NGC Journals

Our community journals

  1. Looking back, I made the first entry into this journal on June 14, 2007, when I was not quite 21 years old (clocking in at 32 now, with a receding hairline. Oh, how it does sting a bit). 

     

    This was 10 years before NGC would switch to the new (current) journal format and we’d gain the ability to give a unique name to our journals. I’ve given some thought over time to what I think I’d like to call this (other than just “Revenant” or “Revenant’s Journal”) and I think I’ve settled on an answer: 

    “When I’m Wiser and I’m Older.” 

     

    It’s a reference to a song by Avicii that I’ve loved ever since the first time that I heard it, called “Wake me up.” The first versus and the chorus of the song are as follows: 

     

    Feeling my way through the darkness 

    Guided by a beating heart 

    I can't tell where the journey will end 

    But I know where to start 

    They tell me I'm too young to understand 

    They say I'm caught up in a dream 

    Well life will pass me by if I don't open up my eyes 

    Well that's fine by me 

     

    So wake me up when it's all over 

    When I'm wiser and I'm older 

    All this time I was finding myself, and I 

    Didn't know I was lost 

     

    I had this idea when thinking about a comment I made about the hobby and life being a journey and the self-discovery aspect of that on thisistheshow’s journal entry a few months ago. 

     

    The part of the song I’ve always loved are the last two lines of the chorus, “all this time I was finding myself and I didn’t know I was lost.” I feel like that fits well with my experience and the changes I’ve undergone in the last 12 years – spanned and covered somewhat unevenly by this journal. 

    It's hard to think of a core aspect of myself that hasn’t changed much since this journal was started. I’ve gone from being a single, 20-year-old, undergrad college student to being a married father of two, with a PhD, 7 published peer-reviewed papers. The things that were the all-consuming focus of my collecting life 10 years ago are almost an afterthought at the moment as I pursue radically different endeavors.

     

    It’ll be interesting to see what I’m doing in another 10 years and if I’m still writing entries here. 

     

    Naming the PMG journal “Gradually, then suddenly,” to match my signature set was pretty easy comparatively. That collection of entries / writings basically exists as a testament to  my obsession with those notes and hyperinflation notes in general – and, one of these days, when I’ve completed or mostly completed the Zimbabwe set, I am going to expand to include Yugoslavian, Venezuelan, Hungarian, Argentinian and other hyperinflation notes. At least, that’ll be the plan / hope. 

     

    Who knows? Maybe one of these days all of this will offer my sons some insight into how my head works. 

  2. I have been following a lot on EBAY for several days and waiting to see if their would be any bidders or if it would simply timeout.  I sometimes use this method to monitor a lot I might want, but am not willing to pay the price, for one reason or another.
    Well, this lot of three irradiated dimes caught my eye, and I almost pulled the trigger at the original price but hesitated because the only Dime I was really interested in, was the Dime in the Worlds Fair holder, the other two were nice, but I already had examples.  The price was pretty good though, about $11 each when you added in postage.  The thing that made me hesitate was a thought that maybe if the lot expired without a bid, it would be relisted at a lower price, that happens sometimes, and I often buy when that happens.  

    This lot closed without a bid, and the owner did relist but at a HIGHER price, from 29.99 to 31.99 plus postage of 3.89.  Higher Price, what is this dude thinking? It puzzles me.   Maybe he raised the price because:

    1.  the old marketing concept of perceived value, if a thing is cheaply priced, the perception is the product is inferior, a higher price raises the perceived value in the eyes of the consumer.   The seller thinks the higher price will attract a better heeled buyer.
    2.  Someone told him his original price was too  low and that each of those dimes should sell for at least 15.00 each, he decided to raise the price because he thinks they're correct after doing his own research on irradiated dime sold prices.  But again, it was not a BIN sale, so if there were interest, he should have at least received the minimum bid.
    3.  He put no real thought into the price increase, he just saw that EBAY offered to relist and raised the price for heck of it.  

