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About this journal

If it's related to Hawaii, I will share it with you !

Entries in this journal

Online Token Catalog

An excellent token catalog website to contribute, learn from or use as reference ... I was web surfing a few weeks ago for online Hawaii token references and found a token catalog website. I booked marked the website for future exploration. Tokens at the website are listed by state. The website also lists tokens by country. How I used it for a reference....In the September 2012 issue of The Numismatist, page 42, article on Hawaii's Railroad Tokens, has a photograph on 1 of 3 known examples of the Kahului Railroad Co. 25c token. The website displays 3 other values in MS condition... Main website http://tokencatalog.com/index.php tiny url to 15c token http://outside-affiliatelinksnotallowed.com/9hbkx5r tiny url to 20c token http://outside-affiliatelinksnotallowed.com/9auhzw5 tiny url to 35c token http://outside-affiliatelinksnotallowed.com/924gesg Kahului Railroad Co. Kalakaua blueprint below was issued in conjunction with the book, Sugar Trains Pictorial, and hangs framed in my home office. To see old comments for this Journal entry, click here. New comments can be added below.

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Original 1998 Liberty Dollar (aka NORFED dollar)

This is related to Hawaii !!! NOTE: You can tell the writing style difference of an author's journal entry  by the subject matter. On one hand you get regurgitation of previously documented information or what one owns. It's OK, but not exciting or groundbreaking. On the other hand you get thought provoking or I did not know this with a dumbfoundedness result. I hope I'm in the later category. Bernard von NotHaus was one of the co-founders of The Hawaiian Mint, which evolved into the Royal Hawaiian Mint, and he got into a heap of trouble with the US Government with his National Organization For the Repeal of the Federal Reserve Act (NORFED) coinage and currency. As a Hawaiiana numismatist, I must cover all numismatic aspects related to the Hawaiian Islands. The original NORFED Liberty dollars is such a coin. It's listed in World Price Guide at the NGC website: https://www.ngccoin.com/price-guide/world/united-states-10-liberty-dollars-x-201-1998-cuid-1075971-duid-1633923 Waifs in Gold Boots, a Microsoft Excel spreadsheet, was created by the Royal Hawaiian Mint to document their issues. This spreadsheet was in the public domain at one point. Anyway, listed in this spreadsheet are three design elements that tell the story of the 1998 NORFED Libery dollar. This is a must have reference for Hawaiiana numismatist. Note the mintage (column J) and other key numismatic information! The image below is a visual of my original research finding. (I used a silver specimen of the 1975 Kamehameha issue with the "EARTH" design) As you can plainly see, the incorporation of design elements to form the original 1998 NORFED Liberty dollar came from previous issues of the The Hawaiian Mint/Royal Hawaiian Mint. This research would make a splendid exhibit, along with the controversy of this first 1998 NORFED issue. I was in a state of dumbfoundedness when I first discovered this and the first to document this find in my personal blog a few years ago. Finally, the mintage of the 1998 Liberty Dollar X# 201 is 150 specimens (which is not documented anywhere , except in  Waifs in Gold Boots).  

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Coin Sleuth

A story of finding a coin's pedigree by accident... After purchasing a highly prized "Mid-Pacific Aloha Carnival Dollar" that depicts the great Hawaiian Olympian "Duke Kahanamoku" (So called dollar HK-721/Medcalf & Russell 2M-329) for my "Territory of Hawaii Souvenir" collection, I did an online search for similar coin in circulated condition. The coin is not dated, but the Mid-Pacific Carnival was held in 1914 in Honolulu, Territory of Hawaii. A rare "Dukie" in uncirculated condition in this link http://so-calleddollars.com/Events/Hawaii.html After viewing an icollector hit, I started to compare coins. I noticed an erie resemblance as I looked at each unique feature between the two. Obverse: A darken A in Pacific. Bumps along rim from D to P of Mid-Pacific. Reverse: Nick below II of Hawaiian. Nick in the center of the I in Islands. Patina matches in both observe and reverse. My photo is slightly darker as it was taken with my Android phone in my home office. To my surprise every visual feature was an exact match! In conclusion, my "Dukie" is lot #41 from Heritage 2007 Long Beach California auction. Left image taken by me. Right image taken online. Only 5 "Dukies" have been graded by NGC http://www.ngccoin.com/NGCCoinExplorer/CoinDetail.aspx?CoinID=851117 Mine will be the 6th... To see old comments for this Journal entry, click here. New comments can be added below.

