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About this journal

If it's related to Hawaii, I will share it with you !

Entries in this journal

Hawaii Five-0 (The Series Continues)

She is an incredibly beautiful and captivating Hawaiian ... She...as in my coin... Sharply struck with hints of light aqua and a sprinkling of gentle rose hues makes this a pulchritudinous example of the 1883 Kingdom of Hawaii quarter dollar. To see old comments for this Journal entry, click here. New comments can be added below.

THN

THN

03/23/2012

Hawaii Five-0 (The Series Teaser)

She is toned and close to perfection ... A wondrously alluring example that is fragmentally and translucently toned in various shades of grayness with exposed glistening silvery shine. To see old comments for this Journal entry, click here. New comments can be added below.

THN

THN

03/23/2012

Means to an End...

I've been collecting and selling coins from my collection as a means to an end .... Rare coin collecting has been a very enjoyable and profitable hobby for me. I have been collecting and reselling rare coins as a means of supplementary support while pursuing each of my academic degrees. I have four conferred academic degrees, so this means to an end has really helped me out. My degrees include (from lowest to highest): AAS in Electronic Technology, BS in Computer Science, MS in Systems Engineering and a PhD in Systems Engineering. At times it was very hard to let go what I collected and cherished. Each time I sold a piece from my collection, I would comfort myself with the idea that I will purchase a similar coin in the future to rebuild my original collection. Lately I have been inquiring about replacing a few of my territorial gold pieces and have been shocked in the increase in value. Yes, the price of gold has increased. But, the rarity of the coins has also boosted their prices. The below scan is of my 1851 "slug" that was once in my collection and was sold to support me in pursuing my MS degree at Johns Hopkins University. This slug has increased over 346% value since I owned it. Its catalog price is hovering at $45,000 level as of today. In 2001, I originally paid $13,000 for this beauty. I read Dr Kagin's book, Private Gold Coins and Patterns of the US (1981) before buying this gold beauty. He placed an R6 rarity (13 - 30 known pieces) and it matches current population reports. An XF40 sold in 2011 for $54,625...yikes! To see old comments for this Journal entry, click here. New comments can be added below.

THN

THN

03/18/2012

I Also Collect Medals ... Sort of...

As most of you know by now, I have a passion for collecting. The beauty, the rarity and the history behind each item collected is my motivation. When individuals visit my home office, one of the first things they see is my medal collection. These medals come in all shapes and sizes, but each has a common theme. My personal goal is to collect eight or less each year. The most I ever collected was ten in one year. Don't get me wrong, I can collect more but it's nice to get them at a "good steady pace". This medal collection shows one facet of my life that provides me balance and focus. I started my collection in 2005. Each medal in my collection is priceless. I will never sell or trade any piece in my collection. You can say they are a part of who I am. These medals are not high dollar items, but there is monetary fee to get them. You really have to be physically and mentally prepared to seek them out. You just can't pick them up on a whim or slap a handful of dollars on the counter to purchase one. When one is handed to you, it really is the greatest feeling in the world!   (...this is my comedic attempt to employ my writing skills, joy of numismatics, and running) To see old comments for this Journal entry, click here. New comments can be added below.

THN

THN

03/16/2012

On a Hawaiian Trip

My mindset is in the land of Aloha...sort of My birthplace is Honolulu, Hawaii. I grew-up on the islands of Oahu and Hawaii (aka Big Island). My career keeps me on the continental US, but I often have vacation trips back "home". In all my trips, I allocate a period of time in which I pursue my Hawaiiana collectable hunts. From coins to documents. I have been advocating the concept to read as much as you can about a coin or coin type, as a mater of fact, anything that is of collectable interest to you. But,on occasions you have to go with your gut feeling... The attached article is about a gut feeling purchase I had. In the end, I donated this item to the Iolani Palace as they did not have an example...It feels good to donate a historical piece in which it can be admired by many. I donated the item in 2010. My article was printed in a newsletter published by the Hawaii State Society of Washington DC. To see old comments for this Journal entry, click here. New comments can be added below.

THN

THN

03/15/2012

Knowledge is Power

I was fortunate to have help in entering the coin collecting hobby... I did collect coins as a child, but it was more of a curiosity than a hobby. While serving in the US Air Force, I was given an opportunity to learn from a few coin dealers in Montana. Montana is a silver state and silver dollars were very plentiful. A Montana coin dealer told me to read up on the subject before buying any coins. After reading the Comprehensive Catalogue and Encyclopedia of U. S. Morgan and Peace Silver Dollars (1977)(several times I have to say), I went back to this dealer and he showed me his silver dollar inventory. He offered to sell me silver dollars at his cost (remember the Gray Sheets?). I cherry picked his inventory and ended up with ten silver dollars. I was keying on luster and strike. Each coin I picked had original mint luster and was well struck. The dealer make a comment that I had a "good eye" in picking out the nice ones for "a beginner". I studied my new silver dollars. Compared them with the "VAM listings". I somehow picked up two 1900 O/CC errors from this dealer. Excited in making a quick profit to purchase more silver dollars, I sold one of my O/CC to another dealer in the same city. I went back to the first dealer and purchased additional silver dollars. By this time I was hooked. Curious in my aptitude and skill in grading silver dollars, I visited additional dealers. They critiqued the grade I assigned. Each dealer was subjective. I started to build-up my confidence in grading silver dollars. Eventually, my silver dollar interest started to focus on proof-like dollars. This is were it gets interesting. I made a trip to Deer Lodge, Montana to see Dean Tavenner's coin shop (this dates me). You have to remember that back then there was no encapsulation of coins. He was eager to share his knowledge with me. I handled and viewed my first proof Morgan silver dollar. He gave me a lesson on proof-like silver dollars. A lesson on toning, grading, etc... I finally purchased several proof-like silver dollars from him after spending several hours in his shop. Eventually, my time in Montana came to an end. I had a new duty station to move to. I really was fortunate in having several coin dealers who took the time to share the coin collecting hobby with me. The picture below is old, but ANACS became the first to grade coins and provide a photo certificate. I had a few silver dollars graded and the results reinforced my silver dollar grading skill set. The certificate's date indicates the time period in which I was stationed in Montana. In closing, I recommend reading as much as you can on the subject or coin type and gain experience in grading raw coins. It will provide additional fun and be highly profitable. Happy cherry picking! Also, remember that a true hobbyist will share their knowledge with you. To see old comments for this Journal entry, click here. New comments can be added below.