    What do you think?  I am still following this lot, but I am far less likely to buy it now, if he had even left the lot the same price, I probably would have put in a minimum bid.

     

  3. Happy Mothers Day to all the Collectors Society Mothers. Some years ago I may have posted this coin but I don't remember. That said the message of this coin is always appropriate and I dedicate it to mothers everywhere. Therefore, I am posting this coin and its story now.

    The 2008 Latvian 20-Lats gold coin commemorates the 15th anniversary of the renewal of the Lats currency following Latvian independence from the old Soviet Union. Though this coin commemorates Latvian Independence, it also celebrates motherhood by utilizing a 1922 design conceived by sculptor Teodors Zalkalns, but never used. Additionally, this coin has the distinction of being named the Coin of the Year in 2010 by Krause Publications. Krause Publications is a leading publisher of several numismatic books and periodicals.

    This NGC MS-67, 2008 Latvian 20-Lats coin minted by the Austrian Mint has a mintage of only 5000. The diameter of the coin is 22mm and weighs 10 grams. This coin has a gold fineness 0.999 and has an actual gold weight of 0.352739 Oz.

    The gold "Coin of Latvia" shines with the promise of a good fortune and happiness in the future. It is also a special sign of recognition of an outstanding Latvian sculptor, since it carries out the project conceived by Teodors Zalkalns (Grinbergs until 1930; 1876-1972) in 1922 to create a 20-lats gold coin. The plaster model of the coin preserved in the archives of the Latvian National Museum of History contains symbols that are of great significance to Latvia.

    Zalkalns' images of mother belong to the classical treasures of Latvian sculpture. The sculptures created during World War I and modeled after a refugee from Courland are a potent symbol of the nation's suffering and transcending that suffering. The obverse of the coin also features a woman in a headscarf, which to any Latvian signifies motherhood: when a baby was born, the husband presented the wife with a headscarf. A woman used it to cover her head whenever she ventured out in the world. Folk tradition has it that a person who is lost can find the right way if she turns the headscarf inside out and ties it anew; that a knot in one of the loose ends can help one remember, and if such a knot is tied when a star is falling, one's wish will come true. All these good things are tied to the mother image. Mother is the symbol of never-ending cycle of life, linking the past, present and future generations.

    The feminine principle gives life to an individual and likewise is at the core of the family and state. The feminine principle unites the spiritual with the material; the symbols on the reverse of the coin, bread, apple, vessel with a curdled milk beverage and a jug of milk also signify fertility and plenitude. A knife, symbolizing masculine action, is placed next to the feminine images.

    Finally, I want to thank all the mothers out there for the selfless sacrifices they make on behalf of their children. I also want to thank my wife for her unconditional love for my children. I also want to thank my mother for putting up with me and instilling Christian values in my life that have allowed me to be successful and joyful in spite of the hardships. I love you Mom, I love you Linda.

    Gary

     

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  4. Hi everyone. This is a question that people ask me all the time. Well the circulated ones are not. Face it they were used to buy food and clothes. You can see the red and brown and also the proof like. Why is that?. Well Britain has been around for centuries. They learned fast. There are tokens uncirculated that would shock you with there value. Now many of these great token were collected by professional collectors. They were kept in a wooded chest with drawers. I have seen them for sale in Heritage. The wood is very hard wood. And they had wooden circles and felt on the bottom of the drawers. They were kept way from the fire place and Windows and very rarely opens or handled.