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Numismatic Detective - The Remember Pearl Harbor Pocket Coins

Here come my Japanese Zeros! There still is a lack of correct information about the "Remember Pearl Harbor" coins. These coins: 2M-379 (Copper); 2M-380 (Copper "Pat. Pending"); 2M-381 (Nickel) and 2M-382 (Sterling Silver), as identified in the Hawaiian Money Standard Catalog, 2nd Edition by Medcalf and Russell, 1991). The documented mintage: 2M-379/2M-380 10,000 minted 2M-381 5,000 minted 2M-382 Unknown minted A check of four reference books verifies the 10,000 and 5,000 mintage figures. As for the sterling silver coin, its mintage number is unknown at this time. I recently purchased another "Remember Pearl Harbor" coin to add to my collection and discovered a new variety! The coin is a 2M-382 Sterling Silver with "Pat. Pending" markings and is unlisted in any numismatic reference book. After searching the internet for additional related information, I found an interesting 1942 ad by the coin manufacturer, Metal Arts Company of Rochester NY. These coins were first advertised for sale in the February 14, 1942 issue of The Billboard (sixty-nine days after Pearl Harbor was attacked). From the ad, it can be determined that 2M-379/2M-380 have been misidentified as being copper (ad states bronze). After rechecking my Hawaiian numismatics books (both editions of Medcalf and Russell (1978, 1991); Medcalf and Fong (1967); and Gould and Bressett (1961)), Gould and Bressett was the only book that correctly listed them as bronze. From the ad, it can be determined that the bronze and sterling silver coins were awaiting completion of its patent (ad states "Patient Pending"). Hence, this is documented proof that there are in existence sterling silver coins with the markings "Pat. Pending". From the ad, there was no mention of the nickel coin being offered. It has yet to be determined that there are in existence nickel "Pat. Pending" coins. Below is my squadron of "Japanese Zeros": one bronze "Pat. Pending", three bronze, one nickel (with hole) and one sterling silver "Pat. Pending". I will post a better picture of the sterling silver coin in the future. I'm looking forward in having this squadron be NGC graded/encapsulated. Lastly, check out the 1942 prices in the ad.... To see old comments for this Journal entry, click here. New comments can be added below.

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Alternate Reality or Just a Blunder

Perhaps a  new numismatic collecting category is required? Blunder collecting... As it can be explained, a few intact specimens slipped by the manufacturer who eagerly holed-out the "49" as to remove the obvious timing blunder as Alaska became the  49th state. This is not an error. It's an unfortunate timing of the Alaska statehood event when this SCD was struck. Actually, SCD HK-722A can be claimed as a specimen from the Territory of Hawaii period (and while the US had only 48 states). Why does the NGC census reflect a population of 4 for So Called Dollar (SCD) HK-722A? NGC does not grade holed specimens, but rather pushes them into the NGC DETAILS realm. Hence the low population of intact HK-722A in the NGC census. I enjoy seeing newbie collector faces when I tell them this specimen is from the alternate reality of the United States of which Hawaii was the 49th state and Alaska was never a state...    

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An Original Ike from the US Mint (1960)

Handed out by President Eisenhower himself! I started research about the Eisenhower appreciation medals and would like to share current findings from correspondences between the White House, US Treasury Department, and the US Mint in Philadelphia. Printed numismatic documentation of this medal and medal series is sparse. I would appreciate any information/images that can be shared with me in completing my research. The significance of this medal are: 1. It was ordered by the White House and executed by the US Treasury department. 2. It was struck at the US Mint in Philadelphia. 3. Frank Gasparro provided drawings of the design. 4. First US Mint product to bear the State of Hawaii as a design element. 5. This is 1 of 14 silver dollar size medal ordered by the White House in 1960. The NGC coin in the picture is in my personal collection. I call it "The Hawaiian Ike". Also "One of the Original Ikes". Research is for either a booklet, pamphlet, or article for publication. I started a catalog listing of this particular medal series. Below is the "Hawaiian Ike": DDE-T3-06 1960 US Silver Dollar Size Obverse: Two flaming torches with 13 star border with text "WITH APPRECIATION FROM" and Dwight D. Eisenhower (facsimile signature) Reverse: Text centered "HAWAII JUNE 1960" with border that represents compass points. Medium sized star on each side of JUNE. To see old comments for this Journal entry, click here. New comments can be added below.

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Remember Pearl Harbor

A pair of medals to remember the attack on Pearl Harbor... I picked both of these medals from an auction site dealing with WWII memorabilia. I was amazed that I actually found these medals at a non-numismatic auction. Listed as 2M-380 (copper, mintage 10,000) and 2M-381 (nickel, mintage 5,000) in Hawaiian Money, 2nd edition by Medcalf and Russell. The holed nickel medal is a filler at the moment. It's interesting that a Japanese Zero is the main design feature. The medals are also listed in Hawaiian Coins, Token and Paper Money by Gould and Bressett. This book indicates that these medals were sold throughout the US at 5c and 10c stores... I'm in search for an uncirculated nickel and sterling silver version. I have both versions of the copper (with and without text "Pat. Pending"... To see old comments for this Journal entry, click here. New comments can be added below.

