Dot above date
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16 posts in this topic

Hey howdy and welcome to the forum. Interesting how things run in cycles but let me be first to say this’ll get interesting because lately we have had a rash of mystery mm and “unusual sightings “. Remember that you will get a lot of opinions while I’m fairly new I can testify that wait and sort them out. It’s a very good sign that you don’t see a “O” mint mark above the first 9. Thank you for posting.  It certainly is symmetrical    🤓

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I believe it's just some type of random die damage.  Maybe it was hit with a tool or something.  I don't believe it's a die chip (too uniform), nor do I believe it was intentional.  if it was some type of intentional mark, I would expect it to be centered around something, not just a random location.

 

Just my thoughts.

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On 7/24/2021 at 1:29 AM, Woods020 said:

Is this raised? Or just incuse? If incuse it could be a punch mark someone did for fun. If raised it’s interesting.

It is indeed raised

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Is it bonded or does it flow seamlessly into the field of the coin? Probably hard to tell with that much circulation. If it's not bonded then I'd go with a die chip/damage that over time or at one time took a hit/s and pressed the defect down forming it into a circular shape. I'm a little surprised that if it is a die chip it's not more well known and maybe it is with cent collectors. 

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On 7/24/2021 at 11:21 AM, Greenstang said:

Round Die Chips are not uncommon. They start off as a pin hole in the die and through continuous striking, it slowly enlarges the hole into a round shape.  

I have a stack of new pennies that have a chip on the E of CENT. At first I thought it was crappy zinc bubble but after finding 15 there was no doubt in my mind it was a chip. But my mind is not as chipper as it used to be either.  

S20210323_0002.jpg

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Die chips and similar surface defects are very rarely uniform geometric figures. The OP's dot seems too close to circular to be a natural occurrence. Would need to see a sharper image at greater magnification.

Steel dies spall or fracture along crystal boundaries - these are almost never circular.

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On 7/24/2021 at 1:55 PM, RWB said:

Die chips and similar surface defects are very rarely uniform geometric figures. The OP's dot seems too close to circular to be a natural occurrence. Would need to see a sharper image at greater magnification.

Steel dies spall or fracture along crystal boundaries - these are almost never circular.

I don’t have the best camera but hopefully these helps?

E1627F47-C614-4175-8AF8-DB7AB7770B56.jpeg

E463F7BA-E4B6-4B41-A439-847F229891B5.jpeg

7B4AFF6D-634E-4740-B04F-56456EE55B83.jpeg

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