? Wood looking penny
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73 posts in this topic

1 hour ago, Sharann said:

Done. Ordered it from Whitman. Thanks a bunch! 

Your gonna like that album. They are very fun to fill up. Trying to find the coins for them. Good luck to you my friend. Hope you find some good ones. Happy hunting. 

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2 hours ago, JKK said:

Mainly it was a teaching point, since you're eager to learn. It's got a patina, but it might still have luster. The main detractor is not wear, but what could be corrosion. If it were my coin and I liked it, I'd magnify it so I could examine the discoloring and see if it were copper corrosion (bad) or just dark toning spots (interesting). I'd also look at the fields under mag, to see if the circulation dings were legion, hunt for any residual mint luster.

Hey. Are you there? @JKK

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2 hours ago, Sharann said:

I am sure all would love to hear your theory if you'd like to share. You don't necessarily have to prove one wrong to have another. 

Most here have read it before and few agreed with it. 

Until it can be proven that the different colors are caused by differing metal content I will say it is just toneing no different than the different colors seen on silver

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2 hours ago, Lem E said:

Guess it was the black spots that caught my eye. I meant no disrespect. Its a fine looking piece. 

@Lem EI just want you to know that I did not even see those spots! Not until you mentioned them. I am so accustomed to looking at dirty coins that a coin will appear perfectly fine to me, when in fact it isn't. I appreciate your pointing that out because it helps me to learn and helps me to train my eyes to see deeper, I guess you could say. I appreciate ALL the feedback I get because that is the best way to learn. Please continue to correct me if I am wrong in any way at all. One day I may not have y'all around to ask and then there'd I'd be... Wishing someone had mentioned a black spot so I could've saved that time and money to boot. 

I don't take constructive criticism to heart. Promise. Thanks again! Oh, and you never told me where you are from, lol. 

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14 minutes ago, JKK said:

From time to time. Why?

I am sorry. I lost all my text and it said so much important stuff. 😭 Anyway, I think one spot is corrosion because it appears to be a hole. The other spots, though slightly different, do not appear to gouge into the coin. I had it stated so much better in the essay that I lost, but you smell what I'm cooking don't ya? My skills are on vacay as far as pics go. Idk what is going on. 😎

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18 minutes ago, Sharann said:

@Lem EI just want you to know that I did not even see those spots! Not until you mentioned them. I am so accustomed to looking at dirty coins that a coin will appear perfectly fine to me, when in fact it isn't. I appreciate your pointing that out because it helps me to learn and helps me to train my eyes to see deeper, I guess you could say. I appreciate ALL the feedback I get because that is the best way to learn. Please continue to correct me if I am wrong in any way at all. One day I may not have y'all around to ask and then there'd I'd be... Wishing someone had mentioned a black spot so I could've saved that time and money to boot. 

I don't take constructive criticism to heart. Promise. Thanks again! Oh, and you never told me where you are from, lol. 

Sometimes minor defects are hard to see in hand to the naked eye. Taking pictures and having the ability to blow up or zoom in on things lets you see small imperfections. I am from east central Illinois by the way. Born and raised.

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35 minutes ago, Moxie15 said:

Most here have read it before and few agreed with it. 

Until it can be proven that the different colors are caused by differing metal content I will say it is just toneing no different than the different colors seen on silver

Okay. My next question is why are the lines perfectly straight? I am truly asking cause I sure don't know. 

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6 minutes ago, Lem E said:

Sometimes minor defects are hard to see in hand to the naked eye. Taking pictures and having the ability to blow up or zoom in on things lets you see small imperfections. I am from east central Illinois by the way. Born and raised.

Is one of your parents from the south? 

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17 minutes ago, Lem E said:

No Ma’am, they were not. I guess I may have a touch of the south in me. 

Well it is pleasant. I wouldn't complain a bit if you let it stay with ya. Lol. Another kindred spirit 😊

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29 minutes ago, JKK said:

Yeah, unfortunately, those look like corrosion with some surface loss. Might call it VF details, corroded.

Is there a way to stop the corrosion dead in its tracks?

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19 minutes ago, Sharann said:

Well it is pleasant. I wouldn't complain a bit if you let it stay with ya. Lol. Another kindred spirit 😊

Im old enough to where everything is pretty well baked in. Not quite “Y’all” southern, but just enough. (thumbsu

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4 minutes ago, Sharann said:

Is there a way to stop the corrosion dead in its tracks?

