LINCOLNMAN

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About LINCOLNMAN

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    The Collectinator

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    U.S. Coins, Lincolniana, Art Glass

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  1. A very sensible summary coinman. One thing that I would bet money on (not a lot) at this juncture is that these pieces are not historically significant, which we all thought they were back in the day. They might make for a good story, perhaps already do.
  2. LINCOLNMAN

    Old(er) Gold

    Most collectors who buy gold probably buy gold as type. The spread over melt is much greater for the Liberty $2.50, but PCGS shows 71k graded vs. 205k graded for the $10.00 (common type). I would suppose that the collector demand for each is roughly the same, so the "numismatic spread" is much smaller and might remain about the same as the price of gold fluctuates. I'm only looking at lower MS grades where there is a large supply and I'm ignoring both the downside and the upside of the intrinsic value, but I tend to think of any attractive MS US coin over 100 years old as a good deal for $59.
  3. Great point Mark, worth repeating. I've been gravitating lately towards those coins, tokens and medals, where fine-tuned grading isn't as important. Just sort of happened. Over 60 years of grading controversy and inconsistency may have worn me out.
  4. LINCOLNMAN

    Old(er) Gold

    Continuation of a familiar topic: Heritage Auction last night. $660 for a very decent-looking 1900 $10 in 62. That includes buyer's fee. So, $59 over melt gets you a neat, graded gold coin over 100 years old. I've started a Liberty type set in lower MS grades. Not my focal area but what the heck.
  5. LINCOLNMAN

    Where are all the NGC coins

    That's quite the stash.
  6. LINCOLNMAN

    Where are all the NGC coins

    Capone, I just had NGC grade a 1937 Australian crown that my dad brought back when he served in the Pacific. I did it to help preserve it in the family. Of course a Capital holder would have done as well or better, but it fits in nicely with my other slabs.
  7. I missed this, was it in the article? One thing that we can deduce from the pop reports is that this was an experiment (or experiments) that didn't go anywhere. Not many have been graded and those tend to be in better states of preservation, including many graded as MS. We may never know why they were made or by whom, but it looks like some more sleuthing in England is in order.
  8. LINCOLNMAN

    Where are all the NGC coins

    I don't have much gold, but I agree. In fact, the NGC holder just looks "classier" in general, IMO. I like the baseball card analogy. The one gold coin that I have in PCGS plastic will be crossed when economical.
  9. LINCOLNMAN

    NGC photo

    Looks very nice to me. How does it compare to the coin in your eyes?
  10. It will be interesting to see if there is any change in future prices of these pieces. Goodness knows big money is spent on other "colonial" tokens that were made in Britain as advertising pieces or for collectors.
  11. Denise, I don't think this is a coin, but it does look like an artifact, so it's worth your sleuthing IMO. A spent bullet perhaps? Have fun.
  12. LINCOLNMAN

    Where are all the NGC coins

    Looking at auction results for scarcer coins IMO supports the statement that quality still speaks for itself.
  13. LINCOLNMAN

    Mickey Mouse Steamboat Willie

    bsshog40 was nice enough to look it up for you. Your best bet is probably eBay, they seem to have a number of them Otherwise just search the internet, plenty available fro sale. If you are selling, don't expect to get offers at retail (the prices you will find), but it is gold. You can also look up the bullion value of an ounce of gold.
  14. LINCOLNMAN

    If you wanted to clean your coins

    Wish I had bought some of the first year type offered by the Kagins. Alas, delivering papers and mowing lawns didn't pay well enough. Fun thread, thanks for posting.
  15. LINCOLNMAN

    If you wanted to clean your coins

    Ah, the good old days. As a child I used an eraser on many of my coins and dipped the rest. They looked nice in the blue Whitman folders. Never found any rarities to destroy, thank goodness.