World Colonial

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About World Colonial

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    I was posting here when you were in diapers.

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  1. World Colonial

    Do you have any show stoppers

    A general thought on your theme. If a "show stopper" is supposed to have any real distinction, it cannot be based upon the price. There are plenty of coins (overwhelmingly US) which are either quite common (very common by my standards) or not actually hard to buy that most collectors cannot afford. The best examples are all of the most widely collected US "key" dates such as the 1893-S Morgan dollar. It might be somewhat hard to buy as an MS in a TPG holder but the wait is still unlikely to be that long. I believe the combined TPG count is between 40 and 50 and PCGS Coin Facts states that a hoard of a few dozen MS were released sometime in the 70's or maybe 80's. From 20th century to date US coinage, as a date/MM, the only coins I would describe as "show stoppers" are the 1913 LHN, some (maybe most) patterns, and the 1927-D and 1933 DE. Patterns are "made rare" or at least "made scarce". At least according to Coin Facts and the TPG counts, all of the other coins should exist in sufficient supply where anyone with the money should be able to buy it, either on demand or at most a few years. Example: The 1933 eagle is one I consider legitimately scarce, but with 37 (apparently) confirmed survivors and its high price tag, I don't see that it will take that long to buy one. Similar idea with proof gold excluding narrow scarcity such as the very low mintage issues listed in the Red Book which are actually patterns or die varieties. For 18th and 19th century US coinage, a lot more but still very low proportionately except in some specific quality, "eye appeal" or die variety but not as a date/MM. Many patterns are rare or at least scarce, but there is nothing unusual about it. Territorial gold and colonials have many legitimate "show stoppers". For world coinage, many will be due to the original mintage. The 1931 South Africa Union 3D, florin and half crown wouldn't be that hard to buy if the mintage was remotely normal, except in grade. Otherwise, scarcity is the result of low survival rates due to geographic isolation, lack of local collecting and in a few instances mass melting. Most of these coins also still almost certainly exist in multiple to what is apparently available due to the much lower price level. In the absence of reliable information, I try to use common sense added to a better quantified benchmark. The example of the pillars I used above to Liberty Seated coinage is one.
  2. World Colonial

    The Queen's collection

    Thanks. One coin you might want to look for is the 1950 proof pattern sovereign, as it isn't a widely known coin. It is listed in the South Africa catalogs but not Krause. Other South Africa coins this coin collection could include that are essentially impossible to buy are the 1931 circulation strike silver and 1926 proof set.
  3. World Colonial

    The Queen's collection

    This is a book I am interested in owning. I'd be curious to know the extent of colonial and commonwealth coinage, especially South Africa. I could also see this collection including the 1934 New Zealand proof set where the recorded mintage is 20 (according to Krause) but only one set is believed to be privately owned.
  4. World Colonial

    Do you have any show stoppers

    An additional short list either from series I have tracked or collected: The 1931 South Africa Union 3D, florin and half crown which have circulation strike mintages of 66, 381 and 791. Unlike US and European coinage where the survival rates would be expected to approach (or exceed) 80%, almost none apparently do. There are a handful of the 3D in the NGC census in low grades but it wouldn't surprise me if one or more are impaired proofs. I have seen this misattribution numerous times. I have seen two florin in 20 years and the NGC census includes one in MS-63. I suspect this coin is a proof though I have only seen an image. For the half crown, the NGC census and my observations total somewhat less than ten. For all three, I suspect the Mitchell collection (not graded and still held by the family) probably has all three (in MS) and I am aware from a second hand account of someone else who acquired a mint set back in 1932. The Bakewell collection (included in the NGC registry) has the half crown but not the others, Remick had none and I have never heard or any other collector where it is public knowledge owning any either. I suspect a low number do but it can't be many. My guess is that the 3D is a Judd R7 (4-12), the florin an R6 (13-30) and the half crown either a low R-6 or very high R-5. Practically all dates in the Chile (mintmark "So") Lion and Castle quarter real 1796-1818 excluding the 1817 (a hoard coin) and the 1818 (occasionally sold). Many dates from other mints are also very difficult to buy with some likely "show stoppers". 1862 Ecuador Capped Bust 4R. It's not a series with a high preference but many Bolivia Republic decimals are very hard to buy and a few might qualify. The 1877 and 1893 Boliviano are two. Others such as the 1864 2C, 1866 1/5 Boliviano, 1873 20c and 20c from 1901-1904 almost never come up for sale. Partly it's likely the low value but maybe not always. The ANS collection has many from this series donated by the Norwebs or donated from others almost a century ago.
  5. World Colonial

    Do you have any show stoppers

    IMO, from a financial aspect, you have made the right decision, The 16-D dime is not scarce at all and it is one of the most overpriced coins on the planet for its numismatic credentials. Unlike most US coins, I actually think the higher grade coins (below the highest TPG grade) are better values than the lowest ones. It's a coin with a high collector preference in one of the most "popular" (as in widely collected) series but concurrently one which I believe has seen its peak and will lose a noticeable proportion of that popularity longer term. With the internet, there is no reason for (prospective) collectors to choose this series (or any of the other most widely collected US) in the same proportion, just as you have with these medals. With the 16-D specifically, I believe the pricing weakness will start with the lowest circulated grades and work its way up. Its so relatively overpriced, it can lose noticeable proportional value, still retain its current key date status and perception while still remaining one of the most overpriced coins in the world.
  6. World Colonial