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Numismatic Detective - Undated Honolulu Carnival Dollar

HK-721 features an Olympic gold medalist Information on the so called dollar HK-721 is bear to locate. Identified as the "Honolulu (Aloha) Carnival Dollar" and given an R-5 rarity (estimated that less than 200 known). Date of mintage is unknown. A good starting point was researching the "Mid-Pacific Carnival" (MPC). I found posters and post cards that indicated the carnival series lasted from 1910 through 1917. My focal point was the year 1914 as the HK-721 "surf rider" bears the resemblance of the poster's surf rider. Poster names the surf rider as Duke Kahanamoku. In 1912, Duke Kahanamoku broke the 200m freestyle in his Olympic trial heat. He went on to win the gold in 100 m freestyle and silver in the 4x200 relay team. Duke was also making surfing popular around the world. One can make the case that Duke Kahanamoku is the surf rider on HK-721. And that HK-721 was made available at the 1914 MPC. I scanned the archived Hawaii newspapers from 1910 through 1917, period when the carnival series was held. As a reference point in history, Hawaii became a US territory in 1900 and WW1 lasted from 1914 -- 1918. The Hawaii newspapers I reviewed indicate the MPC was led by a director general. Many of the articles reflect poster selection by the MPC committee. The primary means of advertising MPC was by poster and postcards. The 1914 MPC committee was adamant that only territorial entries were to be accepted. Many of these original advertisements command a premium today. The 1915 MPC committee agreed to steer away in using a surf rider figure in its 1915 MPC poster and is reflected in its selection. Review of the MPC committee work in the newspaper archive reflects no mention of a coin, token or medal to be issued in conjunction with the MPC. This indicates that HK-721 was an unofficial souvenir. After reviewing a few 1914 advertisements I made discovery. Wall & Dougherty, a design firm that makes: "Medals, Plaques, Buttons, Badges, Emblems, and Prize Cups". As the ad states, "Are especially well equipped for making original designs". The advertisement itself does not draw any conclusion. However, the director general of the 1914 MPC was James Donahue Dougherty. He was also a partner in the firm Walls & Dougherty. Did Dougherty and his partner create and sold HK-721? The investigation continues on this possibility. In summary, it is possible that HK-721: 1) Was minted in late 1913 or early 1914 (MPC is held each February) 2) Minted by Wall & Dougherty as a 1914 unofficial MPC souvenir The investigation continues.... To see old comments for this Journal entry, click here. New comments can be added below.

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Unlisted So Called Dollar Variety: HK-723 "Star without Rays" ...Souvenir of Honolulu

Undocumented variety in So-Called Dollars by Hibler and Kappen. It has been a while since I posted a journal entry. I finally purchased a HK-723 "star without rays" variety. This variety is unlisted in So-Called Dollars by Hibler and Kappen. However, its listed in Hawaiian Money Standard Catalog. 2M-393 is the "star without rays" variety and 2M-394 is the "star with rays". The "with rays" and "without rays" are not minor varieties. There is one more difference. The "star with rays" weighs 29 grams. The "star without rays" weighs 23 grams. This indicates different planchets were used. This weight/planchet anomaly is also described in Medcalf & Russell. I added my "without rays" specimen to my custom set (Undated Hawaii So Called Dollar Type Set). https://coins.www.collectors-society.com/wcm/CoinCustomSetGallery.aspx?s=12173 short url is http://goo.gl/zZMWd8 I also contacted Hibler and Kappen urging its listing as a new listing/discovery for their book. To see old comments for this Journal entry, click here. New comments can be added below.

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I Attended a Local Coin Show While Vacationing in Hawaii

Purchased a few Hawaiian Beauties Yesterday, I took my father and son (they both reside on the island of Oahu) to a local coin show in Hawaii. The event was listed at the Hawaii State Numismatic Association web page. A limited number of dealers were present. Don Medcalf (co-author of the book, Hawaiian Money, Standard Catalog, ISBN: 0962326305) had a table and I purchased a few Hawaiian medals from him. He invited me to visit his coin shop to look at his inventory. I will...later on during this vacation. I picked up three Hawaii Statehood medals circa 1959/1960 at reasonable prices. Just prior to my vacation I submitted 4 medals to NCS and 11 medals to NGC. NCS coins are "scheduled for grading". NGC places a status of "received" for the 11 medals. Hopefully, the coins will be shipped prior to the end of my vacation in December. To see old comments for this Journal entry, click here. New comments can be added below.