         Now you figure that was good for about a hundred years and sold to auction houses. There they never saw the light of day until an auction. Some are still in the vaults the original color still there the first ones off the die you see you're finger reflection five inches away. They were never stored in little white envelopes with cotton inside. That was done at auction time. There were taken care of uncirirculaded and should be given the respect of some of our current coins.. Some are 225 years and say no way. That's because you don't know the history of them. If you know the history behind how these were taken care of you would understand a MS 66. If that's what it calls for that's the way it should be graded. Never never hold a good grade from a token if it deserves it. I just told you how they were taken care of. They were treated with care because the workmanship means so much. These were a collectors prized possession. They knew what they were worth. They took care like we take care of ours. Yes ours are new. But these were treated with care respectable and understanding. That's Why They grade well . The only thing in the basement was coal for the fire. They were never stored there. I tell this to people who collect them. The best place to buy these is were they all were made England. So if you want these in the shape they were made in there is only one place. English auctions. When they come out of the vaults they glisten like the sun. So I say to the graders the ones being sent to you they were taken care of like a baby. They were proud of there workmanship. When a grader looks at a Conder token don't look at the date look at the token. And be fair. I know there are 67 out there and should  be more. Just grade it like one made today you will be shocked at how well these pieces of art in copper and bronze are. All I ask is now you know part of the history you will know them better be fare. If you don't like them don't grade them because your taking it out on history. History of out hobby. Thanks for reading this I hope you picked something up. Mike

  5. A quick question for the community.  Would you consider the Royal Dutch Mint’s restrikes of the silver daalders to be coins or medals.  They bear a date and are struck by the Nederlandse Munt, and are commemoratives of the original daalders/ducat/ducaton.  NGC appears to recognize it as a ‘daalder’ or ‘dollar’ coin, but it doesn’t have an assigned Euro denomination.  So is it a medal then?   Thanks in advance.

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  6. Hi, I started to collect franklin half for a couple of month. I have a type 1, 1956 in mint state, my question is being in mint state would this be class as a franklin variety or not. Thanks don

  7. OGH Rattlers

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    Here is my newly graded MS-62 Cha'Or Flanders (1346-1384) Fr-163 Louis II  De Male !!

  8. Can anyone explain all the different NGC awards? Or is there a page somewhere? What's the difference between the blue and the red awards?

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  9. Newly edited and re-posted Owner's Comments for an ancient obol struck by Lepidus, part of The Roman Empire, an NGC Ancients Custom Set.

     

    Participating in the Roman Empire’s genesis were many monumental figures of ancient history: Julius Caesar, his ally-turned-assassin Brutus, Pompey the Great, the famous lovers Marc Antony and Cleopatra, Octavian (a.k.a. Augustus), and then there is…Marcus Aemilius Lepidus (88? - 12? BC). If the name isn’t familiar, no wonder - Lepidus turned out the prototypical persona non grata of Roman politics. Borrowing sic erat scriptum the tagline of a late, modern-day comedian, he didn't get no respect.

    Lepidus, an early supporter of Julius Caesar, held the post of praetor in 49 BC, and watched over Rome while his mentor defeated Pompey at Pharsalus. On March 14, 44 BC, while Lepidus served as Caesar’s magister equitum (Master of the Horse), he warned his leader about an imminent murder plot. Lepidus’ arguments proved unpersuasive, and the next day Caesar fell at the hands of a mob. (If Lepidus had been a more effective communicator, history might have turned out vastly different!) Afterwards, Lepidus had an opportunity to redeem himself by avenging Caesar’s murder and punishing the known perpetrators. Instead, Lepidus stayed his hand, following Marc Antony’s advice. Furthermore, Lepidus went along with Antony's opposition of Caesar's legally named heir, Octavian. However, the power grab by Lepidus and Antony failed, and the duo retreated to Gaul.

    It was in Gaul during this period (44 to 42 BC) that Lepidus struck this silver obol. It is rare, and one of only perhaps two issues he struck there. For the obverse, Lepidus portrayed Apollo, a traditional choice as opposed to the bold, new trend of self-portraiture. The verso presents a cornucopia encircled by a wreath, promising future prosperity.