    Do you have any show stoppers

    In the only coins I regularly buy now which are Bolivia, Guatemala and Peru pillar minors, most of the coins are "show stoppers" in the sense that few come up for sale. It still isn't many but I have seen more graded and ungraded in the last few years than previously and it's a combination of two factors. First, the TPG counts have not increased much at all but more of the few listed have been placed for sale. Second, since early last year, been checking eBay practically every day and found a few lower to average circulated coins that I didn't have before. There are only a few that are likely absolutely rare per the examples you gave but the survival rates are pitifully low and most examples are in poor to awful condition. Purportedly, one 1752 Peru 4R is known from the original mintage of 81. 1766 Peru 1/2 real has a recorded mintage of 163200 but wasn't included in Patterson's mostly complete collection and Brad Yonaka's survey identified only one example out of 939 for all four denominations (versus about 5000 from Mexico). Of the 1/2R, 1R and 2R, approximately 20% were holed. As a point of comparison, I have reviewed Liberty Seated denomination survival estimates in Coin Facts which I consider the best comparison from US coinage. Many are scarce or believed to be scarce but I'd say, excluding 8R vs Seated dollars, these three mints I collect are usually scarcer in multiple than even the scarcest date/MM combinations in a one-to-one comparison most of the time. Also easily scarcer than 1794-1807 comparable US denominations except for outliers such as the 1802 half dime.
  7. World Colonial

    Auction Catalogs

    Primarily keep or try to buy those related to what I collect, such as the Patterson collection sold by Bonham's in 1996. Also have the Millenia Collection and a few of the hardcover Aureo & Calico. Used to get a lot of them from any firms. I dumped most when I moved both in 2011 and last year
  8. World Colonial

    Is this "CAC" thing a load of *spoon* or what?

    Rick Snow is accepted for IHC and Flying Eagle cents though I don't know if he "makes a market" other than as a retail dealer. I can see the same applying for other specialties. Otherwise, not really without supporting bids,
  9. World Colonial

    Is this "CAC" thing a load of *spoon* or what?

    Yes, but the number is not many. Most of these coins are only worth nominal amounts. Exceptions presumably include a few DCAM/UCAM in the higher grades, RD cents in the highest grades and generically the "top pop". As for another sticker, only if backed with offers to buy.
  10. World Colonial

    Is this "CAC" thing a load of *spoon* or what?

    Does anyone know the minimum value cut-off CAC will actually make an offer for a coin? I'm not asking whether they will sticker any coin below a certain value but whether they buy it. As an example, CAC will sticker lower priced MS-66 Mercury dimes which might be worth $50 or somewhat more. I have no idea but seems to me there isn't enough money in lower value coins for CAC to bother making a market in it, except on occasion. My guess is that the coins you listed meet the criteria I am describing; not really worth making a market for CAC.
  11. World Colonial

    Seated Liberty Coinage Sub-types

    Yes, stars obverse half dime and dime belong. I omitted it in error.
  12. World Colonial

    Is this "CAC" thing a load of *spoon* or what?

    From what I read first hand in the 1980's, coins were marketed as "investments" on a large scale starting sometime in the 1970's as a "hedge" against inflation. This is also consistent with the price changes from my Redbooks and charts of the PCGS 3000 index. As an example, common date "UNC" Capped Bust halves are listed at $450 in my 1977 edition (which I owned at the time) which I recall was up from $250 in 1972 and from $75 a few years before that. I might have the dates wrong but the prices and trend I believe are accurate. I don't consider Capped Bust halves "investment" coins either then or now, yet the prices still exploded anyway. I can't tell anyone whether the Red Book represented "retail" at the time but it did in the coin shops I bought from and to my knowledge did for most of the coins most collectors bought. As for conditional rarities (or near it), I have never heard that collectors paid what I consider to be exorbitant (and absurd) prices much before TPG. I have heard anecdotal accounts that it happened on occasion in the 1980's prior to 1986 before PCGS was founded but not otherwise. When I have looked at my Red Books from 1965 and 1967 before the price run-ups, most of the coins in the most widely collected series (even excluding key and semi-key dates) sold for what I would describe as nominal prices. Most, but not all. As an example, I believe common "UNC" SLQ listed for $20 in 1972 (my preferred dealer had one for $60 in 1977). I wouldn't consider this price "low" because the coin isn't remotely scarce and $20 was a meaningful amount. Concurrently, don't believe any "uber grade" but even more common coins would hardly ever sell for a noticeable multiple to the "Red Book" price because communication limitations would have virtually guaranteed that most collectors would never get most of their money back.
  13. World Colonial

    Seated Liberty Coinage Sub-types

    I forgot to mention, I don't consider without drapery "major" either. My "major" types are: No motto and with motto (quarter, half and dollar), arrows and rays (1853 quarter and half), no stars obverse (half dime and dime) and obverse legend (half dime and dime). If I were putting together a type set of one or more Liberty Seated denominations, I wouldn't bother with the rest.
  14. World Colonial

    Early Commemoratives For Life

    There are many collectors who think the coin or series they collect should be worth more. I have seen this implied or explicit claim numerous times since I joined this forum, on other forums occasionally and in the numismatic press regularly. Because if this isn't the claim, what else is it? There are almost certainly at least as many collectors of this series now versus the late 1980's when prices peaked, arguably more due to less financial buying, Those who still collect it presumably "love it" just as much as their predecessors, only at consistently lower prices since the TPG bubble burst. And yes, I do think the coin you posted is a nice one.
  15. World Colonial

    Seated Liberty Coinage Sub-types

    Same as the above post except that I don't consider the years with arrows only as "major". It's a minor design change. Similar to the Type 1 and Type 2 SLQ which I don't consider "major" either.