The answer is a qualified maybe. I realize that's not very clear. And in any case, very very few people have the ability to remove the surface damage that resulted, and none have a way to fix pitting. At least that I know of.

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51 minutes ago, Lem E said:

Im old enough to where everything is pretty well baked in. Not quite “Y’all” southern, but just enough. (thumbsu

As long as it's baked in we're good! Lol. Y'all have a good day now, ya hear? 

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52 minutes ago, JKK said:

The answer is a qualified maybe. I realize that's not very clear. And in any case, very very few people have the ability to remove the surface damage that resulted, and none have a way to fix pitting. At least that I know of.

Although it would probably yerbits appearance, since it isn't a high dollar coin and well in years won't be a coin at all... Why not just stick it in something that will at least stunt its corrosive properties? 😱😱

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1 hour ago, Sharann said:

Okay. My next question is why are the lines perfectly straight? I am truly asking cause I sure don't know. 

I think it is toneing. Is just a nice word for tarnish. Tarnish is caused by the metal being in a bad environment for too long of a time. So the next logical question is what was in the environment that caused the tarnish. The short answer is I do not know. 

I could speculate,however, and this works into my point of third hand research, that the coin was in contact with a corduroy type material for a long period and also exposed to an agent that caused the toneing. As parts of the coin was touching a material and parts not, the colors are different according  to the parts touching and the parts not touching.

Edit to ask if I am spelling toneing incorrectly?

Edited by Moxie15
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3 hours ago, Hoghead515 said:

Your gonna like that album. They are very fun to fill up. Trying to find the coins for them. Good luck to you my friend. Hope you find some good ones. Happy hunting. 

Thanks and I'll try to find some for you too. 

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3 minutes ago, Moxie15 said:

I think it is toneing. Is just a nice word for tarnish. Tarnish is caused by the metal being in a bad environment for too long of a time. So the next logical question is what was in the environment that caused the tarnish. The short answer is I do not know. 

I could speculate,however, and this works into my point of third hand research, that the coin was in contact with a corduroy type material for a long period and also exposed to an agent that caused the toneing. As parts of the coin was touching a material and parts not, the colors are different according  to the parts touching and the parts not touching.

Edit to ask if I am spelling toneing incorrectly?

And the fact that they are from different years, I will have to check about mints makes that lesser of a possibility. To me anyway. It is strange characteristic of some, I must say. 

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9 minutes ago, Moxie15 said:

I think it is toneing. Is just a nice word for tarnish. Tarnish is caused by the metal being in a bad environment for too long of a time. So the next logical question is what was in the environment that caused the tarnish. The short answer is I do not know. 

I could speculate,however, and this works into my point of third hand research, that the coin was in contact with a corduroy type material for a long period and also exposed to an agent that caused the toneing. As parts of the coin was touching a material and parts not, the colors are different according  to the parts touching and the parts not touching.

Edit to ask if I am spelling toneing incorrectly?

Please correct me if I am wrong but isn't that rainbow toning on silver caused by oxidation? If so, then the pennies would have had to have been accidentally "oxidized" , or whatever it is called, in virtually the same pattern but different years and places and I THINK that to be less probable than it having to do with something all coins have in common. I hope I said that where you can understand what I am trying to say, lol

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7 minutes ago, Sharann said:

And the fact that they are from different years, I will have to check about mints makes that lesser of a possibility. To me anyway. It is strange characteristic of some, I must say. 

Remember my scenario is just speculation, basically made up just now and given as a way the straight line tarnish may have happened. I have seen quite a few 'woodies' and have noticed two things 1. they are toned in many patterns of lines and swirls.  2. I have never seen one in a  gem or high grade uncirculated condition. Just because I have not seen then does not mean they do not exist.

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14 minutes ago, Sharann said:

Please correct me if I am wrong but isn't that rainbow toning on silver caused by oxidation? If so, then the pennies would have had to have been accidentally "oxidized" , or whatever it is called, in virtually the same pattern but different years and places and I THINK that to be less probable than it having to do with something all coins have in common. I hope I said that where you can understand what I am trying to say, lol

All tarnish is a type of oxidation. A one cent coin turning brown is due to oxidation. If the metal had been improperly mixed, and there a three metals used, copper, tin, and zinc, then would not the lighter colored metals show as slightly lighter reds in a high grade red coin?

