Need some help
1 1

11 posts in this topic

5 posts

Ok thanks.. I work at a convenient store and come across a lot of change. When I saw this I had to have it lol

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5,243 posts
1 hour ago, King T said:

Ok thanks.. I work at a convenient store and come across a lot of change. When I saw this I had to have it lol

Was this in the cash register? I am curious as to what value in US Dollars was placed on it if it was spent.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 posts

No not spent as change. A guy just came in and said he was working on a old house and came across it.. I bought it from him because I'd never seen one before.obviously didn't know what it was but as a collector I knew it was a rarity for me. Figured I wouldn't come across a coin like that often.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 posts

I know it's not worth much but it's a cool find.. I was thinking about sending it in to get grading just because it's different to my collection 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
193 posts

I would just put it in a holder and keep it.  It is a nice coin, but it would cost way more than the coin is worth to have it graded.  What I would do is spend the money it would have cost to grade it on another coin!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 posts

Yea that's makes better sense. I found a 1919 wheat penny. It was tore up, I'd love to have had that in mint state.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2,472 posts

King George V died in January of 1936, but by British custom the late monarch's portrait was retained until the following year. Just as all the tooling was ready to make dies for his successor, Edward VIII, the latter abdicated in December, and the Royal Mint had to start over again with new hubs and dies for George VI. These weren't ready for several months, so your penny may have been struck early in '37.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2,216 posts
30 minutes ago, DWLange said:

King George V died in January of 1936, but by British custom the late monarch's portrait was retained until the following year. Just as all the tooling was ready to make dies for his successor, Edward VIII, the latter abdicated in December, and the Royal Mint had to start over again with new hubs and dies for George VI. These weren't ready for several months, so your penny may have been struck early in '37.

That "strikes" me as a good story.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
1 1