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Wow 1895 Hawaiian Reginald Huth Gold

An auction with rare Hawaiian coin ... Forsythe Collection I enjoy reading auction descriptions. Many of the high end auction companies really do their research to describe and point out the coin's or medal's rarity. This is especially true for the extreme rare Hawaii pieces. The example I recently seen is the 1895 Regina Huth $20 Gold of Princess Kaiulani (Lot 1880). There are also any other rarities in this auction. They are part of the upcoming May Pre-Long Beach Auction held by Ira and Larry Goldberg Auctioneers. Auction 69, Session 5 (Auction Catalog) http://images.goldbergauctions.com/php/auctions.php or short url (Lot 1880) http://outside-affiliatelinksnotallowed.com/cex22zm or actual link (Lot 1880) http://images.goldbergauctions.com/php/lot_auc.php?site=1&sale=69&lot=1880&lang=1

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Update: The Kennedy Appreciation Medal

Medal with a Presidential provenance... Updated 06/28/2014 The Kennedy Appreciation Medal was struck in 1962. Only 300 were minted at the US Mint in Philadelphia. The medal was first used in 1963 during Kennedy's trip to Ireland. I am still performing research on the Kennedy appreciation medal. If you have any original source information (US Mint or White House) or good leads, I would greatly appreciate it. To the best of my knowledge, only one catalog reference (K-62-1) is made (The Medallic Portraits of John F. Kennedy, by Edward C. Rochette, 1966) to the medal. Mr. Edward C. Rochette is a former Executive Director and ANA Past President. Mr. Rochette has written numerous numismatic books. His contribution to numismatics is unquestionable. The Medallic Portraits of John F. Kennedy provides a wealth of information about the Kennedy numismatic issues (domestic and foreign) up to the year of publication (1966). A point that needs to made about the book. Three individuals with ties to the US Mint were acknowledged as contributors on page 8. These names when associated with the book corroborates the correctness of the US Mint products that are listed. The three names listed on page 8 are Miss Eva Adams (director of US Mint), Gilroy Roberts (9th chief engraver US Mint whose term ended in 1964), and Frank Gasparro (10th chief engraver US Mint). The image is of an original medal recently added to my "Presidential with appreciation medal collection". This is not a re-strike. The concept of the presidential "with appreciation medal" is that at the discretion of the President, he presents the medal to an individual in thankful recognition. It is my opinion that the reserve design of the President Kennedy appreciation medal was used as the basis for developing the reverse of the Kennedy Half-Dollar. Previously written historical information lays claim that the John F. Kennedy presidential series medal (US Mint Inauguration medal for President Kennedy) was the basis for both the obverse and reverse designs. I see the connection with the obverse design; however, the reverse design is too small and the intricate details are not simply there. The obverse design is by Frank Gasparro. On the President's right shoulder is the name of the designer "F. GASPARRO" The intricate details of the reverse design on the Kennedy appreciation medal can be clearly seen on the Kennedy Half-Dollar. The Kennedy appreciation medal was also designed and struck before President Kennedy's assassination. There is one piece of information that backs my belief. The reverse of the Kennedy appreciation medal is by Frank Gasparro. His" FG" initials are also placed in similar locations on both the appreciation medal and the half-dollar coin. The Presidential Appreciation Medal Series is not a well-documented series. It is both challenging and rewarding. The challenge is to locate the source information and document it well. The reward is being the first to uncover new information and sharing it. Besides, these medals are a part of US history, not simply a coin or medal to commemorate an event or person. These medals was actually created for exclusive use by the President. Lastly, K-62-1a is uniface specimen (of only the reverse side struck) that is part of the Smithsonian collection. Note: If you read my previous journal entries, I uncovered the Eisenhower Appreciation medal series and documented all 17 medals. I still have yet to provide NGC or PCGS a reference copy and will do so shortly. The book is available on both amazon.com and createspace.com (search the title: The Dwight D. Eisenhower Appreciation Medals). To see old comments for this Journal entry, click here. New comments can be added below.

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Numismatic Detective - Hula Dancer and the Jet

Hula girl provides a visual dance that dramatizes or portrays words ... the jet provides travel... The medal of interest in this journal entry is called the Hawaiian Eye Fogal. Not much information is documented on the Hawaiian Eye Fogal medals, Medcalf & Russell 2M-128 (silver-nickel) and 2M-129 (antique bronze). These medals are unique in that it houses a miniature eye-piece that functions as a magnifying glass. Based on physical inspection of specimens I acquired, weight is 26 grams, diameter is 38 mm, and thickness is 3mm. The medal was invented and patented by Dr. St. Barth Alaska (patent 214946). There is also a small diameter hole to allow a string or chain to run through it so that it may be worn as a pendant. It can be assumed that the wearer would use the medal to enhance the vision of his/her eye. An item of note is that the eye-piece fits into place by inserting it from the reverse side. I believe this fitted mechanism (small diameter obverse/large diameter reverse that holds the eye-piece) is the basis for the patent. In discussing the medal with the coin dealer (who I purchased it from), it can be said that Dr. Alaska was an optometrist. The coin dealer purchased the medals from his great grandson. It is assumed that the medal is tied to the television series Hawaiian Eye (1959 - 1963). However, no televisions trade mark or other related show markings are exhibited on the medal. Even the font used on the medal to spell Hawaiian Eye does not match the font used on material used to promote the television show. Also, the symbolic Hawaiian Idol used to identify with the show is missing on the medal. An internet search was performed and I can surmise the Hawaiian Eye medal. It's an advertising piece for tourism and is highly unlikely related to the television series. There is also a jet and woman in Hawaiian attire (hula dancer outfit) on the reverse to promote travel to Hawaii. To give substance to my theory, I located comparable medal also with Dr. Alaska's name and patent number on it. It is also used to promote tourism for the country of Mexico. The placement of the eye-piece and pedant hole is in a similar location. What is interesting is that the Mexican pieces I have seen had the eye-piece removed or had fallen out (and in some cases replaced with a two-sided picture). The design also has a jet and a woman dressed in Mexican attire (design elements also in the Hawaiian Eye medals). These Hawaiian Eye medals are eligible for NGC grading and encapsulation as they are listed in the Medcalf & Russell reference book. Images are provide to compare the Hawaiian Eye Fogal medal and the Viva Mexico Ojo Focal medal. The image of the hula dancer is Ronnie Nanea Etsuko Oda ...For those not familar with the different types of hula she can be seen dancing at http://preview.outside-affiliatelinksnotallowed.com/axrxb9z http://preview.outside-affiliatelinksnotallowed.com/aqywu8x To see old comments for this Journal entry, click here. New comments can be added below.

