Soaking in Oil
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59 posts in this topic

2 minutes ago, VKurtB said:

Virtually NO coin, especially among cents, is a candidate for abrasive cleaning. Those with experience know immediately and reject them instantly.

I used a solution  called tarn x on a few cents I wasn't going to try and sell; Just to give the coins some appeal, That said I also read that orange pumice and a toothbrush works wonders...but I know the bristles would show some kind of damage....I'd prefer a micro towel and acetone for future works.

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4 minutes ago, rocket23 said:

 That said I also read that orange pumice and a toothbrush works wonders..

It would do a wonderful job of leaving hairlines and unnatural color.

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Don't ever clean your coins for submission. Pro graders can spot them a mile away. Nothing worse than having "cleaned" on the label. I once cleaned a cent with Kleen King. It was beautiful, but just didn't look right. I slid it in a cull roll and it is out there in the wild.

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11 hours ago, rocket23 said:

A smarter than me metallurgist suggested; Warm hot water with a salt/water softener mixture. Line the bottom with foil. And dip the coins in the solution. 

There is worse advice than this, but not MUCH worse. All of these "self help remedies" are recipes for disaster. I don't care if they did come from a metallurgist. We've all been there, done that, have the t-shirt. Listen or don't. It's your call, but remember, we warned you.

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1 minute ago, rocket23 said:

I agree. But if one is to sit on a coin old or not. Or shall I say not worth anything. What’s the harm in cleaning a coin worth a penny?

None whatsoever. Keep copious notes on what you did what you see. They will come in handy later.

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On 10/15/2020 at 8:59 PM, rocket23 said:

I used a solution  called tarn x on a few cents I wasn't going to try and sell; Just to give the coins some appeal, That said I also read that orange pumice and a toothbrush works wonders...but I know the bristles would show some kind of damage....I'd prefer a micro towel and acetone for future works.

Sorry - none of those will do anything except ruin the coin from a collector standpoint.

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You have to keep in mind that even new cents, which might be put in a hermetically sealed environment early on, tone in a specific way. When they are cleaned even exclusively chemically, the color is off, and dealers and graders can tell. 
 

If you look at 2009 cents that may have been in an album for 11 years now, the ones from a mint set have toned differently from the circulation strike version - different alloy. 

Edited by VKurtB
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1 hour ago, VKurtB said:

You have to keep in mind that even new cents, which might be put in a hermetically sealed environment early on, tone in a specific way. When they are cleaned even exclusively chemically, the color is off, and dealers and graders can tell. 
 

If you look at 2009 cents that may have been in an album for 11 years now, the ones from a mint set have toned differently from the circulation strike version - different alloy. 

Still my only point,which may be pointless, is that if you have coins just to keep,admire, which would an open mind prefer? a brown dirty coin or a cleaned coin worthy of a shelf?

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1 hour ago, rocket23 said:

Still my only point,which may be pointless, is that if you have coins just to keep,admire, which would an open mind prefer? a brown dirty coin or a cleaned coin worthy of a shelf?

A knowledgable mind would prefer the brown.

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2 minutes ago, Just Bob said:

Ditto, +1, and "Yeah, Buddy!"

Yup, it’s why so many American large cents are ruined. I’ve been “retoning” an otherwise nice 1844 in Manila paper for over 12 years now. It’s getting brown again, but there’s still some red. 

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On 10/11/2020 at 8:29 PM, KarenHolcomb said:

So I been soaking these in Olive Oil, Extra Virgin of course, for a year now. I just finished going through the last bit of my Memorial Coppers that I been saving and have nothing else besides World Coins to sort so I guess it's time to get the oil off these. They sure don't look any better than the 11th of last year.  

Next stop...the World is mine.

PXL_20201012_031950739~2.jpg

PXL_20201012_031956908~2.jpg

I never had much luck with olive oil either.

Some of the fuzzy green early Brit coppers improved a bit, but for most bronze/copper, it didn't do much at all.

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15 hours ago, VKurtB said:

You have to keep in mind that even new cents, which might be put in a hermetically sealed environment early on, tone in a specific way. When they are cleaned even exclusively chemically, the color is off, and dealers and graders can tell. 
 

If you look at 2009 cents that may have been in an album for 11 years now, the ones from a mint set have toned differently from the circulation strike version - different alloy. 

We used to roll our 8up 24"×36" litho film up with tissue between each sheet, roll it up, tape it with white artist tape, then hermetically seal the FedEx tube with clear shipping tape. Then ship it to World Color Press in St. Louis. That is how magazines were made before Apple computers came along and destroyed the litho film and magazine business in the 90's. Bastids. I had not seen the term "hermetically" since then, and I will never own an Apple anything to this day. No craftsmanship in the magazine business nowadays. Graphic Designers nowadays are like the kickers and punters on a football team. Little pencil necked pipsqueaks. I'm going to keeek a field goal. No idea what is like to be in the trenches.Sorry for the rant everybody, but it feels great to get that off my chest, but it is my honest opinion and I'm sticking to it. Where were we? Oh yeah my MS70 coins...

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6 hours ago, Conder101 said:

How many months/years did you allow them to soak?

Not more than about six months, but @KarenHolcomb soaked hers for a year and it looks like she has about the same result.

From your question though, I'm guessing the process must be a multi year endeavor.  

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16 minutes ago, ProfHaroldHill said:

Not more than about six months, but @KarenHolcomb soaked hers for a year and it looks like she has about the same result.

From your question though, I'm guessing the process must be a multi year endeavor.  

Isn't there a whole new olive harvest by then?

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On 10/15/2020 at 6:01 PM, rocket23 said:

I'm curious, mainly because I have no clue, but if a wheat penny has the tarnish removed and is virtually cleaned (even the nooks and crannies) how do you tell it's been cleaned??

 

On 10/15/2020 at 9:25 AM, Just Bob said:

I am curious to know if the exposed areas of any of the coins look different than the areas that were touching other coins.

No, JB. There was no change anywhere. Now after all this, I did squirt some UDDERLY SMOOTH on them and it was crazy how the lotion turned bright green and it did bring the roughcoat of grime and such off, it still left behind the patterns of the dirt behind.

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