    Lepidus’ own fortunes improved when Octavian convinced him and Antony to form together as Triumvirs. They divided Rome’s demesnes amongst themselves: Lepidus was assigned Spain and shared Gaul with Antony, junior partner Octavian controlled North Africa, and all three shared responsibility over Italy. The Triumvirs needed to re-conquer the rest: Sicily under Sextus Pompey’s control, and the eastern territories dominated by Brutus and Cassius. The latter duo fell in 42 BC at the Battle of Philippi. Afterwards, the Triumvirs readjusted their power-sharing. This time, Lepidus - almost expelled by Octavian as a suspected Sextus Pompey sympathizer - was demoted to control over North Africa.

    Understandably, Lepidus disapproved his reduced role. He strove to improve his lot while jointly campaigning with Octavian against Sextus Pompey's Sicilian forces. Lepidus landed on Sicily, and then proceeded to lead a land assault. He succeeded in regaining control over Sicily, and then, with Octavian still busy battling the enemy's navy at sea, Lepidus announced his intention to keep it. Lepidus’ land grab did not sit well with Octavian, who issued a challenge in response. Consequently, Lepidus’ legions defected en masse, fearing Octavian’s displeasure. The defenseless and humiliated Lepidus had no choice but to beg for Octavian’s mercy. Octavian indeed spared Lepidus’ life. However, Lepidus was required to abdicate all his political powers and titles, except for the largely meaningless post of Pontifex Maximus.

    Lepidus was expelled to the remote promontory of Mount Circeo, where he spent his remaining years in obscurity, watching Antony’s fall, Octavian's transition to Augustus, and the Republic’s transformation to Empire. Occasionally, Lepidus was allowed to visit Rome on official business. Even then, the humiliation continued; he was required to speak last.

    Historians traditionally view Lepidus as the Triumvirate’s weakest link, untrustworthy and ineffective. Even Shakespeare disparaged Lepidus, depicting him as a simpleton and a drunkard. Evidently, Lepidus still doesn’t get much respect.

    Coin Details: ROMAN IMPERIATORIAL, M. Aemilius Lepidus, as Triumvir(?), AR obol (0.43 g, 10.6 mm), Cabellio (Cavaillon), Gaul, 44-42 BC, NGC Grade: AU, Strike: 4/5, Surface: 3/5, Obverse: Head of Apollo right, CABE before, Reverse: Cornucopia, LE-PI in left and right fields, all within wreath, References: RPC 528; Sear CRI 491.

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  10. John Cava

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    This new blog is on, probably, my greatest hero outside of my immediate family, Nikola Tesla. The coin is one ounce .999 fine silver minted in the Serbian Mint for 2018. It has a 39.0 mm diameter. It has a value of 100 Serbian dinara. The total mintage is only 50,000.

       Featured on the obverse is a portrait of the inventor at the approximate age of 40.His name is above him. It is inscribed in both English and Serbian Cyrillic. Under his portrait is the legend "ELECTRICAL VISIONARY", then a lightning bolt. Below that is inscribed "POWERING THE FUTURE".  

       Centered in the middle is a picture of Tesla's induction motor, with the Serbian Coat of Arms top center. Below that is inscribed "ALTERNATING CURRENT" above and "LIGHTING THE WORLD" and "2018" below. Also inscribed are the words "REPUBLIKKA SRBIJA", 1 OZ., .999 SILVER" and "DINARA 100".

       The man himself has a varied and remarkable history. From the moment of his birth in 1856 during a lightning storm, to his questionable death on January 7, 1943 he led a mysterious life and career. He is most notable for inventing the A.C. motor. He was caught up in a war between Edison and Westinghouse. He was taken advantage of by both men and died penniless instead of the rich man he should have been. He had hundreds of patents and scientific awards to his credit.

       It has been theorized that he received help from aliens, as he was such a prolific genius. On the day of his death many cases of his notes were taken by the FBI. To this day not all of them are accounted for. The reader should research him themselves as I will go off on a rant.  He also was working on limitless, wireless, free electricity and a so called death ray, at the time of his death. Remnants of these can be found in Colorado Springs and New York.