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Numismatic Detective -1959 Official Hawaii Statehood Silver Medal

Happy 53rd Statehood Anniversary (August 21, 1959) Hawaii! Another investigation.... The Numismatist, May 1960 provides an ad with the details on the initial limited sterling striking of 2,500 serially numbered high relief Hawaii Statehood medals. There are two varieties documented (Medcalf & Russell) and is based on the spelling of the island of Niihau on the obverse. Variety 2MS-2a was struck first with the NII HAU spelling error (space between the I and H). Variety 2MS-2 was struck later with the correct spelling of NIIHAU. My curiosity got the best from me to find out definitive number of silver medals with the NII HAU spelling error. A Stack's 1998 auction catalog indicated that serial number 1022 with the error was sold. Sold at the same auction was serial number 1023 with the error. A Heritage 2007 auction catalog indicated that serial number 1266 was sold, but did not identify the variety. In 2010, I acquired serial number 1266 and identified it as a non-error variety. Currently, serial number 1266 has been identified as the lowest serial number without the error. (If you have information about the variety for serial number 1024 through 1265, as it will be beneficial to Hawaii numismatic collectors). My additional research indicates the following: a) 2,500 silver medals was stuck (first striking serial number 1 through 2500, correct spelling made at serial number 1266) b) 500 silver medals was stuck due to complaints from Hawaii citizens (second striking serial number 2501 through 3000) c) 154 silver medals was struck for the lieutenant governor as political gifts (third striking without serial number) I posted the following at my GWU website (back in December 2011)... "It can be estimated, with high probability, that no less than 1,265 of the 2MS-2a variety (with the island of Niihau spelling error) of the Official Hawaii Statehood medal in sterling silver were minted." ~D.A. Gomez, December 19, 2011 This research was also posted on wikipedia http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Statehood_010a.jpg (wikipedia plate coin is serial number 33 reverse, used on the Seal of Hawaii wiki page) References http://www.artfact.com/auction-lot/us-medals-hawaii-statehood-medal,-1959-by-spe-44-p-jaqmji1l6q http://www.artfact.com/auction-lot/us-medals-hawaii-statehood-medal,-1959-a-seco-43-p-k2e4rhtjhw http://www.coinbooks.org/esylum_v12n39a16.html http://www.coinbooks.org/esylum_v12n40a13.html To see old comments for this Journal entry, click here. New comments can be added below.

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Inadvertent NGC Body Bags

My Pearl Harbor Casualties circa 12/12/12 While on my Hawaiian vacation, I was dismayed in learning that three of my 1941 Remember Pearl Harbor medals from my NCS/NGC submittal were flagged as "Ineligible Type" (class of coin, medal or token that NGC does not certify). Wait ... what do you mean they are "Ineligible Type"? After I arrived back to the east coast, I sent an email to NGC to explain to me which specific items in the Medcalf & Russell reference book (Hawaiian Money Standard Catalog) where ineligible and eligible. The medals being returned back to me were 2M-379, 2M-380, and 2M-382. Only the 2M-382 had undergone conservation. Someone on the NGC staff replied in an email and apologized for the mix-up. Apparently, the mix-up occurred during the NCS to NGC transition. The 1941 Remember Pearl Harbor medals are eligible for encapsulation and grading. The medals arrived back to me today. They will be mailed out tomorrow. The turn-around time will restart. I estimated I will get these medals back in 31 days (5 days to NGC, 21 business days at NGC, and 5 days from NGC). However, with the upcoming holidays (NGC closure and snail mail delays) I should not expect the coins until February 1st. To see old comments for this Journal entry, click here. New comments can be added below.

