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I kinda figured the same thing but what throws me off is how smooth it is. It’s extremely smooth, no roughness whatsoever. And i would think, if that was the case, it would have some type of roughness to it.there is the back side

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Edited by TheFalseIllusion13
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39 minutes ago, TheFalseIllusion13 said:

I kinda figured the same thing but what throws me off is how smooth it is. It’s extremely smooth, no roughness whatsoever. And i would think, if that was the case, it would have some type of roughness to it.there is the back side

E5EFCE37-3634-4F68-9EE9-159E0EC72FC5.jpeg

It really just depends on what they used/ the grit. I've filed rough-cast brass into something with very smooth surfaces and sharp, fine edges. You basically just need to finish the job with a file with a fine grit, or sand paper, or a buffing wheel - or better yet, finish with a polish like Brasso.

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Seems to be post mint defacing to me.  The only plausible mint defect, in my mind" is an under weight, thin planchette with after mint "adjustments".  But... the "Monticello" is well struck.  I say Nickel, Belt Sander, rough abrasion then voila. 

My 2 cents,

 

John

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The fact that there are no rims tell you that it was defaced after the coin left the Mint. If it was any type of striking error, the rims would still be present.

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