Cherry Pickers Post
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215 posts in this topic

21 minutes ago, Lem E said:

The reeding on the edge was even still a little sharp. Thought maybe a mint set had been broken up or something and spent. Who knows. Now it’s in a flip.

I’d be willing to bet that 1993 quarter weighs a little heavy. It takes extra metal to so lavishly squeeze into the die recesses. 

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5 minutes ago, VKurtB said:

I’d be willing to bet that 1993 quarter weighs a little heavy. It takes extra metal to so lavishly squeeze into the die recesses. 

I was surprised to see the chest feather detail. You may very well be right about the weight. It is a nice strike.

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Posted (edited)

GBrad sorry the post is about errors and I forgot to add something 🤪long weekend. Had this guy for a little while. Love the centering of dime
 

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Edited by James Zyskowski
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Posted (edited)
2 hours ago, J P Mashoke said:

Would some of you call this a 1958 high D MM ?

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It’s definitely up there. Unless the MM is touching any of the devices there’s not a premium. Hand punched MM. Pretty neat though. I have one just like this I found awhile back. 

Edited by GBrad
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So it is my understanding there are two types of Peace Dollars in 1922 a low relief and a hi relief. How can you tell the difference is it only for the Philadelphia Mint? My 1922 S is a bit beat up, but I should look so good after 100 years 

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Posted (edited)
19 minutes ago, J P Mashoke said:

So it is my understanding there are two types of Peace Dollars in 1922 a low relief and a hi relief. How can you tell the difference is it only for the Philadelphia Mint? My 1922 S is a bit beat up, but I should look so good after 100 years 

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High relief 1922 peace dollars are extremely rare. Originally some 35k were produced but only a handful made it out of the mint. They changed from high relief to low in 22 and beyond. @RWB is the peace guru and is researching a new book on them currently. He will have a more detailed explanation for you 

Edited by Woods020
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3 minutes ago, Woods020 said:

It may be the lighting but that coin looks whizzed as well. 

 I polish it every night .:roflmao:

Yes I also think it may have been cleaned. I got it that way. When I bought some coins I got from a dealer in NC he threw it in as a freebee after I spent $100.

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22 hours ago, Woods020 said:

It may be the lighting but that coin looks whizzed as well. 

The USB Magnifying glass makes it look shinier than it really is. Here is a phone shot more what it looks like. But I think it has been dipped at the very least. I only have two Peace Dollars and the other one is dirty in all the hard to clean areas.lol

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Posted (edited)

I picked up a first issue 1965 SMS set today with all the paperwork It was not $5 but $13 was ok by me .

I was wondering if anyone knows? Almost every Kennedy half's I have ever seen have a copper edge and this one does not. I know they are 40% silver from 65 to 70 But did they use real silver on some of the first SMS sets for the Half Dollar ?? 

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Edited by J P Mashoke
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Posted (edited)

Here is another shot the Half does not look clad at all it looks silver. Is there any way to find out other than breaking the package and weighing the half dollar by itself? 

1965 silver.jpg

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Edited by J P Mashoke
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8 hours ago, J P Mashoke said:

Here is another shot the Half does not look clad at all it looks silver. Is there any way to find out other than breaking the package and weighing the half dollar by itself? 

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Generally you can see the layers on the rims, but there are instances where you can’t. There can be more/less of the silver in certain areas and it has been know to make the rims looks fully silver. You can weigh it. 40% should weigh 11.5 grams with a slight variance. A 90% silver will weigh more at 12.5 grams 

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There is some trick with toilet paper I’ve seen people mentioned but I don’t know how reliable it is between 40% and 90%. The clad coins appear darker and silver coins lighter through the toilet paper. Again don’t know it that will work here or not. 

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Most any description of Kennedy halves lists the composition of those minted from 1965 - 1970 as "40% Silver, 60% Copper." While this is technically true, it does not tell the whole story. They are actually minted from a "silver-clad sandwich," consisting of outer layers of .800 Silver and .200 Copper, bonded to a core of .209 Silver and .791 Copper. This works out to the 60/40 ratio that all the information sources have listed. It also means that they look like they contain more silver than they actually do, since the surface that you see is 80% silver. As Wood said, the edges will often show faint layers of the cladding, but it may sometimes be hard to see.

