An in-depth look at the 1943-1974 Mexican 20 Centavo
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Nice write-up. Thanks.

 

One of the things I like about these coins is that they sometimes come in exquisite Gem condition. As beautiful as these coins are in BU, Gems can be absolutely stunning and have gorgeous toning.

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General Market Notes

 

Mexican coins, in general, aren't the most popular with collectors today. And the few collectors who are interested in Mexico coins seem to be more attracted to the 19th and early 20th century gold and silver denominations like the real, escudo, and peso. This puts the Pyramid of the Sun coin pretty low on the overall desirably scale among the general collectors today.

 

The Pyramid of the Sun coin was produced in large quantities. Nearly 900 million coins were produced in total throughout the entire POTS coin mintage. With such a high production and little overall desirability, most POTS coins have little numismatic value and will sell for less than $1. Only a few years in the best condition have any significant numismatic value.

 

There are many POTS coins currently available at coin shops, numismatic shows, and online auctions. The large majority of these, however, have not survived the years in BU condition, particularly some the earlier dates.

 

Perhaps the hardest date to be found in BU condition, and most valuable, is the 1951. Other early dates that less commonly found still in BU condition include 1943, 1946, and 1952. Later dates of the POTS coin that can be harder to find in BU are 1960, 1968, and 1959. Nevertheless, there are no dates that are impossible to find in BU condition.

 

I believe that the Mexican collector base is a lot larger than most countries, certainly in the top 20 due to demand from US based collectors. It is just small compared to the US because this country is an aberration among all of them.

 

As for this series, though I do not know it specifically, I agree that it is toward the bottom of the preference scale among Mexican coinage but I don't see anything unusual about it. At the same time, unlike my opinion of world moderns generally, financially I believe it will do a lot better than most if TPG becomes the norm by those who collect it. I expect more Mexican-American collectors to prefer it and other Mexican coinage in the future.

 

In a prior article, the Mexican Coin Company mentioned that Mexican coins were popular among (US) collectors in the past (1950's and 1960's). I believe they mentioned or I understood that at least some Mexican modern series were collected by completing folders (presumably Whitman). If this is correct, I suspect this series was one of them and that a decent number of the better grade coins survive as a result of US collecting.

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Wow

 

What an in depth review of these 20 Centavos. I myself perhaps about two years ago switched to full time collecting of Mexican coins after 22 years of U.S. collecting. As you alluded too, it was in fact the real's and the pesos that got me into Mexican coins and I haven't really looked back. U.S. Coins in the grades that I collect are absolutely cost prohibitive now.

 

Anyway, I have branched out to some minors, republic 5 centavos primarily from Zacatecas, Maximilian minors, and a limited few moderns. You were also right that I, as have others, have overlooked these coins. I do not get too far into the 20th century. But after reading your posting it peaked my interest.

 

As a seperate note, the reason I do not get too far into the 20th century with respect to any circulating coinage, is because in my opinion most evolved countries began to debase and bauch there coinage around this time.

 

But the main point of my reply is that I wanted to ask, are you a member of the U.S. Mexican Numismatic Society? They produce a quarterly journal and your write up here would probably be a welcomed article to include. Just a thought.

 

Thanks for sharing.

 

Mike

 

 

Edited by MaximilianMike

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In a prior article, the Mexican Coin Company mentioned that Mexican coins were popular among (US) collectors in the past (1950's and 1960's). I believe they mentioned or I understood that at least some Mexican modern series were collected by completing folders (presumably Whitman). If this is correct, I suspect this series was one of them and that a decent number of the better grade coins survive as a result of US collecting.

 

I believe that I read that somewhere as well. I thought at first it was in the January 1971 issue of Coins Magazine that I referred, but I can't seem to find it there. So it was probably in one of the other books on Mexican coins that I have. Nevertheless, Yates did write in that article that the 20 centavo, "is a rather popular coin numismatically, and is very pleasing in brilliant uncirculated."

 

I'll look again through my books to see where I read that Mexican coins were popular in the 50s and 60s.

 

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But the main point of my reply is that I wanted to ask, are you a member of the U.S. Mexican Numismatic Society? They produce a quarterly journal and your write up here would probably be a welcomed article to include. Just a thought.

