Lighting techniques for coin photography - updated
3 3

103 posts in this topic

13,342 posts
6 hours ago, Insider said:

Thanks, I'll bet this is true for digital cameras also.   

It is not a function of the detector. Only the two things mentioned. (The tilt and skew capabilities of a standard view camera simply exploit these, they are not changed. The old 35mm tilt lenses offered only a small perspective correction. Rarely used and certainly not for the highest quality work.

Edited by RWB

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4,198 posts
1 hour ago, Insider said:

 

Are you from Texas?  I see a "Hook-em Horns" emoji.

What you could do for us that would save time (I trust you) until I do it would be to image a full coin with a digital camera that is tilted to the light. 

My camera is on a copy stand and calibrated to point the sensor perfectly parallel to my shooting surface.  I'm not going to muck that up for your tangential (and frankly unimportant to me) experiment.

I don't understand why you're beating this dead horse.  You have half a dozen very competent and well versed people who take full coin photographs telling you that you're wrong - and Mark Goodman (who literally wrote the book on numismatic photography) also agrees with us.  If you want to photograph a full coin your camera and coin should be in alignment so that the sensor and the coin are perfectly parallel.  Period.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
587 posts
20 minutes ago, brg5658 said:

My camera is on a copy stand and calibrated to point the sensor perfectly parallel to my shooting surface.  I'm not going to muck that up for your tangential (and frankly unimportant to me) experiment.

I don't understand why you're beating this dead horse.  You have half a dozen very competent and well versed people who take full coin photographs telling you that you're wrong - and Mark Goodman (who literally wrote the book on numismatic photography) also agrees with us.  If you want to photograph a full coin your camera and coin should be in alignment so that the sensor and the coin are perfectly parallel.  Period.

I understand fully.  I'll do the experiment because TILTING A COIN under a camera on a fixed stand is "child's play."  I'm going to use my fingers.

This is why I like to tip a coin... It helps me take horrible micrographs of characteristics I wish to show to others.

IMG_4754.JPG

IMG_4755.JPG

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
587 posts

PS  If things go my way (depth of field on a full coin),I'm going to post a great quiz using a digital camera that I'll call TIPPED OR NOT

Otherwise, I'll thank all of you :x(worship):golfclap:for  teaching me about digital photography and apologize for being so stubborn.  :taptaptap:.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
13,342 posts

Sorry, but tilting a coin is and excuse for not being in control of lighting.

As for the two tilted photos above, they are badly compromised by digital artifacts that IF anything is actually in focus, it can't be determined. (To see the artifacts, all one has to do is click the photos, then click the " + " magnifier. If you want more , save the image and enlarge it to see all the happy JPG compression stuff stacked like legos on a sunny day.)

There are a lot of excellent photography books - especially older ones based on film, where mere competence results in professional failure.

Edited by RWB

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
587 posts
15 hours ago, RWB said:

Sorry, but tilting a coin is and excuse for not being in control of lighting.

As for the two tilted photos above, they are badly compromised by digital artifacts that IF anything is actually in focus, it can't be determined. (To see the artifacts, all one has to do is click the photos, then click the " + " magnifier. If you want more , save the image and enlarge it to see all the happy JPG compression stuff stacked like legos on a sunny day.)

There are a lot of excellent photography books - especially older ones based on film, where mere competence results in professional failure.

LOL.  I can move the light/lights or move the coin.  Furthermore, I posted the images in gray so no one could complain BUT I should have known better.  :(

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
13,342 posts

Gray scale is fine. The artifacts prevent the image from showing the full resolution of the CCD and lens - that was my complaint. In other words, by using poor digital compression, you've lost much of the detail. (Note that this did not happen with film.)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2,216 posts

"Tilting" is important for examining a coin, critical even, but the needs of examination and photography are different, until and unless we get a standard moving picture format, something several people are working on. As long as we are getting a look at the entire coin in a photo, tilting is a fool's errand.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4,198 posts
1 hour ago, RWB said:

Gray scale is fine. The artifacts prevent the image from showing the full resolution of the CCD and lens - that was my complaint. In other words, by using poor digital compression, you've lost much of the detail. (Note that this did not happen with film.)

@Insider images (or micrographs as he calls them) look like cell phone images to me.  I don't know what he's using for these, but they are certainly not comparable to a full coin image taken by someone who has all of the settings properly adjusted. 

My images are shot in Canon Raw format with all "auto" processing turned off.  That's a whole other kettle of fish if we start talking about camera settings.  For coins, if you fill the sensor with the coin image - digital compression is a non-issue.  A full sensor image would need to be scaled down by 5 or 6 fold to post on a website, and that downsizing tends to smooth over digital relics (if you're using a proper resize algorithm).  Even if cropped at the size it comes out of the camera, magnification is more than would ever be needed to see whatever it is you're interested in.

Film indeed did not "suffer" from compression issues, but no matter how you photograph a coin, to post it on a digital venue like a website you will have to get the image into a digital format one way or another - either taking the photo in digital format initially, or scanning in a print or negative.  Digital cameras are not a hindrance to coin photography if you know what you're doing.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
13,342 posts

My little images do not come from the Nikon "raw." Mine are already dressed up. Naked pixels are not a pretty sight.

:)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2,216 posts
3 hours ago, RWB said:

My little images do not come from the Nikon "raw." Mine are already dressed up. Naked pixels are not a pretty sight.

:)

So you’re ignoring that the emperor has no clothes?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
587 posts

As of now, I'm still in the "dog house for the ignorant" as it is already Wed. and I have not been able to fool with the companies cameras.  I'm afraid I will remain in this position until I produce some full coin images.  Don't give up on me, I wish to be proven correct or not.  I will post something as soon as I can  but for now my mouth is full of crow (CHOKE, CHOKE, GURGLE) until I produce some images,  :roflmao:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
3 3