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Rare Uniface 1959 Official Hawaii Statehood Medal

Only 30 of these fully struck uniface medals are documented to have been struck Notice the NII HAU spelling error... Notice the bright bronze surface (oxidized in later stage of production)... Notice the excessive outward flow of medal (trimmed in later stage of production)... To see old comments for this Journal entry, click here. New comments can be added below.

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NGC Coin Details - Slick Smartphone App

Fun with my smartphone ... Even scans a barcode image on a laptop screen The "NGC Coin Details" smartphone app is a wonderful certification verification tool (used on my Samsung GALAXY S III). The barcode scanner is terrific (saves time from manually typing in the lengthy NGC certification number). I checked out many of my NGC encapsulated coins within my collection today and was very impressed. Most did not display an image of the actual coin, but did verify its certification. On a whim, I scanned the barcode of a coin displayed on my laptop screen and the app worked! The result is in the image below. One can also zoom in on the either the obverse or reverse for a closer inspection of the coin. It seems the actual image of the coin will only be shown if the coin's owner requested an image during the coin's certification process. For my "release ceremony" coin, I did order images and it did appear via this app. The app also stores a history of the coins that was scanned. It also provides features found at the full NGC website (coin specifics, varieties, price guide and auctions).   I now have a smartphone tool to verify NGC certified coins displayed on my computer screen or while holding the coin in my hand. My "NGC Coin Details" smartphone app rating: 5 out of 5 stars To see old comments for this Journal entry, click here. New comments can be added below.

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Interstate H-3 Coin

What? An interstate highway in Hawaii... A relative gifted this race coin to me a few years back. She volunteered at the 1997 Great Trans Koolau Trek and was awarded this coin. I recently did some research on it and its mintage is 460 (information from http://www.royalhawaiianmint.com/database.htm) H-3 is one of the most expensive interstate highways built. It cost $80 million dollars per mile 0(http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Interstate_H-3) I made this video last year while traveling on part of H-3 (turn up your volume for the music) ;list=UUOKCz1C40is8X2knKkHBqsw&index=6&feature=plpp_video To see old comments for this Journal entry, click here. New comments can be added below.

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Numismatic Detective -- Father of Modern Surfing

Surfs up dudes/dudettes... The book Hawaiian Money: Standard Catalog "Second Edition" by Medcalf and Russell is the so-called "bible" for Hawaii numismatics. However, as a generalized catalog there numerous examples in which specific details are simply missing. This is a source of intrigue for me (filling in the holes in numismatic references). In this journal entry are the results of researching medal 2M-225 (page 115 of Hawaiian Money) also known as the Duke Paoa Kahanamoku -- Father of Modern Surfing. Mintage was not listed in Hawaiian Money (weight is 1 oz., diameter is 39 mm, and metal is 0.999 silver). Only an obverse image is provided. I can assure you that I have not handled this particular numismatic item with my own hands, but have found some most interesting information (including additional pictures). I have three specimens in route to me for further study. My in progress research results (new information is identified and is being documented here for the first time for the numismatic community): (NEW) 2M-225 limited edition design was commissioned by The American Surfing Organization. (NEW) 2M-225 was struck in 1976. (NEW) 2M-225 mintage is 1,596. (NEW) 2M-225 was struck in a sterling silver proof finish. (NEW) Striking of the proof sterling silver specimens required approval by the American Surfing Organization. (NEW) 2M-225 can be located in the 1976 Franklin Mint Special Commemorative Issue Medal set. (NEW) 2M-225 is SCI 76-30 in the 1976 Franklin Mint Special Commemorative Issue Medal set. (NEW) 2M-225a (my addition to Hawaiian Money) is a newly discovered and unlisted variety in proof bronze (unlisted variety in Hawaiian Money). (NEW) 2M-225a proof bronze mintage is unknown (however, it is a smaller mintage than the sterling silver proof). (NEW) 2M-225b (my addition to Hawaiian Money) is a newly discovered and unlisted variety in uncirculated bronze. (NEW) 2M-225b uncirculated bronze mintage is unknown. Here is the current back story of 2M-225, 2M-225a, and 2M-225b: The American Surfing Organization commissioned the Franklin Mint to create the medal. Franklin Mint struck and provided the completed medals (uncirculated bronze). Franklin Mint obtained approval from the American Surfing Organization to utilize the design for the 1976 Special Commemorative Issues Medals set struck in proof sterling silver. The Franklin Mint also struck a limited number in proof bronze later in the year. The 2M-225 is eligible to be NGC encapsulated and graded since it is listed in the Hawaiian Money reference. Wait...a Franklin Mint medal eligible for NGC encapsulation and grading? Yes... 2M-225a and 2M-225b are both unlisted in the Hawaiian Money book. The question put forth to NGC is the eligibility of newly discovered medals of the same design but struck in a different metal and finishes ... To see old comments for this Journal entry, click here. New comments can be added below.

