1937 Buffalo Nickel... Mint Error, Planchet flaw, Both of the above, Or PMD?
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68 posts in this topic

On 10/6/2020 at 2:19 PM, Quintus Arrius said:

There is a significant (monumental) difference between the urgent insistence of a RichieRich2020-type bordering on hysteria and that of the cool, calm and collected approach of Prof. Hill who notably  informed readers he would get around to displaying the reverse side of the nickel featuring the bison, as one viewer requested, when he was so disposed!  How does one spell chutzpah? 😉

In the former, the owner, rendered opinions from some of the most learned authorities on the subject in the land, declined to accept their assessments; in the latter, my gut feeling as an accomplished troll who's jousted here with many of the principals involved, strongly suggests the good Prof. has the answer to the question he seeks but like a cat playing with a mouse, or mice, enjoys a game of chess with those whose minds display a full range of the specific skill sets needed to bring the chase to a fulfilling conclusion.

It's innocent inquiries such as these that inadvertently separate the contenders, i.e., the men of substance and honor, from what the author William S. Burroughs (deceased) derisively dismissed as the "set-up" man:  "I've been watching you.  You're the man I need for this set-up.  Now listen. . ." 

[The foregoing post is dedicated to the likes of "pi-guy," a/k/a physics-fan3.14 and his 36 like-minded moderator--wannabees.] 

And I haven't even posted pix yet of the 'third side' of the coin! (Corn WILL be popped!)

We bad.

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34 minutes ago, ProfHaroldHill said:

To answer the question you directed to me, I would say it was the fact that I once spent almost ten minutes on the phone with PCGS, (two different people, one a grader,) regarding a gold coin that I had just received back from them.

Granted, that was back in the early 1990's and maybe that has changed. Still, for some matters a detailed analysis need only be a few sentences.

 

 

That’s a few sentences more than I’d ever expect from any TPGS. ATS seems categorically incapable of providing more that a two digit number starting with a 9. At least with our hosts you get an English word or two. Often misspelled, such as “piefort” instead of “piedfort”, but still a word.

I’ve chalked it up to hiring millennials, to whom “speling is jus a thoery”. “Quality control” indeed. Don’t make me laugh.

Edited by VKurtB
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On 10/8/2020 at 4:06 PM, VKurtB said:

That’s a few sentences more than I’d ever expect from any TPGS. ATS seems categorically incapable of providing more that a two digit number starting with a 9. At least with our hosts you get an English word or two. Often misspelled, such as “piefort” instead of “piedfort”, but still a word.

I’ve chalked it up to hiring millennials, to whom “speling is jus a thoery”. “Quality control” indeed. Don’t make me laugh.

Whatever else anyone may be inclined to say about you, you sure know your French (piedfort) and as far as a departure from acceptable (standard) English spelling, grammar, punctuation, etc., I knew all was lost when a paper of record noted penmanship was no longer being taught in public schools.  It goes without saying slang, Twitter and social media hastened its demise.  That reality TV series, Growing up Gotti, featuring the incomprehensible conversations of John Gotti's sons was the death knell of spoken English when series consultants suggested English sub-titling would be needed to help viewers understand the gutter English that was bring spoken.  There had never been a more embarrassing display of illiteracy before or since.

 

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On 10/8/2020 at 3:42 PM, ProfHaroldHill said:

And I haven't even posted pix yet of the 'third side' of the coin! (Corn WILL be popped!)

We bad.

[I believe your 1937 Buffalo nickel comes closest to sides featuring both mesas and plateaus -- and we haven't even seen the third side yet.]

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The nickel is on its way to Insider for 'further review'.

This new image, (Salvador Dali-esque,) better shows the anomalous area. The perspective from the first obverse view, beneath, shows clearly there is no deformation, only missing metal. 

IMG_20201015_130601~3.jpg

IMG_20200924_150703~4.jpg

Edited by ProfHaroldHill
Dali 'Melting clock' reference added
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3 hours ago, ProfHaroldHill said:

The nickel is on its way to Insider for 'further review'.

This new image, (Salvador Dali-esque,) better shows the anomalous area. The perspective from the first obverse view, beneath, shows clearly there is no deformation, only missing metal. 

IMG_20201015_130601~3.jpg

IMG_20200924_150703~4.jpg

Upon further review...

image.jpeg.6167ccf4feae4ec8a4b2856b55d04acc.jpeg

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On 10/8/2020 at 12:42 PM, ProfHaroldHill said:

And I haven't even posted pix yet of the 'third side' of the coin! (Corn WILL be popped!)

We bad.

The edge anomalies are raised from the otherwise normal surface, which means they appeared post striking, and probably "post mint".

The question is, did the deformation cause the separation of one or both of the laminations(?)

Judging from the different levels of wear, I think the obverse lamination fell away soon after striking, while the reverse lamination, I believe, was forced from the coin during the deformation event. The coin, laid flat, has a slight 'tweak', corresponding to the two areas of deformation of the edges.

@Moxie15 may be correct in that the metal lamination could well have been knocked off the surface when the coin jammed in a machine.

In my opinion, this is a damaged error coin. I'm hoping the crew at ICG confirms that indeed the obverse and reverse missing metal is due to an inferior quality planchet, (a lamination error,) regardless of whether or not one of the laminations separated due to damage later in the coin's 'life'.

But why the curved line on the reverse, at the point of lamination? Could another nickel, wedged against it, being subjected to a powerful blow, sever the thin laminate layer of metal on the surface of this coin?

Or are those curved lines evidence of something as yet not deciphered, so to speak?

IMG_20201015_131504~2.jpg

IMG_20201015_132752~2.jpg

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Thats a very interesting coin. I read through your whole thread and its got me scratching my head. What you are saying makes alot of sense. May have been impure metal or something. I do alot of welding work and learned about impurities not letting the metal bond together correctly. Just my wild guess. I could be wrong. Im by far no expert.  

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