This does not mean that it is impossible to have a wrong-planchet error, where the coin was struck on a leftover 1964 90% silver planchet - I think there has been one or more of these actually discovered -  but, the odds are very slim, and you should assume your coin is normal until proven otherwise. 

 

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Thanks 

6 hours ago, Just Bob said:

Most any description of Kennedy halves lists the composition of those minted from 1965 - 1970 as "40% Silver, 60% Copper." While this is technically true, it does not tell the whole story. They are actually minted from a "silver-clad sandwich," consisting of outer layers of .800 Silver and .200 Copper, bonded to a core of .209 Silver and .791 Copper. This works out to the 60/40 ratio that all the information sources have listed. It also means that they look like they contain more silver than they actually do, since the surface that you see is 80% silver. As Wood said, the edges will often show faint layers of the cladding, but it may sometimes be hard to see.

This does not mean that it is impossible to have a wrong-planchet error, where the coin was struck on a leftover 1964 90% silver planchet - I think there has been one or more of these actually discovered -  but, the odds are very slim, and you should assume your coin is normal until proven otherwise. 

 

 

11 hours ago, Woods020 said:

Generally you can see the layers on the rims, but there are instances where you can’t. There can be more/less of the silver in certain areas and it has been know to make the rims looks fully silver. You can weigh it. 40% should weigh 11.5 grams with a slight variance. A 90% silver will weigh more at 12.5 grams 

Thanks . I hate to open the factory pack to weigh a coin that may be what it is meant to be. But if it was a change over error what a find it would be LoL

I saw a machine a coin dealer on YouTube had that showed the content of silver right through a holder.

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We went shopping today. LoL Trying to finish off the set of regular strikes ASE's we are missing the 2007 and the 2018. But my wife saw this 2007 Proof in a case so we got it. It is the last year of the U without a tail so I guess it is all right .

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2007 Back.jpg

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15 hours ago, J P Mashoke said:

Thanks 

 

Thanks . I hate to open the factory pack to weigh a coin that may be what it is meant to be. But if it was a change over error what a find it would be LoL

I saw a machine a coin dealer on YouTube had that showed the content of silver right through a holder.

Yes there is tech that can determine metal content through the holder. The XRF machines are very expensive, but many jewelers have them. If you really have a curiosity a jeweler might scan it for a fee.

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I found this hiding in a old roll of pennies . It looks like the copper has infected the dime and toned it out. I wonder how long that was in the roll. Cant be more than 4 years from the date of the dime.

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On 5/17/2021 at 7:00 PM, James Zyskowski said:

GBrad sorry the post is about errors and I forgot to add something 🤪long weekend. Had this guy for a little while. Love the centering of dime
 

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6 hours ago, James Zyskowski said:

 

Welcome James, Are we looking at a dent on a dime or for something else??

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Its a partial strike planchette nice and flat. Just top of Head on one side and “. dime “nicely placed and centered on reverse. Sorry about lack of professional terms but ya it’s kinda cool 😎 

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2 hours ago, James Zyskowski said:

Its a partial strike planchette nice and flat. Just top of Head on one side and “. dime “nicely placed and centered on reverse. Sorry about lack of professional terms but ya it’s kinda cool 😎 

Thats ok, I still call stuff what it looks like. We get a lot of coin pictures here that are damaged after they come out of the US Mint it is called PMD and most of the time it is a coin that has been changed in some way by man or machine. So yours is a blank dime planchet with only that small part of the dime showing on it, is that correct.

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@James Zyskowski It's a shame a perfectly good planchet -- weight-wise, metal miscegenation, depth, diameter and polish -- was so rudely marred by the graffiti artist, "DIME" whose "creations" will never rival those of TAKI 183.  :makepoint:

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Posted (edited)

It's a Rainy 3 day Memorial Day Weekend here on Cape Cod. You do not want to go out there in a car and try to drive anywhere. Just looking for a little sun or maybe a rainbow .So I am crashing and going through a jar of 1970 and 1960 Pennies. and I found a rainbow LoL It's not worth anything but it's pretty. I think the jar the pennies are in is worth more than all the pennies put together look at the expiration date.:roflmao: 

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Edited by J P Mashoke
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