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A "66" for my "26"

My NCS conservation results ... Fee to conserve my 1959 Hawaii Statehood medal was $21. Shipping back to me was an additional $19.70. NGC grading fee was set at $42 which included an oversize holder fee. As for the results, my medal (serial number 26) graded MS 66 and is now residue free! I am well pleased with the service provided by both NCS and NGC. To see old comments for this Journal entry, click here. New comments can be added below.

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Sale Akin to Hoard Dispersal

The Royal Hawaiian Mint (RHM) is commemorating its 40th anniversary by emptying its vaults. I first reported their sale of past issues (i.e. hoard dispersal) on September 12, 2014 at my website. These are originally struck issues and not re-strikes. On September 16, 2014, Coin World reported the 40th anniversary of the RHM and the availability of related commemorative issues. Coin World's write-up did not mention the sale of past issues.       Many of the RHM issues are available for NGC encapsulation/grading under its World Coin (Krause Publication) listing or Medcalf & Russell listing. An example of the Krause cross listing is provided at the end of this entry.       Hawaiiana numismatists (includes me) are ecstatic with the offerings and many issues have sold out quickly. Several offerings being released are private issues (not previously offered for sale) or difficult to acquire issues.       A sold out private issue example is the 1989 King Kalakaua Gold Hawaii State Numismatic Association (HSNA) medal (1/20 ounce, 13 mm, and .999 fine gold) with a mintage of 65. This medal is listed in Medcalf & Russell as 2M-200. RHM gold issues with miniscule mintage are tough to acquire.       Another offering of limited issue is the 1992 Waterhouse Commemorative. Only 50 bronze medals were issued. The following description was taken from the RHM website:       "The Waterhouse family dates back to John Thomas Waterhouse Sr. a Methodist missionary and his son, John Thomas Waterhouse Jr., who arrived in Hawaii with his father in 1851. John T. Waterhouse Jr. started the Waterhouse Trust Company, a financial firm dealing with real estate, brokerage, investments and insurance. He also served in the Legislature during the monarchy, the Provisional Government, the Republic of Hawaii and favored Hawaii's annexation to the United States. John T. Waterhouse issued the earliest known Hawaiian token in soft white metal with the bust of King Kamehameha III on the obverse and the name of his firm on the reverse with the Hawaiian inscription "hale maikai" that means "house excellent"- a good place to do business. The tokens circulated from 1855 to 1860. The Waterhouse name is still well known in Hawaii today, as descendants of John T. Waterhouse carry on the traditions of their early pioneer family with several business enterprises. In 1992, the Mint was honored to commemorate the 80th birthday of Alexander Cooke Waterhouse with gold, silver and bronze medals based on the original 1855 tokens issued by the Waterhouse Company of Honolulu."       The above mentioned original Waterhouse token maybe seen at: http://www.ngccoin.com/coin-explorer/hawaii-pscid-82/-coinid-765662       Also being offered are the Hawaii Dala series. This includes the rare 24KT gold relief issues. Of the 14 Hawaii Dala offerings, 9 have sold out as of today. (Note: Most have obtain major listing status in the Krause catalogs and are one of the most expensive offerings at the RHM website).       There are too many examples to provide. In all, eight issue groupings are being offered. These include: Original Issues, Royal Issues, Historic Issues, Military Issues, Contemporary Issues, Hawaii Dalas, Current Issues, and Private Issues.           A Krause Publication listing of Hawaii Dala X# MB70 is for the RHM issued 1991 Princess Kaiulani Silver Dala with First Day of Issue counter stamp.       http://www.ngccoin.com/price-guide/world/hawaii-dala-x-mb70-1991-cuid-140099-duid-348605       You will to need to peruse the Hawaii country listing in the Krause catalogs to locate the RHM issues.       I personally have made multiple purchases. Of the 13 items I've ordered, 7 are now sold out. To see old comments for this Journal entry, click here. New comments can be added below.

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I Was There!

