer accepts PCGS graded world coins into their registry sets. I dont know why but Im sure it has to do with $

and the difficulty of keeping up with so many releases.

There are a lot of pieces in my collection which not have been highlighted in my journals, which you can view on this website if you are interested. there are quite a number of registry sets I have set up, in both competitive and custom formats, most of which are accompanied by pictures of all or nearly all of the pieces.

 

Photography is tricky and especially if it is through the slab. Most of mine are either photographed raw or I use the vendor's photo if acceptable. The 1686 I did myself and then cropped it in the editor.

 

I haven't started crossgrading any PCGS and not sure I will. Plenty of raw coins to grade first and get into my sets.

 

I did notice that we are competing in a couple of areas. I'm less bothered about the competition aspect but see the sets as a way of identifying where I need/want to upgrade quality.

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If you have the eye,and it seems that you do, raw coins are usually less expensive and of course you don't get into the additional expense of cross grading from one service to another. Its too bad it is this way with world coins unlike US. It appeared that they did allow cross grading of world coins at one time before I got into it but wonder what the change in policy was all about.there are still lots of good raw British coins in the UK and it seems not many like slabbing over there.

I should look at your profile then re competitive sets.and any custom ones you might have as well.

I've tried various things re photography and perhaps one of the issues is to get sufficient light on a slabbed piece but without getting glare off the hard plastic.

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If you have the eye,and it seems that you do, raw coins are usually less expensive and of course you don't get into the additional expense of cross grading from one service to another. Its too bad it is this way with world coins unlike US. It appeared that they did allow cross grading of world coins at one time before I got into it but wonder what the change in policy was all about.there are still lots of good raw British coins in the UK and it seems not many like slabbing over there.

I should look at your profile then re competitive sets.and any custom ones you might have as well.

I've tried various things re photography and perhaps one of the issues is to get sufficient light on a slabbed piece but without getting glare off the hard plastic.

 

I started collecting coins in the 1980s but had a 15 year 'break' when my professional life took precedence. So the bulk of my coins were/are 'raw'. For a number of reasons I decided fairly recently to start having them graded and slabbed and there is still a ways to go. I was unsure how that would go and did not send in my best coins at first. However, I am now pretty confident with the NGC process and plan to get most of my collection graded and slabbed over the next year. That said, I have no problem buying coins in the UK - so long as they are the right coins - and then sending them into NGC.

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I have a similar story as I started in the late 70s, before there were grading agencies, but career took precedence as well. Now I am retired and am plunging in with both feet.

I am finding that over time NGC seems to be most consistent with silver coins, but seem to becoming more conservative with copper and bronze than in the past, particularly when it comes to designating as red vs red brown or brown. I am still trying to figure out gold grading as that is a much softer metal and much more prone to nicks and contact marks.

Best of luck with your better pieces.

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That is pretty good for a coin of that age and James II coins are rare in that kind of condition. That said, I thought your coin was a bit better than an MS62.

 

My 1686 is en-route to NGC as we speak. It should have got there last Monday but the parcel got stuck in a USPS sorting facility for five days. Hopefully, NGC gets it on Monday (and it actually arrives intact) and that I get their grading in the next two weeks or so.

 

I have twenty coins in for grading. Most are Victoria sixpences with a few duplicates. I also have a 1562 sixpence and a 1605 sixpence. The latter will probably make an AU grade while the former might end up with an XF rating. We will see.

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I cant say Im surprised I got an Ms 62 as there is a very slight bit of cabinet friction which can be seen as a darker area or shadow on the lustre on the obverse. It looks to me as if the reverse is closer to true mint state.I think the graders compensated for the friction by the usually good detail on the piece. I don't think that this coin was ever circulated, but did get a bit of friction from long time storage in an old fashioned coin cabinet over the centuries, from sliding slightly back and forth in its slot as the cabinet was opened and closed. Ive seen Ms 63s and the occasional Ms 64 which in the British sense would not be considered to be a true mint state piece. I would have liked to have seen an Ms 63 for this one, but unlike what many people think, grading is not an exact science.

On the other hand, particularly with early milled British pieces, the majority of pieces which might be considered to be true mint state do not have nearly the design detail of this one as the production was primitive, strikes were often incomplete, and the design detail would not be there as a result. And many of those would get a higher grade if there is no friction. I would rather get a piece which has more of the original design detail, which is why I chose this one over some others.

I have a poster child for this idea, my 1663 shilling, graded as AU 58 but has tremendous detail.

 

Good luck with your submissions.

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Jaggy, I just got my sixpence back late this week from NGC. Was graded as Ms 62.

 

Just got my results from NGC. My 1686 was also graded MS62.

 

Fairly happy with the other coins. No horrible surprises.

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