100 Greatest Modern World Coins
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Has anyone purchased the 100 Greatest Modern World Coins book that came out earlier this year and won an award from the NLG?  I believe they reviewed issues of the twentieth century and not just those coins minted after 1965.

if so you purchased it - thoughts?  

China and Great Britain figure prominently in it among others.

This is follows the same format I believe as the other 100 Greatest books.

It might be interesting to debate whether you believe a coin or set (combination of great coins from the same series) should have been included or excluded from the list. A clear understanding of how they were selected should be discussed before any debates so that everyone is working off the same page. (Rarity, impact on the world, interesting aspects, or possibly a good story could be some of the criteria).

of course I would argue that the sovereign figure rather high. But I am getting ahead of myself.

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I have the 2011 Modern US Coins Version , signed by Scott Schechter himself. If it is similar, It should have a lot of very interesting info in it. I thought this version was a very cool book. I'll have to dig it out again look over some of the coins that I wasn't interested in at the time. This version covered coins from US Coins from 1964-2010. 

Edited by bsshog40
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2 minutes ago, bsshog40 said:

I have the 2011 Version , signed by Scott Schechter himself. It has a lot of very interesting info in it. I thought it was a very cool book. I'll have to dig it out again look over some of the coins that I wasn't interested in at the time. This version covered coins from 1964-2010. 

Since I opened my mouth about it - I just ordered the most recent edition. It's coming via media mail, however - so it may be a while before I can comment on it.

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Just now, Zebo said:

Since I opened my mouth about it - I just ordered the most recent edition. It's coming via media mail, however - so it may be a while before I can comment on it.

Did you notice I had to edit my post. I think you were referring to World Coins and I was referring to US Coins. Still a great book. Lol

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9 minutes ago, bsshog40 said:

Did you notice I had to edit my post. I think you were referring to World Coins and I was referring to US Coins. Still a great book. Lol

Nope - didn't notice. Thanks for the alert. Below is a decent write up,if anyone is interested:

100 Greatest Modern World Coins

By Charles Morgan and Hubert Walker; Foreword by Donald Scarinci.

 

Whitman Publishing LLC, 160 pages, lavishly illustrated, hardcover.

Rarely has a numismatic book published in modern times achieved the overall excellence displayed by this newest Whitman Greatest title. Authors Charles Morgan and Hubert Walker have collaborated with remarkable success in compiling their list of “Greatest” world coins produced since the opening of the 20th century.

The authors were (and still are) well aware of the controversies lying in wait for their exhaustive labors. Opening with a definition of “Greatest,” they determined that no single factor could place any coin in this rarified category. Several had to be considered for each coin listed, including history, beauty, popularity, quality, rarity, and value. Above all, they selected coins with a story, the key ingredient that makes any coin appealing to determined collectors. Every effort was made to widen the scrutiny of geographical regions and countries beyond a narrow Eurocentric focus. This has resulted in a relatively thorough examination of coins of the Far East, Asia, and Africa that have been so often ignored by mid-20th-century catalogers.

In this quest, certain historical figures loom larger than they might in traditional survey histories. British monarch George V, King of the United Kingdom and Emperor of India, appears repeatedly since during his reign (1911-1936) the British Empire reached its peak and began its transition into a Commonwealth. Thus, rarities in the still-new coinages of CanadaSouth Africa, and Australiareceive attention, illuminated by carefully chosen portraits of King George and such figures as Canada’s Governor-General Grey, South Africa’s S.J.P. Kruger, Generals J.B.M. Hertzog and Field Marshal Jan C. Smuts.

British mega-rarities illustrated and described include the never-issued 1937 Proofcoins prepared by The Royal Mint for King Edward VIII, subsequently the Duke of Windsor after his abdication and marriage to American divorcée Wallis Warfield Simpson. The coins were fatally delayed by the new king’s fuss over which way his head would face. All denominations are illustrated, from bronze farthing through gold five pounds.

Non-collectible British coins of more recent years include the 1953 Elizabeth II gold half sovereignsovereigntwo and five pounds – of which only three of each denomination were ever struck. Unlike her father’s 1937 coinage, no collector-only gold coins were to be struck, but photos of these great rarities are enough to fill any collector with hopeless yearning.

In its representation of Chinese, Korean, and Japanese rarities, this new book has no equal.