       I better stop now. Please look at the photos below and comment on this blog. Thanks for your time.

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  11. Greetings once again;

                 Was wondering (since I have no experience) selling coins thru an auction house and it sounds like they charge basically the same for the same service, which Auction house(s) would you recommend in consigning coins to ?  What has been you positive AND negative experiences with them.  Appreciate all the responses.

    moondoggy (Mike)

  12. I have a number of world coins from renowned collections and it is a privilege to be their current custodian however most of these are raw - so how do I prove it?

    I do have the original invoice which demonstrates when and where I bought the coin but do people really provide a copy of this should they sell the coin to keep the provenance intact? Apart from 'flagship' coins where each individual is well documented it is only recently that auction catalogues have included pictures of most of the coins in a sale but then these are not always of sufficient quality to confirm a match. Graded coins include a reference number which would be an obvious way to track a coins history however not all auction houses include this is in the description or include a picture of the holder in addition to that of just the coin.

    Provenance included on the label of graded coins is very useful in this regard and I have some coins that highlight their pedigree this way (D. Moore Collection, E.P. Newman etc) however there is limited space on the label so for coins such as a very rare English Charles I halfcrown* which appeared at auction a few weeks ago, this is not the solution either as it would not be possible to include all this information on the holder, it is also impractical that labels will be updated each time a coin changes hands anyway. However I think it would be useful for this information to be added to the TPG databases and be available when looking up a certificate number. The grading company could verify the invoice etc, thereby protecting the personal details of the owner and thus attach valuable provenance to an individual coin (already done as part of adding provenance to a label?). In addition it would also be possible to attribute other important information associated with a coin such as whether it was used as a plate coin in reference texts etc, the wonders of modern technology means that this information could easily be updated.

    With new legislation, such as the German Cultural Assets Protection Act, starting to appear across the globe restricting the sale/export and/or ownership of such things as coins I consider a documented, unbroken, provenance critically important for current and future collectors and as such my major goal for 2019 is to try and sort out all my invoices, photograph/scan of all my coins and generate an electronic record of everything in a format such that my family can easily find things should I not be able to!

    *ex Mrs Street Collection, ex Hon. Robert Marsham Collection, ex Hyman Montagu Collection, ex J. G. Murdoch Collection, ex Virgil M Brand Collection, ex Richard Cyril Lockett Collection, ex John G Brooker Collection - abbreviated list!, I expect I am not the only one who views coins like this at auctions even though their value means they are never going to form part of my collection but it is nice, just the once, to have held them in my hand.

  13. This coin caught my attention, when it came up for auction recently, and I checked on the type in CoinFacts wiki and read that the obverse legend for this daalder included Philip's title as King of England.  

    With a little more research, I can say that the July 25th, 1554 marriage of Queen Mary of England to King Philip of Spain brought about a short period where Philip gained the title of King of England and Ireland and was deemed co-ruler by an Act of Parliament.  The terms of the marriage agreement limited Philip's reign to the duration of the marriage -- it lasted until Mary's death in 1558 upon which the throne went to her half-sister, Elizabeth I.

    As far as I can tell, coins using Philip's title as King of England are limited to a few issues from the Spanish ruled provinces of the Netherlands.  This interesting history plus the fact that I did not have a Spanish Empire crown from the reign of Philip II sealed the deal so I've added it to my crowns of the world collection.

    Obverse: Armored bust of Philip II, legend PHS D G HISP ANG Z REX COMES FLAN 1558 (Philippus dei gratia Hispaniarum Angliae etc rex comes Flandriae -- Philip by the grace of God King of Spain and England, Count of Flanders)

    Reverse: Crowned coat of arms of Philip II over the Burgundian cross, golden fleece below between a pair fire irons* emitting sparks, legend  DOMINVS MICHI ADIVTOR (dominus michi adivtor -- Lord my helper)

    *Jean Elsen catalog listings consistently call these "vuurijzers" which translates to fire irons, the iron implement struck by flint to start a fire. 

