1921 Capped Bust
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19 posts in this topic

6 minutes ago, Jacob S said:

Dang typos. Thank you. Would you be worried about the scratches on the right side of the obverse?

You're most welcome. If you mean at the rim on the far right, that area is a negative/detraction.

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2 hours ago, Jacob S said:

Dang typos. Thank you. Would you be worried about the scratches on the right side of the obverse?

To me that should not keep it from grading. Old Bust coins are allowed some imperfections. Like Mark said though......it is a slight distraction. I will look it up and see what JR # it is.

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1 hour ago, Dimeman said:

To me that should not keep it from grading. Old Bust coins are allowed some imperfections. Like Mark said though......it is a slight distraction. I will look it up and see what JR # it is.

I believe it is a JR-7. I will be sending it in if not more than to give it some extra protection. I am pretty new to collecting and appreciate everyone's help. 

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I think this is a nice looking coin, but my fear would be that NGC might net grade the coin for the damage on the rim.  My experience has been that most TPGs are consistently inconsistent when it comes to grading bust material.

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39 minutes ago, Jacob S said:

I believe it is a JR-7. I will be sending it in if not more than to give it some extra protection. I am pretty new to collecting and appreciate everyone's help. 

You are correct. It is a JR7 which is a R2. I personally think it will grade. Good luck on your submission.

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Very nice solid EF and certainly worth having authenticated and "graded" by a competent 3rd party. The clear centering dots on both sides are a nice bonus, and good "learning points."

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On 11/24/2020 at 1:08 PM, RWB said:

Very nice solid EF and certainly worth having authenticated and "graded" by a competent 3rd party. The clear centering dots on both sides are a nice bonus, and good "learning points."

At the risk of confirming my rank amateur status, I must say I have never ever seen "centering dots" and this is the very first time I have ever even heard of them -- and I have been collecting all manner of U.S. coins since Marilyn Monroe passed in 1962.

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3 hours ago, Quintus Arrius said:

At the risk of confirming my rank amateur status, I must say I have never ever seen "centering dots" and this is the very first time I have ever even heard of them -- and I have been collecting all manner of U.S. coins since Marilyn Monroe passed in 1962.

Centering dots were used quite often on early coinage and can be a key diagnostic for die marriages.  I can only speak for Bust halves which I collect, and they can be found on the obverse as in this case or on the reverse within the shield, which you can also see on this example.

Edited by jtryka
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3 hours ago, Quintus Arrius said:

At the risk of confirming my rank amateur status, I must say I have never ever seen "centering dots" and this is the very first time I have ever even heard of them -- and I have been collecting all manner of U.S. coins since Marilyn Monroe passed in 1962.

For many years a steel or pen compass was used to scribe guide circles for inscriptions and other hand-punched details. Usually, these guide lines and the center point were effaced from completed dies. Sometimes, possibly from haste, removal was incomplete. It is this surface abrasion that created most of the so-called "early proof" coins -- much like proof-like Morgans 50 years later.

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