Chinese coverage is complicated by the authors’ decision to present transliterations of Chinese names and terms in the Pinyin rather than in the older Wade-Giles style. Generations of western numismatists were raised on the older method and it is a difficult adjustment to make. If adopted, however, the newer style will harmonize future numismatic publications with those in most other fields of study.

The Chinese rarities listed provide an unequaled roster of historic coinage. The accompanying portraits and artwork of the last emperors and such later figures as General, President, and almost-Emperor Yuan Shikai offer windows into a turbulent era of Chinese and world history. Much of the confusion dating back to pioneer Wayte Raymond and his compiler Howland Wood in creating the 1938 Coins of the World is resolved by the meticulous Morgan-Walker listings.

GERMAN EAST AFRICA. Wihelm II. 1916-T AV 15 Rupien. NGC MS65. Images courtesy Atlas NumismaticsElsewhere the authors’ resolve uncertainties in such once-puzzling areas as the gold coinage of modern Romania, where a 1940 six-coin gold set of King Carol II is superbly described and richly illustrated. Carol, “that bounder” to his British cousin King George V, issued these somewhat ostentatious coins in 1940 to celebrate his 10th anniversary on the throne that he usurped from his young son Michael. They proved to be Carol’s last coinage issues.

Among modern central European coinages, notice is taken to the early postwar coins of West Germany (Bundesrepublik Deutschland, “Federal”, not “People’s”, Republic) and East Germany, the “German Democratic Republic” (Deutsche Demokratische Republik), with a somewhat benign review of the latter, now vanished regime. The legendary wartime 1916 German East Africa gold 15 Rupien is presented but without mention of the remarkable colonial war waged under Col. Paul von Lettow-Vorbeck, who ended World War I during a successful invasion of British Rhodesia.

Italian rarities include both silver and gold issues of the numismatist king Victor Emmanuel III, who reigned 44 years through the most difficult of times, making his last act on Italian soil the gift of his vast collection to the Italian people. His son Umberto II succeeded him but the monarchy ended before coins could be prepared.

Among truly modern coins of exceptional historical interest but not earth-shattering rarities are the five 1991 Russian pieces inscribed GOSUDARSTVENNYI BANK SSSR (or the “State Bank of the USSR”), the last issues of a disappearing Soviet Unionthat soon after dissolved. Here is another example of an important but not overwhelmingly costly modern coin set.

Perhaps the most distinguished achievement, apparent throughout this book, is its successful emphasis on the Story behind each coin listed, regardless of market value or auction record. Not every collector may be able to obtain world-class rarities, but none can escape the inspiration of their tumultuous stories set forth so skillfully by Morgan and Walker.

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It isn't clear to me what time period it covers.  I do recall seeing a series of articles on Coin Week several years ago for a similar book.  If it's the same one, I disagreed with many of the entries.  As an example, one was a commemorative for Princess Diana.  It isn't a significant coin at all, it's a common NCLT.

Going by the above summary, seems like it is 20th century for this book.  If so, I'd agree that numerous British, Australian and South African coin should be in it.  However, I'd like to know what South African coins have portraits of Herzog and Smuts as there are none, not even patterns.

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1 hour ago, RWB said:

Have never been attracted to these picture books. Flipped through a few, but superficial. "Where's the Beef?"

I agree - but they do tend to get some people debating on the choices. This is an attempt to add a bit more interest to the forum -- an inch thick, but a mile wide. Serious discussions on the other hand are a mile deep.  We need the deep dives more than the others, but if we are going to try to bring in others and spur on conversations - let's try both.

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Well, no set of message boards will thrive with many "deep dive" threads. One shortage here is among the general level questions. Also, dividing newbie questions from the rest makes the board volume look less than it really is. I feel, however, that without some software improvements, the NGC boards will not have a chance to expand their participation.

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On 8/22/2020 at 12:33 PM, Zebo said:

Has anyone purchased the 100 Greatest Modern World Coins book that came out earlier this year and won an award from the NLG?  I believe they reviewed issues of the twentieth century and not just those coins minted after 1965.

if so you purchased it - thoughts?  

China and Great Britain figure prominently in it among others.

This is follows the same format I believe as the other 100 Greatest books.

It might be interesting to debate whether you believe a coin or set (combination of great coins from the same series) should have been included or excluded from the list. A clear understanding of how they were selected should be discussed before any debates so that everyone is working off the same page. (Rarity, impact on the world, interesting aspects, or possibly a good story could be some of the criteria).

of course I would argue that the sovereign figure rather high. But I am getting ahead of myself.