    ~jack

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    edited: to correct the translation of vuurijzers

  14. The title of my Journal, and this specific entry, is a takeoff on a series of old Kellogg's Corn Flakes commercials from when I was a kid. In those commercials, someone who had tried the cereal before, and maybe not enjoyed it or appreciated it, tried it again and really did like it. The tagline for the commercials was: "Try them again, for the first time". 

     

    In late 2018, I was on another forum where I responded to a thread about 2019 numismatic resolutions. My response was that I was going to try coin collecting again, for the first time. I think most of us know what I meant when I said that. Most of us made beginner mistakes when first collecting. And, in fact, most of us continue making mistakes even after we are no longer true beginners.  Unfortunately, these mistakes can lead us to have collections which we are not happy or satisfied with. This can lead to even more rash purchases as we try to just get that one coin that will turn around our collections. This scenario can be extrapolated out in many different ways unique to each collector, but nonetheless it is commonplace and relatable.

     

    So I decided to take a step back and try collecting again,for the first time.

    An important early step in this process is writing here in the Journals. I plan to give voice to my goals, lessons, and experiences,  not only to help myself but hopefully to help others.

  15. Found this in a hidden bottom of a box a friends family had given me. Anybody have a idea what it is?

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  16. Just thought I would try to catch up with folks.  I have been away for awhile as many of you know.  Health reasons.  My tests are finally in the normal + range.  But in February I had my 4th back surgery which left me much worse off than what I went in as.  But in July we got my next hobby to keep me waking up for something to do each day, being disabled and retired, in no particular order, and waiting for Mrs. to retire in 1 1/2 yrs. It is a 1972 Oldsmobile Cutlass Supreme with matching numbers and near original interior 84,000 miles.  We owned one when we got married in 1973 and miss it since then.  Looked for nearly 9 yrs to find one in good shape.  Being an ex auto mechanic, had to dig out the Motors and Chilton's to refresh on some things.  Was embarrassed to admit it but I have forgotten more than I can ever remember.  But none the less, I am pressing on.  I am hoping my Competitive Isle of Man cats gets some attention for this years awards as well as my custom cats of the world, or others, especially the Snow Leopards.  Hope my old followers will follow me again, as I will follow you as well.

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  17. I have a friend(fellow collector), who was seriously injured in a car fire and really needs some help! If you can do anything to help him and his family please follow this link:

    https://www.gofundme.com/6k3cba8

    If you can't that is understandable at this time of year, send a prayer his way! Please add William to your churches prayer list also. Thanks for your time, help and prayers and I hope you all have a Blessed Holiday Season! 

  18. Chapter 8 The Five Coins that never were and are worth a Fortune

    Anyone who has followed the trials and tribulations related to the 1933 Double Eagles in private hands knows simply possessing a coin does not mean you have the legal right to own it. I am no expert on what exactly the procedure is for coins and bank notes to become legal tender. From what I can gather from news articles the first step is that an order be placed for the coins or bank notes be produced. Once produced is this new currency now legal tender? Evidently not, the new currency must then be officially released which includes funds being transferred to the treasury equal to the face value of the new currency being introduced into circulation. In the case of the 1933 Double Eagle the coins were authorized to be struck but that is where it stopped. With the exception of one 1933 double eagle set aside to be presented to King Farouk of Egypt all other specimens were to be melted down. But even though King Farouk was officially presented his 1933 double eagle it was not officially removed from the mint in that the treasury never received payment from the State Department or any other government agency for release of that coin. The court ruling determined the coin was in fact a gift from the U.S. government to the King and was therefore allowed to exist in private hands but that it not come back into the U.S. until $20 in U.S. funds was paid to the U.S. treasury. The $20 was quickly paid and the coin is now in the U.S. in private hands.

