Slabbing Modern Commemoratives
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20 posts in this topic

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I'd like to hear various thoughts as to the value of slabbing modern commemoratives. I see some potential upsides:

 

1) Slabbing might make for better preservation of proof coins?

2) If you don't like the bulky and cheesy US mint boxes, plastic tins, and velvet watch-cases, slabbing allows you to greatly reduce the footprint of your coins. And even when slabs don't save you space, they are less of an eyesore than things like my 1992 Prestige Set with its velvet cover and fake plastic book interior that has not prevented toning.

3) Then there is the controversial argument that a slabbed coin that gets a high grade is worth more. I've read, especially from dealers, that this should not matter, but we all know that if you are not a dealer and the time comes that you wish to sell your coins, a PF70 is going to potentially have a lot more value than a PF68. And regardless of the coin, this value does not generally translate for mint packaged (non-slabbed) coins. Of course, experiences vary.

 

And to counter this, there is, of course, the cost factor in slabbing. That only really applies to the third of my list above because the others are about preservation and preference. Are there other downsides?

 

Lastly, for those of you who like to have your modern commemoratives slabbed, which of the four major slabbing services do you think is the best choice for this particular area of coins, and why?

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If you want slabbed modern commems, buy them that way. They're plentiful, and unless you insist on PR70, they're probably not going to set you back any more than the original issue price, if even that (yes, there are exceptions).

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I don't care for modern commemoratives in slabs at all. It think that they have no character. They are just coins in plastic without the COAs and are of no interest for me. I don't what those coins in certification holders and will not buy them for more than melt.

 

Not all mint packaging is cheesy. I like the velvet boxes for two and three piece commemorative sets, and the wooden boxes the mint issued years ago for four, six, 16 and 32 piece sets were classy. I collected them all except for the 32 piece Atlanta Olympics set, which got to be too pricey.

 

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1. I could not possible store my collection in the mint packaging. I have a pretty large safe and it is full.

The 5 oz Quarters in particular are best, even if not slabbed, taken out of the boxes and put in a long

container. 1/4 of the space.

2. I really do not know who ever looks at their coins when they are in mint packaging. I look at my

slabbed coins every time I add a new one. Easy in 20 coin boxes to pull them up and look.

3. Comm coins not slabbed will only ever bring silver or gold melt on resale in my opinion.

4. Mint packaging get really crappy looking after 30 years of sliding around. I was given some from my

father in-law and the boxes were falling apart from being moved around over the years.

5. Some mint packaging is runing coins. Ike Dollars and cello packaging in the late 50s. (handling of

the cello scratches the coins)

6. You can look up the values of certified coins and have an idea of what you might get.

Not so for raw coins. With raw coins you have to play the "I think those are pretty bad" game.

7. I do like raw coins in dansco albums however.

 

These are my opinions, not based on any realm of fact, just my experience.

 

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Most modern Commems are only going to get a premium for being in a slab of they grade 70. Since anything else is the same, the resale value is unaffected by being raw. I completely understand the convenience, preservation, and display arguments. It's probably more cost effective to sell the originals and buy slabs rather than pay the grading fees.

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I don't care for modern commemoratives in slabs at all. It think that they have no character. They are just coins in plastic without the COAs and are of no interest for me. I don't what those coins in certification holders and will not buy them for more than melt.

 

Not all mint packaging is cheesy. I like the velvet boxes for two and three piece commemorative sets, and the wooden boxes the mint issued years ago for four, six, 16 and 32 piece sets were classy. I collected them all except for the 32 piece Atlanta Olympics set, which got to be too pricey.

I agree pretty much 100%. here

I truly wish the wooden boxes would have been continued. But by all mean, keeping the coins in OGP with the COA is a must (for me)

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The people who like to compete in registry sets need them, whether self-made or bought.

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I don't care for modern commemoratives in slabs at all. It think that they have no character. They are just coins in plastic without the COAs and are of no interest for me. I don't what those coins in certification holders and will not buy them for more than melt.

 

Not all mint packaging is cheesy. I like the velvet boxes for two and three piece commemorative sets, and the wooden boxes the mint issued years ago for four, six, 16 and 32 piece sets were classy. I collected them all except for the 32 piece Atlanta Olympics set, which got to be too pricey.

 

I agree here as well. Those boxes the Buffalo gold came in were VERY nice I thought. In the long run the packaging might very well end up more rare than the coins themselves.

 

jom

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Most modern Commems are only going to get a premium for being in a slab of they grade 70. Since anything else is the same, the resale value is unaffected by being raw. I completely understand the convenience, preservation, and display arguments. It's probably more cost effective to sell the originals and buy slabs rather than pay the grading fees.

 

Yes, that's a very good point. Using that place we all love and hate, eBay, I looked at a couple of examples of proofs I have in mint packaging and priced slabbing them versus selling them as is and buying coins that are already slabbed. If you don't care about getting 70s, it is definitely cheaper to go that latter route. But even if you do want 70s, it is still cheaper to do the sell/buy thing if you are talking about complete sets wherein you may only care about the commemoratives included with regular proof coins.