 

Not a member. In fact I didn't even know that such an organization existed. I'll definitely check it out though. I mean, really, for the past four years or so, I've been mainly focused on the Roosevelt dime series and just picking up these 20 centavos here and there.

 

I do have a complete set, but less than half of it has been certified by either NGC or PCGS. Many times that I see them for sale already certified, sellers are asking too much money. There's a 1951 NGC MS 64 RB with an asking price of $195 that's been sitting on eBay forever: http://www.ebay.com/itm/1951-MO-Mexico-20-Centavos-NGC-MS-64-RB-/200682474295?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item2eb99b8b37

 

$195 is too much IMO for that coin. Granted, however, the seller has put a "make an offer" option on it now. But I personally don't like to play that "make an offer" game. Many eBay sellers will try to play the high/low game just to squeeze a few more bucks out of you. People try to play that game with everything though. No one ever wants to leave any meat on the bone. Nevertheless, I already have a '51 NGC MS 65 RB, so I don't need that coin anyway.

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Really good post Mr. Smith...A++++++++++++++++ (thumbs u

 

PS I think you helped me figure out the 11 oclock coat of arms on the libertad.....its the type II design

Edited by kmag

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This is actually one of my favorite coins in my 20 centavo collection. It's not the actual coin that I like though. The coin is not in good condition. But rather, I like that it has apparently been in this flip since at least 1965.

 

IMG_6035_zpsal1sxdzt.jpg

 

Apparently it was gifted to a "C.M.C." by a "Clardy" in 1965. And then to a "Robbie Fletcher" in 1978. But I really can't be sure. I don't know any of these people.

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Really good post Mr. Smith...A++++++++++++++++ (thumbs u

 

PS I think you helped me figure out the 11 oclock coat of arms on the libertad.....its the type II design

 

Thanks. Yeah, I just looked at that coat of arms, and I think you're right.

 

On the older style Libertad though, something I noticed a long time ago, was that it also has some similarities to the American Silver Eagle.

 

Screen%20shot%202015-06-14%20at%2012.46.42%20PM_zps681xcatp.png

 

Both feature Liberty on the obverse with her right arm raised and left arm lowered, although this is the way Liberty is generally positioned in depictions (see the Statue of Liberty). And both feature a right-facing eagle with spread wings clutching similar looking objects in their beak...a banner on the ASE and a snake on the MSL. Again, it's not an exact match...but quite similar.

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The website is www.usmex.org if you are interested.

 

Thanks for the website.....i joined (thumbs u

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One of the key dates for this series is the 1959 date. And I just found a 1959 NGC MS 68 RD on eBay if anyone is interested. This coin is top pop 1/1. Here: http://www.ebay.com/itm/321797294033?_trksid=p2055359.m1431.l2649&ssPageName=STRK%3AMEBIDX%3AIT

 

This is not my listing, but thought that anyone interested in the series should check this coin out.

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I have the silver version of this 1946 20 centavos coin.... How is this possible? what would it's worth be??

IMG_1761.jpg

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That appears to be a cast counterfeit in some base metal such as lead.

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Two things, the pyramid on the 20 centavo is not "unfinished", and the illuminated object above the pyramid on the Great Seal is not a "cap".

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On 1/3/2019 at 11:25 PM, Elliott778 said:

I have the silver version of this 1946 20 centavos coin.... How is this possible? what would it's worth be??

IMG_1761.jpg

Sadly, it's worth nothing......definitely a poorly made fake.

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It should be noted that this coin - the pyramid 'veinte' - was a very USEFUL coin until the very, very end..... it was used for pay phone calls for decades after the operator connected calls described above.... until 1975 when it disappeared from circulation.  In addition, small boxes of paraffin matches cost 20 centavos until about 1974.  Those matches were ever-present, absolutely EVERYWHERE... almost everyone's stoves were lit by matches - i.e., had no pilots - and vast numbers of people smoked, .... and there were no "Zippo" lighters sold in Mexico, and before BIC lighters appeared in the mid seventies, absolutely EVERYONE carried the paraffin matches to light stoves, etc....... resulting in the 20 centavo coin being as ever-present as the matches and pay phones.  It was the most common coin from 1943 to 1974.  And all this apart from its beauty. 

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