THN

THN

03/13/2012

 

Hawaii Statehood Medals!

Did you know that several medals were struck in 1959/1960 to commemorate Hawaii's admission as the 50th state to the Union? As part of Hawaii's admission as the 50th state to the United States of America, several medals were stuck in celebration during the years 1959 (statehood) and 1960 (50th star added to US flag). Many of these medals have low mintage numbers. There are 5 medal design types that expands to 22 variants. Each of these Hawaii statehood medals are also collected in other numismatic specialties such as: so called dollars, so called half-dollars, Alaska Statehood, and statehood medals. These other specialties areas increases the demand and drives the prices higher due to their minuscule mintage numbers. http://coins.www.collectors-society.com/wcm/CoinCustomSetView.aspx?s=9345 To see old comments for this Journal entry, click here. New comments can be added below.

THN

THN

03/11/2012

 

My Best Circulation Find from the Past

The year was 1995. The location was Southern Maryland. The find was ... In May of 1995, I stumbled upon a news article about a woman who unloaded a few coins at a coin shop in Annapolis, Maryland for a whopping $200 a piece. With this news, I rushed to the local bank to purchase a new box of coins. I opened my first roll and started to delicately view each. As I detected something odd with the coin I would place it aside. I looked at each coin with a 10X loupe. It was tedious and my eyes took a beating. To my surprise I found a grouping of these coins. Not having a picture of what I was looking for, I assumed these were the $200 a piece prize. I latter found a picture online and they were an exact match in what I had in my possession. In total, the value of my find was $10,000. What I found were fifty (50) mint state 1995 Doubled Die Obverse Lincoln pennies. To see old comments for this Journal entry, click here. New comments can be added below.

THN

THN

03/08/2012

I Was There!

I see a need for a Ceremony Release designation for coins/medals obtained at an US Mint coin/medal release day ceremony. Why? Because I was there! I was not there 30-days after the fact (designation criteria for Early or First Release labels). I was in attendance to support the celebration of the Star-Spangled Banner Commemorative Coin Release Day ceremony at Fort McHenry National Monument and Historic Shrine in Baltimore Maryland at 11:00 am on the morning of March 5, 2012. The ceremony was both a revisit of my past US history lessons and renewed celebration of our national anthem, the Star-Spangled Banner, as penned by Francis Scott Key as he watched the bombardment of Fort McHenry by the British Royal Navy ships. The ceremony also celebrated the release of the Star-Spangled Banner Commemorative Coins. After the ceremony ended, the US Mint workers began selling these commemorative coins to ceremony attendees. Roughly, 25 minutes before the US Mint internet sales began at noon. I purchased each commemorative coin in person: An uncirculated silver $1, a proof silver $1, an uncirculated gold $5 and a proof gold $5. I also stood in line to get each US Mint COA signed and dated by Daniel Shaver, Chief Counsel of the United States Mint, who officially represented the US Mint at the ceremony. The four signed/dated US Mint COAs authenticates my purchase on March 5, 2012. Mr. Shaver also signed and dated four celebration certificates attesting that I was at the ceremony when I made the coin purchase.(See image below - signatures redacted to prevent forgeries) The next day, I read an article in the Baltimore Sun indicating that the US Mint sold all of its ceremony gold coin inventory within a hour after the ceremony ended. The ceremony gold coin inventory was a mere 16 pieces. As for the ceremony silver coin inventory, the US Mint sold roughly half of its 400 ceremony inventory. Today, I look at my newly acquired Star-Spangled Banner commemorative coin set with pride. I have 2 of the 16 gold coins from the release day ceremony. I also have 2 of the 400 silver coins from the release day ceremony. I have the proper documents authenticating these commemorative coins as ceremony release. More importantly, I was there! I really did attend and experience the Star-Spangled Banner Commemorative Coin Release Day ceremony. So for those seeking Early or First Release designation for the Star-Spangled Banner Commemorative Coins you have 27 days left as of this writing. Also, please visit Fort McHenry National Monument and Historic Shrine within your 27-day deadline period. It should be noted that its estimated that only six 4-coin ceremony release sets could have been assembled. So now the search begins for the owners of the remaining five ceremony release sets. In closing, I have posed the question to NGC in allowing my set to be designated as Ceremony Release. No word from them yet.

THN

THN

03/07/2012