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I agree here as well. Those boxes the Buffalo gold came in were VERY nice I thought. In the long run the packaging might very well end up more rare than the coins themselves.

jom

 

Yes, the wood boxes, I admit, are classy and fun. But we've all also seen the crappy plastic holders that look awful, so I guess that's more of a case-by-case argument.

 

That's an interesting point about the value in the packaging, akin to how old toys are worth more in original packaging, etc. But I suspect the value in such things won't materialize for generations to come.

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I don't care for modern commemoratives in slabs at all. It think that they have no character. They are just coins in plastic without the COAs and are of no interest for me. I don't what those coins in certification holders and will not buy them for more than melt.

 

Not all mint packaging is cheesy. I like the velvet boxes for two and three piece commemorative sets, and the wooden boxes the mint issued years ago for four, six, 16 and 32 piece sets were classy. I collected them all except for the 32 piece Atlanta Olympics set, which got to be too pricey.

 

I agree here as well. Those boxes the Buffalo gold came in were VERY nice I thought. In the long run the packaging might very well end up more rare than the coins themselves.

 

jom

 

I wish I had bought the four piece buffalo set in the box, but I didn't, and now buying that set in the box is virtually impossible.

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Wish I had a $1 for every time I hear or read buy the coin not the slab. I would be rich. What I wonder is why there are those that say it? Im thinking they think their way is the only way. Just saying

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Wish I had a $1 for every time I hear or read buy the coin not the slab. I would be rich. What I wonder is why there are those that say it? Im thinking they think their way is the only way. Just saying

 

I hear you. You can get a coin in a slab that is better or worse in terms of eye appeal than what the average is for that coin at that grade, and I'm sure that's where most of that comes from, but for those of us who are hobbyists and cannot devote vast amounts of time to the hobby, the slab is best insurance we have. I tend to think of it as the slab does 90% of the work for me in determining value, and the last 10% which determines ultimate value and what I want in my collection is up to me, based on the coin.

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Well, I'm keeping all my mint products in the original packaging with "hopes" all reading this post will send in their proofs, and commemoratives in for grading! Especially the 1971 and 1972 proof sets! I mean, common...$5? Over 40 years old????? Uggh...

 

I do think there's some upside to the 2015 presidential reverse proofs in original packaging, I have two of each as I was lucky enough to order these products after getting kicked off several times from the U.S. mint website when they went on sale. The packaging and presentation is phenomenal with these sets and is something I wouldn't break up! As a whole, collectible for sure!

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Wish I had a $1 for every time I hear or read buy the coin not the slab. I would be rich. What I wonder is why there are those that say it? Im thinking they think their way is the only way. Just saying

 

My opinion was directed toward modern coins. I much prefer modern commemative coins in their mint holders.

 

When it comes to earlier coins, I don't care if the coin is in an NGC or PCGS holder, I buy coins I like. The reason that I want the coins slabbed is because of the financial risk if they don't. I've made thousands of dollars on coins that I have put into holders. I've also lost a thousand or so dollars on coins that didn't. The trouble is collectors have less options than dealers, and I've been on both sides of the table. As a collector and retired dealer I buy certified coins when they are expensive pieces. I can grade with the best of them, but I can't always predict the slab grade on a raw coin. For collectors it's best to buy the coin in the holder you want it to be in.

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There is also anecdotal evidence that modern commemorative coins left in the government packaging have fewer problems with surface contamination than repackaged pieces.

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What I wonder is why there are those that say it? Im thinking they think their way is the only way. Just saying

Well because the other way is "just buy the coin based on what the label says, it doesn't matter what the coin looks like. After all all MS-65 (or whatever grade) are created equal and are interchangeable." If that was true then sight unseen buying would be practical and there would be no such thing as the crackout game.

 

The quote does not say that you shouldn't buy slabbed coins, it says you need to examine the coin yourself and pass on it if it doesn't meet your expectations. Don't just depend on the label. It gets said a lot because there are always new people coming into the hobby that don't realize that you CAN'T just depend on the label.

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Well in most cases you CAN depend on the label. As previous collectors have said here. Most of us dont have the expertise to grade & this helps us to make sure we at least are getting what we pay for

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There is also anecdotal evidence that modern commemorative coins left in the government packaging have fewer problems with surface contamination than repackaged pieces.

 

Do you have a reference for this evidence? I've heard the opposite, and I've certainly experienced some unwanted toning inside some of my mint-sealed packaging.

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I have several sets of Truman, Eisenhower, Kennedy, Johnson, Reagan Chronicle sets that I believe are worth more in the OGP than slabbed, for their historical value including the literature that is enclosed.

The coins are encapsulated in a plastic holder. They are all of the quite low mintage and each set contains a coin as well as a medal. I could be wrong, however. Only time will tell.

Edited by Earl Lannum Jr
added comma after slabbed.

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