I see a need for a Ceremony Release designation for coins/medals obtained at an US Mint coin/medal release day ceremony. Why? Because I was there! I was not there 30-days after the fact (designation criteria for Early or First Release labels). I was in attendance to support the celebration of the Star-Spangled Banner Commemorative Coin Release Day ceremony at Fort McHenry National Monument and Historic Shrine in Baltimore Maryland at 11:00 am on the morning of March 5, 2012. The ceremony was both a revisit of my past US history lessons and renewed celebration of our national anthem, the Star-Spangled Banner, as penned by Francis Scott Key as he watched the bombardment of Fort McHenry by the British Royal Navy ships. The ceremony also celebrated the release of the Star-Spangled Banner Commemorative Coins. After the ceremony ended, the US Mint workers began selling these commemorative coins to ceremony attendees. Roughly, 25 minutes before the US Mint internet sales began at noon. I purchased each commemorative coin in person: An uncirculated silver $1, a proof silver $1, an uncirculated gold $5 and a proof gold $5. I also stood in line to get each US Mint COA signed and dated by Daniel Shaver, Chief Counsel of the United States Mint, who officially represented the US Mint at the ceremony. The four signed/dated US Mint COAs authenticates my purchase on March 5, 2012. Mr. Shaver also signed and dated four celebration certificates attesting that I was at the ceremony when I made the coin purchase.(See image below - signatures redacted to prevent forgeries) The next day, I read an article in the Baltimore Sun indicating that the US Mint sold all of its ceremony gold coin inventory within a hour after the ceremony ended. The ceremony gold coin inventory was a mere 16 pieces. As for the ceremony silver coin inventory, the US Mint sold roughly half of its 400 ceremony inventory. Today, I look at my newly acquired Star-Spangled Banner commemorative coin set with pride. I have 2 of the 16 gold coins from the release day ceremony. I also have 2 of the 400 silver coins from the release day ceremony. I have the proper documents authenticating these commemorative coins as ceremony release. More importantly, I was there! I really did attend and experience the Star-Spangled Banner Commemorative Coin Release Day ceremony. So for those seeking Early or First Release designation for the Star-Spangled Banner Commemorative Coins you have 27 days left as of this writing. Also, please visit Fort McHenry National Monument and Historic Shrine within your 27-day deadline period. It should be noted that its estimated that only six 4-coin ceremony release sets could have been assembled. So now the search begins for the owners of the remaining five ceremony release sets. In closing, I have posed the question to NGC in allowing my set to be designated as Ceremony Release. No word from them yet.

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Shot-Down Spy Plane Results in the Forced Destruction of Gold & Silver U.S. Mint Medals

Want to learn more? Yesterday, the American Numismatic Association confirmed that my submitted Money Talk topic was accepted for presentation at the upcoming ANA 2015 World's Fair of Money in Chicago! I'll be showing images of the gold & silver U.S. Mint medals that were forced to be destroyed (part of the U.S. Mint's "non-disclosure" series of medals). The main focus of my presentation is to present information about the U.S. Mint's "non-disclosure" series of medals. This U.S. Mint series has eluded being documented by U.S. numismatists and U.S. historians. The U.S. Mint has neither publicly disclosed general numismatic information nor provided any information whatsoever about this "non-disclosure" medal series that they designed and manufactured. I know exactly why it's a "non-disclosure" series and why the U.S. Mint is still keeping it under wraps . It will be explained and supporting evidence will be shared at the ANA 2015 World's Fair of Money in Chicago. To see old comments for this Journal entry, click here. New comments can be added below.

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Territory of Hawaii !

Kingdom of Hawaii->Republic of Hawaii->Territory of Hawaii->State of Hawaii Finally, updated my "Territory of Hawaii Souvenir Pieces" custom set with pictures. The pictures are of raw coins I have secured in which I want NGC grading and encapsulation. http://coins.www.collectors-society.com/wcm/CoinCustomSetGallery.aspx?s=8347 I'm holding out my entire submission until I locate a non-holed version of the 2M-381. This is one tough medal to locate... Picture below illustrates my motive for the custom set and was taken from Hawaiian Coins, Token and Paper Money by Gould and Bressett, 1961, page 40. To see old comments for this Journal entry, click here. New comments can be added below.

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Numismatic Detective -- 1891 US Patent Centennial Medal

I should incorporate the words "Numismatic Detective" in a parody song in the style of the original song by Elvis Costello "Watching the Detectives" Earlier last week I submitted paperwork to my lawyer for a US Patent filing. Within days, I was contacted with news that a US Provisional Patent application was officially filed under my name with my invention at the US Patent & Trademark Office in Washington DC. This was my second ever US patent filing. Curious in tying my work (I'm an engineer by trade) with one many my hobbies that I take pleasure in (numismatics in this case), I began to search for any numismatic material relating to the US Patent Office. I found a few modern tokens. Then a rather interesting item caught my eye, a holed example of the 1891 US Patent Office Centennial medal in aluminum. I found a few example pictures on the internet. One example was in the Harry Bass Collection. A few sold at various auctions. Unfortunately, each had a hole to suspend it for wear or display. I located an 1892 publication titled Celebration of the beginning of the second century of the American patent system at Washington City, D. C., April 8, 9, 10, 1891. A plethora of Washington politicians and inventors are identified as attending. The more noteworthy inventors include: Alexander Graham Bell, Samuel Morse, Thomas Edison, George Westinghouse, etc...   http://outside-affiliatelinksnotallowed.com/9xfyeq4 Page 36 states that the medal is pure aluminum and was provided as a souvenir. A website identified the medal as 48 mm in diameter and 4 mm thick. It was also designed by C. L. Chapelle. The initials CLC can be seen on the obverse. I did locate an unholed specimen in uncirculated condition with wonderful eye appeal. This is the only unholed example I have seen and immediately purchased it (I'm awaiting for its arrival). I believe this is a presentation specimen. The text is from the 1892 publication and the picture is the medal I purchased. To see old comments for this Journal entry, click here. New comments can be added below.

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