    There are other strange situations related to U.S. coinage such as the 1870-S silver dollar. For example there are simply no mint records related to the production or release of these 12 coins. These 12 coins were all removed from circulation (1 is graded MS 62) and never known to have been in the hands of one family or individual thus implying they were released into general circulation as part of the normal operation of the San Francisco mint. This differs significantly from the 1933 double eagles being fought over in the courts that are all MS and in the hands of one family.

    But what upsets me the most are those #&*%!! 1913 Liberty Head Nickels. To me these five coins represent the darkest side of our hobby that is willing to reward individuals for thievery and allow their ill-gotten merchandise to be sold openly in the market place and to reap big bucks. What saddens me the most is that such practice is supported by the biggest and most prominent auction houses, dealers and collectors. Yes at least one 1913 Liberty Head die was made but that is as far as it went. When I started collecting coins in about 1950 (this was only 37 years after 1913) I heard stories of how these five coins were produced (either as a favor or for payment) for an individual who had an in at the mint. This position was reinforced three decades +/- later when I was living in Maryland and all five of these coins were placed on display at the Baltimore ANA show. I was a one man boycott of this show simply because these coins were being treated like royalty when in fact they were pretenders to the throne. While the ANA show was in town I heard and interview with the president of the ANA on the radio and when asked about the origin of these five coins he paused and the best he could do was imply they may have had a clandestine origin followed by a short laugh and that was all he would say. Please note that unlike the 1870-S dollars these five nickels are all MS, as with the 1933 double eagle, implying they were removed from the mint as group and kept way that until being split up.

    Also I would like to say thank you to those of you who have said they enjoy reading my journals.

    Best regards

    Ram

  19. 314330032_Mrs.ThomasLeiperandherdaughterHelenHamiltonLeiperbyCharlesWilsonPeale.jpg.70b0f80adcc380d8e14341c468939c6b.jpg

         "Mrs. Thomas Leiper and Her Daughter, Helen Hamilton Leiper" as shown on Oil on Canvas, 1794 by Charles Willson Peale. Do you recognize the features in the little one's face or perhaps on her mom's face? She would have been roughly two years old in the picture, having been born on April 20th 1792.

         After having grown up in Philadelphia, in 1814 she married Robert Maskell Patterson M.D. and had seven children. Philadelphia in 1792 was home to our first Mint. Mr. Patterson's dad was Robert Patterson L.L.D. who was the Director of the Mint from 1806 to 1824, having been appointed by President Jefferson. Mr. Robert Maskell Patterson M.D.was appointed Director of the Mint by President Andrew Jackson from July 1, 1835 to July 1851, having succeeded his brother-in-law Samuel Moore in that position who was appointed by President Monroe. A family monopoly for over 45 years, 1806 to 1851.

         The War of 1812 ended February 18, 1815 between Britain and the United States. Copper planchets did not arrive in casks from Matthew R. Bolton's English company until late in 1815. 1815 was the only year in which the United States did not coin any cents. On August 22 through the 24th of 1814 the British had dealt a major blow when a force attacked Washington burning the White House and among other buildings the Treasury. These events compiled to allow a refocus on 1816. It is well documented that 1814 was the last year for the Classic Head Cent with the fillet banner in her hair, due to dislike from the public of Engraver Robert Scot's design. 1815 then was used to let Design Engraver John Reich shape a new portrait. The Matron Head Large Cent design became of age and ruled or reigned from 1816 to mid-year 1835.

         Now enters the little girl in the picture, Helen Hamilton Leiper of Irish descent. She is now 23 years of age,with a father-in-law as acting Director of the Mint and a new bride having married his Irish descent son in 1814. A daughter-in-law's portrait fit for the 1816 John Reich design!