Mine arrived from Wizard Coin Supply on Saturday, while I was out at a local coin auction. In my opinion, the book has a few too many “impossible to own” coins included. Yes, they are great coins, and it’s nice to see them, but there are relatively few that any collector can ever own. So yes, it’s stout on rarity, but interesting and good story suffers.

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2 hours ago, VKurtB said:

Mine arrived from Wizard Coin Supply on Saturday, while I was out at a local coin auction. In my opinion, the book has a few too many “impossible to own” coins included. Yes, they are great coins, and it’s nice to see them, but there are relatively few that any collector can ever own. So yes, it’s stout on rarity, but interesting and good story suffers.

Guess I'll have to buy it to read the criteria, particularly when the cut-off for "modern" begins.  For European collectors, it seems to be anything dated about 1500 or later.  Otherwise, this is an arbitrary US centric term, as there is no distinction hardly anywhere else between "classics" and moderns" as used in the US.

To meet the definition of "great", I think it's ok to have coins almost impossible to acquire, to a point.  For world coinage though, I'd probably leave patterns out even though these are included in the US volume.  The cover also includes images of the gold Panda and Maple Leaf.  Neither is "great".

The big difference in world coinage is that, for a variety of reasons, there are many more rarities: lumping all other countries into one bucket is the first, but also lower mintages due to population and economics plus limited to no organized local collecting resulting in (much) lower survival rates.

Coins such as the 1934 New Zealand and 1926 South Africa proof sets are legitimate.  The first has a mintage of 20 but only one set reportedly in private hands. The second with a mintage of 16 has five sets known (plus a few more singles) out of a mintage of 16 with two sets available to be bought to my knowledge.  This isn't unusual for SA KGV sets, as all of the 1926-1936 had mintages of 62 or less.  These are examples only, as I don't know if either are included.

I have an old edition of the US 100 but I wouldn't consider many of the entries "great" either.  Some are Red Book die varieties which are rare as a date but multiple are included.  Others such as the 09-S VDB are "famous" but unless the intent is to intentionally include those which are affordable, I'd hardly rate it #9.  This is probably a reasonable ranking for it's prominence but it's not a "better" coin than the SM eagle reverse half dollar.  Personally, I would have used a broader definition of "US coin" to avoid what I described; using "US" coins not issued by the US Mint.

Edited by World Colonial
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5 minutes ago, World Colonial said:

Guess I'll have to buy it to read the criteria, particularly when the cut-off for "modern" begins.  For European collectors, it seems to be anything dated about 1500 or later.  Otherwise, this is an arbitrary US centric term, as there is no distinction hardly anywhere else between "classics" and moderns" as used in the US.

To meet the definition of "great", I think it's ok to have coins almost impossible to acquire, to a point.  For world coinage though, I'd probably leave patterns out even though these are included in the US volume.  The cover also includes images of the gold Panda and Maple Leaf.  Neither is "great".

The big difference in world coinage is that, for a variety of reasons, there are many more rarities: lumping all other countries into one bucket is the first, but also lower mintages due to population and economics plus limited to no organized local collecting resulting in (much) lower survival rates.

Coins such as the 1934 New Zealand and 1926 South Africa proof sets are legitimate.  The first has a mintage of 20 but only one set reportedly in private hands. The second with a mintage of 16 has five sets known (plus a few more singles) out of a mintage of 16 with two sets available to be bought to my knowledge.  This isn't unusual for SA KGV sets, as most of the 1926-1936 had mintages of 62 or less.  These are examples only, as I don't know if either are included.

I have an old edition of the US 100 but I wouldn't consider many of the entries "great" either.  Some are Red Book die varieties which are rare as a date but multiple are included.  Others such as the 09-S VDB are "famous" but unless the intent is to intentionally include those which are affordable, I'd hardly rate it #9.  This is probably a reasonable ranking for it's prominence but it's not a "better" coin than the SM eagle reverse half dollar.  Personally, I would have used a broader definition of "US coin" to avoid what I described; using "US" coins not issued by the US Mint.

I believe the World book covers only the twentieth century. Kurt can confirm since he has his copy already. Also Great doesn't always refer to rare. I believe that a good story and popularity of the coin or impact adds into it. I'm also interested in seeing what the criteria was in choosing them. In any event, there will be numerous disagreements why something was on the list or not. it might be of interest to some of the member and non-members for some debate to occur. Trying to add interest and/or involvement in this forum. 

