1974 d penny copper
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21 posts in this topic

On 8/1/2021 at 7:34 PM, Geno g said:

Thanks man appreciate the info I guess people right lies out there 

Hey I went through so much bs out there until I landed here please use this resource as there are many smart people and I suggest following the forum and look how many times one or the other of the  folks answer the same questions. What is my coin worth?  You can read and post or just read for awhile. You will mostly get straight forward answers and once in awhile entertained 🤓

Edited by James Zyskowski
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As Oldhoopster said the rarity that the article references were experimental cents made of aluminum. Copper prices were erratic and increasing and the mint was looking for a more cost effective way to mint cents. Aluminum was experimented with but ultimately they made the switch to copper coated zinc, the crappy cents we have now, in 1982. Yours is the standard copper 1974 and is worth face value. 

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On 8/2/2021 at 3:12 AM, Jason Abshier said:

This bad boy is one they are referring to a trial strike made in off metal (aluminum) . Was supposed to be used for circulation but they found out aluminum was not what they wanted to used that plan was thrown out the door. 

A0060CA5-13E6-4998-B6E3-0E6FFAE1D0FF.jpeg

That is very very cool do you have the steelies as “roommates “ for the aluminum one 🤓 or is this a reference photo?

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On 8/2/2021 at 4:12 AM, Jason Abshier said:

This bad boy is one they are referring to a trial strike made in off metal (aluminum) . Was supposed to be used for circulation but they found out aluminum was not what they wanted to used that plan was thrown out the door. 

A0060CA5-13E6-4998-B6E3-0E6FFAE1D0FF.jpeg

This one (the D) was illegal to own and was confiscated by the Secret Service. There are about 20-ish Philly ones. Every one of them was “liberated” and not returned by Members of Congress. A crime never prosecuted. 
 

If you REALLY believe that “no one is above the law”, you are a foole. 

“Laws are for thee, not for me.”

Edited by VKurtB
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On 8/2/2021 at 3:38 PM, VKurtB said:

This one (the D) was illegal to own and was confiscated by the Secret Service. There are about 20-ish Philly ones. Every one of them was “liberated” and not returned by Members of Congress. A crime never prosecuted. 
 

If you REALLY believe that “no one is above the law”, you are a foole. 

“Laws are for thee, not for me.”

@VKurtB I’ve read a few stories on 1974 aluminum cent I see them as trial pieces or pattern off struck metal piece they shipped them to members of Congress , one was found on floor by an officer who worked there he saw a congressman drop a coin out of his pocket he tried to give it back but the congressman said Nah ! Keep it ! They treated it like it was scrap ! Now government is crying they want them back because they see price tag and small market of “deep pocket high caliber rich collectors” who will buy that in a heartbeat… so many stories hard to believe what is what but I do believe our government is a greedy %#%**% when it comes to our coin collecting hobbies … after all why they don’t they go after people for “owning” pattern pieces that weren’t meant for the public to own or private ownership ? Yet we see odd strange pattern pieces for sale from time to time 

Edited by Jason Abshier
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On 8/2/2021 at 4:58 PM, Jason Abshier said:

@VKurtB I’ve read a few stories on 1974 aluminum cent I see them as trial pieces or pattern off struck metal piece they shipped them to members of Congress , one was found on floor by officer who worked there he saw a congressman drop a coin out of his pocket he tried to give it back but the congressman said Nah ! Keep it ! They treated it like it was scrap ! Now government is crying they want them back because they see price tag and small market of “deep pocket high caliber rich collectors” who will buy that in a heartbeat… so many stories hard to believe what is what but I do believe our government is a greedy %#%**% when it comes to our coin collecting hobbies … after all why they don’t they go after people for “owning” pattern pieces that weren’t meant for the public to own or private ownership ? Yet we see odd strange pattern pieces for sale from time to time 

I think it’s because the Mint originally SOLD the patterns in byegone days. I’ve held in my grubby paws the “new” stainless steel “nickel” (5 cent piece) patterns. We were warned that no one was allowed to leave the room until all were accounted for. Different times. 
 

Oh, there’s one problem with the stainless steel 5 cent pieces - getting nice proof mirrors. Nickel plating may be required for proofs.  

Edited by VKurtB
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On 8/2/2021 at 3:08 PM, James Zyskowski said:

That is very very cool do you have the steelies as “roommates “ for the aluminum one 🤓 or is this a reference photo?

It’s a Reference photo this is illegal to own ,if it was legal to own and sell it worth upward $200,000 or more  . If I had it ? FBI , CIA would be shooting smoke grenades in my house windows shooting pepper spray in my eyes shooting me we rubber bullets while I’m sitting on the computer looking at coins caught me off guard . 
 

however there is also a 1942 aluminum cent  #J2079 pattern piece 

C87F9E78-4577-400E-8782-043A24197B7F.jpeg

Edited by Jason Abshier
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On 8/2/2021 at 6:10 PM, Jason Abshier said:

It’s a Reference photo this is illegal to own ,if it was legal to own and sell it worth upward $200,000 or more  . If I had it ? FBI , CIA would be shooting smoke grenades in my house windows shooting pepper spray in my eyes shooting me we rubber bullets while I’m sitting on the computer looking at coins caught me off guard . 
 

however there is also a 1942 aluminum cent  #J2079 pattern piece 

C87F9E78-4577-400E-8782-043A24197B7F.jpeg

Assuming that’s a recent photo, it has been WELL taken care of. 

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@RWB I believe I saw was writing a book about many of the recent experimental pieces. If memory serves it will feature a large amount of strange metals and other materials considered for coins. 

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On 8/1/2021 at 9:54 PM, James Zyskowski said:

 You will mostly get straight forward answers and once in awhile entertained 🤓

At least there are some who still appreciate my sense of humor.  🐓

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On 8/2/2021 at 9:58 PM, Woods020 said:

@RWB I believe I saw was writing a book about many of the recent experimental pieces. If memory serves it will feature a large amount of strange metals and other materials considered for coins. 

The article/book (however it turns out) covers approximately 1836 to 1895. It is an exploration of how, when, who and why of restriking coins and pattern pieces. I am presently in early drafts of various sections largely divided by directorships - that's simply how the story lines fall into place. (I was asked to do a presentation/web session on this in October, but I don't feel I will have enough corroboration to present conclusions. After all, there's already more than a century of assumption and misinformation on the subject and I don't want to add more.)

The piece Jason mentioned is illustrated and described in my book Pattern and Experimental Pieces of WW-II. The correct variety numbers are: RB 42-16 for normal thickness and RB 42-17 for double thickness. The Judd number is obsolete and its description is bogus. The designation by PCGS is an incorrect variety identification which PCGS has failed to change after repeated references to the WW-II pattern book.

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On 8/2/2021 at 6:02 PM, VKurtB said:

I’ve held in my grubby paws the “new” stainless steel “nickel” (5 cent piece) patterns.

Actual pattern or one of the testing pieces from nonsense dies?

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On 8/3/2021 at 2:17 PM, Conder101 said:

Actual pattern or one of the testing pieces from nonsense dies?

Neither. The alternate design with other words in the same fonts and placement for the legends and another portrait in place of ol’ TJ, but placed identically. 

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