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There is a thread ATS that is quite interesting on the woodgrain subject that I just read through. Quite a bit of reading and gets a little off topic at times but still good. Don’t really know if I got any definitive answers. Not sure if I am allowed to post the thread here or not??? 

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1 hour ago, Sharann said:

Although it would probably yerbits appearance, since it isn't a high dollar coin and well in years won't be a coin at all... Why not just stick it in something that will at least stunt its corrosive properties? 😱😱

It's not quite that simple, certain, or easy. I don't think most of the easy and safe ways would make a dent, but you can try acetone and distilled water soaks if you want. Just when they don't do a bit of good, please do recall that I said that was likely the case. Now if you want to start mixing borax and I think it's baking or washing soda, as in soaking for weeks consistently removing and renewing the solution, you may find that you have a coin you can seal with paste wax. Which would be its own problem. Me, I'd just buy a nicer example for 25 cents, but if you want to do it as a training exercise, you can have at it.
Now if you want a solution that's a real pain, try getting zinc rot off older zinc coins. Almost nothing works well.

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I believe these are roller marks, not an improperly mixed alloy.  These come from the strip rolling process.  Dirty or oily rollers can leave residue on the alloy strip, which will tone over time as regularly spaced, parallel lines.  

The woody cents are due to compositional variations in the original ingot.  The inhomogeneities In the melt take on random shapes as the alloy cools.  These regions get elongated during the rolling process but the likelihood of them having consistent thicknesses and spacing is very unlikely

I've seen a few examples of evenly spaced roller marks on 1980 and 1981 cents posted on the numismatic forums over the years.

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1 hour ago, Moxie15 said:

All tarnish is a type of oxidation. A one cent coin turning brown is due to oxidation. If the metal had been improperly mixed, and there a three metals used, copper, tin, and zinc, then would not the lighter colored metals show as slightly lighter reds in a high grade red coin?

I am still, in my childlike mind, wondering how the lines are so straight by accident. I keep thinking about cooking a hamburger on the grill and if it was the mixture of meat then it would be all over but the heat, or better yet the grill irons caused them. I really am trying to grasp what you are saying but I am having a little trouble.

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1 hour ago, Lem E said:

There is a thread ATS that is quite interesting on the woodgrain subject that I just read through. Quite a bit of reading and gets a little off topic at times but still good. Don’t really know if I got any definitive answers. Not sure if I am allowed to post the thread here or not??? 

Can any of my mentors answer this? Maybe it will give additional insight. 

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36 minutes ago, JKK said:

It's not quite that simple, certain, or easy. I don't think most of the easy and safe ways would make a dent, but you can try acetone and distilled water soaks if you want. Just when they don't do a bit of good, please do recall that I said that was likely the case. Now if you want to start mixing borax and I think it's baking or washing soda, as in soaking for weeks consistently removing and renewing the solution, you may find that you have a coin you can seal with paste wax. Which would be its own problem. Me, I'd just buy a nicer example for 25 cents, but if you want to do it as a training exercise, you can have at it.
Now if you want a solution that's a real pain, try getting zinc rot off older zinc coins. Almost nothing works well.

Well, this girl needs a maid! I do not long to clean anything, lol. I should be ashamed but I am really not. I am a little spoiled but that's okay too 😊 because I do the same to everyone around me. So, I would much rather just start this science experiment today and see how long it lasts the way it is and find some more as we go along. I do thank you for the information though. I came across a key date nickel, which turned out not to be the correct mint mark, but I couldn't see the mint mark at first to tell. So, I figured if coke would clean my battery cables then it would clean the nickel. It did help enough that I could see there was no mint mark so it was not what I was looking for (thank goodness). In cases such as that, what should I do? Message you? LOL. I just know you are always so excited to see my name😂😂

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I definitely wouldn't soak any coins in Coke, which contains phosphoric acid. I would almost never soak any coins in any acid.

At this point, I'm out on cleaning/decrapulating advice. The party line is that novices should never clean any coins. I agree with that party line in general and it is my advice to you (and every other new collector who is tempted to start soaking coins in corrosive liquids and suchlike). I wish I'd just said it in the beginning, and now I'm fixing my mistake. It's been a distracted day.

If you find yourself tempted, I recommend you save the crapulated or corroded coins separately, let your knowledge grow, and then when you know what you're doing with this, you'll at least gain your knowledge by experimenting on coins that weren't worth anything. By saving them, you'll have them handy and won't have to hunt up new ones.

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