My copy should be arriving soon. Wonder how long media mail takes these days. 

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Just now, Zebo said:

I believe the World book covers only the twentieth century. Kurt can confirm since he has his copy already. Also Great doesn't always refer to rare. I believe that a good story and popularity of the coin or impact adds into it. I'm also interested in seeing what the criteria was in choosing them. In any event, there will be numerous disagreements why something was on the list or not. it might be of interest to some of the member and non-members for some debate to occur. Trying to add interest and/or involvement in this forum. 

My copy should be arriving soon. Wonder how long media mail takes these days. 

I agree with you that rare does not equal "great".  I use rarity in many of my comments on coin forums but it's not my only criteria for distinction or importance.

Perhaps nick picking but probably my disagreement will mostly be from the title.  When I think of "great", I equate it with "distinction" or my perception of collector preference ranking. 

As I stated many times, there is a difference between "popular" measured by the size of the collector base and an actual collector preference.  The 09-S VDB is more "popular" than the SM eagle reverse half.  It is and always has been a "moon shot" away from collectors preferring it as they never did, not even close.  This applies even more to gold pandas and maple leaf where an outsized proportion of the "collector" base is probably financial buyer as opposed to hobbyist.

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2 hours ago, World Colonial said:

Yes, 2019 Coin Week review says it starts with 1901, a rather arbitrary date for world coinage per my prior comment.

Considering the 1899 and 1900 French 20-franc gold roosters, the first and second years of mintage, are also its rarest issues, this would be a personal travesty for me. Then again, "greatness" is in the eye of the beholder.

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43 minutes ago, Quintus Arrius said:

Considering the 1899 and 1900 French 20-franc gold roosters, the first and second years of mintage, are also its rarest issues, this would be a personal travesty for me. Then again, "greatness" is in the eye of the beholder.

How rare are the two issues and what would make them great? Are they unique or close to it? Do they have a story behind them that makes them widely popular or interesting? What impact did they play on the world scene? 

Just asking - I don't know anything about roosters except the kind on the farm across the street. They did seem somewhat in demand at the last local coin show I attended. 

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50 minutes ago, Quintus Arrius said:

Considering the 1899 and 1900 French 20-franc gold roosters, the first and second years of mintage, are also its rarest issues, this would be a personal travesty for me. Then again, "greatness" is in the eye of the beholder.

Quintus - since its Labor Day already (just joking), would you be interested in describing your collection and then engaging in a Q&A session?

i know I'd be interested.

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54 minutes ago, Quintus Arrius said:

Considering the 1899 and 1900 French 20-franc gold roosters, the first and second years of mintage, are also its rarest issues, this would be a personal travesty for me. Then again, "greatness" is in the eye of the beholder.

No one is completely impartial but I try not to let my personal preference influence my opinions on this type of subject.

From what I know of this series which isn't much, I wouldn't put any in the top 100.  The series has a much lower preference than the sovereign (as do French versus British coins generally) and is almost certainly a lot more common versus dates such as the 1916C and 1923 SA.

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10 minutes ago, Zebo said:

How rare are the two issues and what would make them great? Are they unique or close to it? Do they have a story behind them that makes them widely popular or interesting? What impact did they play on the world scene? 

Just asking - I don't know anything about roosters except the kind on the farm across the street. They did seem somewhat in demand at the last local coin show I attended. 

Actually, I was just lamenting the fact that if they exuded greatness, the cut-off date would preclude them from consideration. 

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10 minutes ago, Zebo said:

Quintus - since its Labor Day already (just joking), would you be interested in describing your collection and then engaging in a Q&A session?

i know I'd be interested.

A free-wheeling discussion? An interrogatory?  VKurtB, among others, would absolutely, positively not allow it!  Out of the question.  

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12 minutes ago, World Colonial said:

No one is completely impartial but I try not to let my personal preference influence my opinions on this type of subject.

From what I know of this series which isn't much, I wouldn't put any in the top 100.  The series has a much lower preference than the sovereign (as do French versus British coins generally) and is almost certainly a lot more common versus dates such as the 1916C and 1923 SA.

I wouldnt mind learning about your collection as well. I am sure it would be interesting - especially with the trials and tribulations that you have to overcome finding some of the issues.

i know very little of the series.