         Some testimonials:  Alexandre Vattemare from France (1796-1864) was a founder of the Boston Public Library and an advocate for public libraries and international library exchange. He wrote in his 1861 book or catalog; "COLLECTION DE MONNAIES ET MEDAILLES DE L'AMERIQUE DU NORD DE 1652 A 1858";"1808 a 1815" bear "le portrait de madame Madison" later the "Effigie de Mme Patterson". 

    Legendary Numismatist and Author Q. David Bowers in his 2018 book titled;"ALEXANDRE VATTEMARE AND THE NUMISMATIC SCENE"; mentions on pages 73 and 74 a catalog by Edward Cogan from 1877 that tells of engravers using Mrs. Patterson from 1816 to 1838.

         So here is my story of the portrait of the lovely Matron Head Large Cent and I am glad after two hundred plus years she has fame!

     

    1506347961_MatronHeadCombo.jpg.9c5f88d12e1deb9bd342b794424eac6d.jpg

     

     

  20. It all depends on how you ask the question…

    1. What year did a P mint mark first appear on a U.S. coin struck for circulation? --- 1942
    2. What year did a P mint mark first appear on a coin struck for circulation? ---------- 1941
    3. What year was the Philadelphia mint first identified on a circulating coin? ---------- 1895

    I submitted 43 coins to NGC at the World’s Fair of Money in Philadelphia this year.  The majority were raw coins for grading, but some were regrades, some for attribution, and one for conservation, regrading and attribution.  I finally got them all back in October and they allowed me to complete three sets that I have been working on for the past 15 years.  Two of these sets apply to the phrasing in question 2 above, and the third set to question number 3.  Taken together, they contain ALL of the15 coins struck before 1942 that explicitly identify the Philadelphia mint as their source.

    The sets listed below each have fairly extensive set descriptions as well as photos and descriptions for each coin in the set.

    • Competitive Set: Curaçao/Suriname - contains 14 coins struck by U.S. Mints, two of which are dated 1941 with a P mint mark. (The set isn’t technically complete, but it is for my purposes.)
    • Custom Set: Netherlands East Indies - Minted by the U.S. Mint - contains 20 coins struck by U.S. Mints, two of which are dated 1941 with a P mint mark.
    • Custom Set: Ecuadorian Coins Struck by Mints in the United States - contains 34 coins struck by mints in the United States, 11 of which were struck between 1895 and 1934 that identify the Philadelphia mint by name or abbreviation. PHILADELPHIA is fully spelled out on the reverse of the 1895, 1914, and 1916 Dos Decimos de Sucre.

    I will continue to upgrade these sets as time and money permit, but for now I have at least one good NGC graded example for each of these coins.

    Thanks for reading and good luck to all vying registry awards.

  21. Hi All

    The first set of 20 Roosevelt dimes has been entered for the Sunday 11-25 Auctions. Here is the link   Press the  shift key and the left side of the mouse.

    https://www.greatcollections.com/search.php?mode=product&series=34&page=3&pp=50

    There will be 20 coins per week for 6 weeks. Thanks for viewing and I hope you bid to get a few.

     

    Thanks

    Mark

    gemguy2u

     

     

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  22. JoeF
    Latest Entry

    recently acquired set of 1932 - 1964 Washington Quarters. seller stated that set was "informally graded by an independent third party and ranges are from MS-60 to MS-65." although I doubt the '36-D is MS.

    here's some pics made with digital point n shoot, so forgive the quality. to be clear, each obverse is followed by same coin's reverse.

    considering grading. opinions (especially of Washington collectors) are welcome. be kind.

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  23. I chronicled my first submission and the outcome here a few months ago, well I just mailed off my 2nd submission! Again, 19 coins and all from thailand.

    Last time I submitted 19 thai coins, I had 11 graded, 8 details. There were some coins I expected to get details and some I did not expect. I used the experience I learned from the last submission to carefully inspect my current submission..........hoping for no details grade!!!