Engraver game
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110 posts in this topic

4 hours ago, zadok said:

yep he did set of patterns on dime quarter half, there a set in the smithsonian collection...

I can't wait to get a chance to go to the Smithsonian. That would be so amazing. I would love to own a museum. You couldn't beat me out of it. Unless the flatheads were biting good of course. Other than that I would just walk around and enjoy the history all day. Would be very enjoyable seeing the smiles on all the children's faces as they enjoyed learning about all the amazing events and relics of the past. 

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Ok as a tribute to RWB and one of his books I’ll crudely paraphrase into a question. Somewhat similar to a previous question. 
 

This engraver spent his final years on the job engraving, begrudgingly, new designs to replace his legacy. 

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27 minutes ago, Woods020 said:

Ok as a tribute to RWB and one of his books I’ll crudely paraphrase into a question. Somewhat similar to a previous question. 
 

This engraver spent his final years on the job engraving, begrudgingly, new designs to replace his legacy. 

I'll have to think about this one for a few. I just read one of his books and it talked about a few of them. 

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2 hours ago, Hoghead515 said:

I'll have to think about this one for a few. I just read one of his books and it talked about a few of them. 

I’ll give you a hint because my clue is probably not very good. It was referenced in Renaissance of American Coinage 1909-1915

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Just now, Woods020 said:

I’ll give you a hint because my clue is probably not very good. It was referenced in Renaissance of American Coinage 1909-1915

I'll do some studying and see if I can't figure it out. Unless someone gets it before I do. 

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2 minutes ago, Hoghead515 said:

I'll do some studying and see if I can't figure it out. Unless someone gets it before I do. 

And of course I gave you the wrong book. It was actually in the 1905-1908 volume. 

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Just now, Woods020 said:

And of course I gave you the wrong book. It was actually in the 1905-1908 volume. 

I'd a been trying figure it out for a month. Lol

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Yes sir. Charles Barber had to spend the last part of his career engraving design to replace his namesake coins. And he wasn’t treated very well by some of the designers or president Roosevelt.  Kind of feel bad for him in a way. But he also wasn’t the most skilled engraver of the list. 

Edited by Woods020
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Let's try another. This engraver engraved Centennial medal for Philadelphias US International Exposition and the Grant second inaugural medal. Who is he?  Anyone can play. If you know the answer then type er in. 

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The early Whitman folders for the 1892 silver coins were titled "Morgan" type. When the company did finally acknowledge Barber as the designer his first name was given as James instead of Charles. It wasn't until Ken Bressett joined Whitman that the many inaccuracies were corrected in the early 1960s. The whole story is told in detail in my book on Whitman albums and folders.

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3 minutes ago, DWLange said:

The early Whitman folders for the 1892 silver coins were titled "Morgan" type. When the company did finally acknowledge Barber as the designer his first name was given as James instead of Charles. It wasn't until Ken Bressett joined Whitman that the many inaccuracies were corrected in the early 1960s. The whole story is told in detail in my book on Whitman albums and folders.

Thank you for the info. I'll have to give your book a read. I find stuff like that very interesting.  

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On 4/26/2021 at 4:27 PM, Hoghead515 said:

I can't wait to get a chance to go to the Smithsonian. That would be so amazing. I would love to own a museum. You couldn't beat me out of it. Unless the flatheads were biting good of course. Other than that I would just walk around and enjoy the history all day. Would be very enjoyable seeing the smiles on all the children's faces as they enjoyed learning about all the amazing events and relics of the past. 

Let us know when you plan on visiting the Smithsonian. Its a nice exhibit. Do you ever attend the Baltimore show? Maybe one of these days a few of us can meet in person there --thinking of @goldfinger1969 among others. it's a bit of a drive, but a good show.

 

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Just now, Zebo said:

Let us know when you plan on visiting the Smithsonian. Its a nice exhibit. Do you ever attend the Baltimore show? Maybe one of these days a few of us can meet in person there --thinking of @goldfinger1969 among others. it's a bit of a drive, but a good show.

 

I've never been yet.  Hopefully I can go here in the near future. That would be alot of fun. 

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On 4/25/2021 at 8:49 PM, RWB said:

Who designed/engraved the Barber dollar and the Morgan dime?

Rank amateur that I am and chiffonier that I shall always be, I am going to guess the designer/engraver is the person to whom was accorded the honor of having his moniker (or is it his monogram) included in the grand design of things.  I suppose I could look it up -- you've asked that question three times already -- but I don't want to cheat and sully my reputation as a low key Rooster meister.

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On 4/29/2021 at 10:11 PM, DWLange said:

The early Whitman folders for the 1892 silver coins were titled "Morgan" type. When the company did finally acknowledge Barber as the designer his first name was given as James instead of Charles. It wasn't until Ken Bressett joined Whitman that the many inaccuracies were corrected in the early 1960s. The whole story is told in detail in my book on Whitman albums and folders.

A much recommended book if you want to get the flavor of real-world coin collecting.It's about what the ordinary person did and used and enjoyed without a big budget and with a great deal of pleasure. It's about the opposite of boasts, big egos and greed in the hobby; this is the part of our hobby that preserved all the AU and lower grade coins that now populate the real heart of numismatics.

RWB

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Here's another engraver quiz question.

Which member of the US Mint Engraving Department spent their career making foliage and logos, yet was Acting Engraver on many occasions?

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A much recommended book if you want to get the flavor of real-world coin collecting.

Thanks for the endorsement, Roger. It was a very fun book to research and write.

I still have all of my circulated coins in Whitman Bookshelf albums from the 1960s. They were and are class with a capital K.

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Posted (edited)
5 hours ago, RWB said:

Here's another engraver quiz question.

Which member of the US Mint Engraving Department spent their career making foliage and logos, yet was Acting Engraver on many occasions?

Is it William Kneass?

Edited by Hoghead515
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6 hours ago, RWB said:

Here's another engraver quiz question.

Which member of the US Mint Engraving Department spent their career making foliage and logos, yet was Acting Engraver on many occasions?

Reich or Rieck something like that

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