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16 minutes ago, World Colonial said:

From what I know of this series which isn't much, I wouldn't put any in the top 100. 

I haven't the foggiest -- I only collect them, or did. On my desk, in my hand-printing, is a table with years, Mint state conditions, and the census figures of TPGS, updated monthly. I have been unable to upgrade due to lack of availability in the top grades. Complicating matters is a great deal of speculation as to how many such coins were melted and when. The vast majority of upper fringe coins do not reside in any Set Registry. I am a retired rooster meister, by default.

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1 hour ago, Quintus Arrius said:

I haven't the foggiest -- I only collect them, or did. On my desk, in my hand-printing, is a table with years, Mint state conditions, and the census figures of TPGS, updated monthly. I have been unable to upgrade due to lack of availability in the top grades. Complicating matters is a great deal of speculation as to how many such coins were melted and when. The vast majority of upper fringe coins do not reside in any Set Registry. I am a retired rooster meister, by default.

Most collectors outside the US do not prefer or necessarily even like TPG.  However, for a not so widely collected series (at meaningful premiums above melt), the counts even for the 1899 and 1900 aren't that low.  This is my inference why you have had difficulty upgrading your set because most of the better coin potentially aren't in a TPG holder.

The 1923 SA sovereign has a combined count of 21 out of a reported mintage of either 64 or 406.  (The first is the generally accepted mintage today but I believe wrong.)  However, most or maybe all of these cost over 5 digits.  Don't know how scarce the 1916C is but it's reasonably so, as is the 1924 SA.

Here are examples of coins I would include in this list, some or all of which I presume are actually in it:

  • 1911 Canada pattern dollar (one of two and known the "King of Canadian" coinage);
  • 1921 Canadian 50c
  • 1936 "with Dot" Canadian cent
  • 1920S (Australia) sovereign
  • 1930 Australia penny
  • 1935 New Zealand Waitangi Crown (somewhat scarce though not rare but high preference)
  • 1933 UK penny
  • 1902 South Africa ZAR veldpond (It's moderately scarce but unique design and interesting background.  It's a 5 digit coin except mishandled)
  • Maybe the 1931 South Africa Union 3P
Edited by World Colonial
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1 hour ago, Zebo said:

I wouldnt mind learning about your collection as well. I am sure it would be interesting - especially with the trials and tribulations that you have to overcome finding some of the issues.

i know very little of the series.

Are you referring to when I used to buy South Africa?

I still have maybe 100 coins in a TPG holder. most of which I wish I had sold.  However, I sold the bulk of my best coinage almost a decade ago, haven't bought much since and don't buy it at all any more.

The reason?  First, I was spread too thin and don't have the budget to focus on the number of series I used to buy.  Second, the marketability of South African coinage is generally terrible outside of South Africa.  Most of the supply of better coinage probably has returned "home" and there isn't much to buy except from there.  The price level has crashed but the scarcer dates in higher quality are also still more expensive than what I buy now.

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14 minutes ago, World Colonial said:

Are you referring to when I used to buy South Africa?

I still have maybe 100 coins in a TPG holder. most of which I wish I had sold.  However, I sold the bulk of my best coinage almost a decade ago, haven't bought much since and don't buy it at all any more.

The reason?  First, I was spread too thin and don't have the budget to focus on the number of series I used to buy.  Second, the marketability of South African coinage is generally terrible outside of South Africa.  Most of the supply of better coinage probably has returned "home" and there isn't much to buy except from there.  The price level has crashed but the scarcer dates in higher quality are also still more expensive than what I buy now.

South Africa would be interesting, but I thought you also collect Pillars. 

I have a decent collection of South Africian sovereigns, but it is just a subset. There are only 10 coins in the series as you know.

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37 minutes ago, World Colonial said:

Most collectors outside the US do not prefer or necessarily even like TPG.  However, for a not so widely collected series (at meaningful premiums above melt), the counts even for the 1899 and 1900 aren't that low.  This is my inference why you have had difficulty upgrading your set because most of the better coin potentially aren't in a TPG holder.

The 1923 SA sovereign has a combined count of 21 out of a reported mintage of either 64 or 406.  (The first is the generally accepted mintage today but I believe wrong.)  However, most or maybe all of these cost over 5 digits.  Don't know how scarce the 1916C is but it's reasonably so, as is the 1924 SA.

Here are examples of coins I would include in this list, some or all of which I presume are actually in it:

  • 1911 Canada pattern dollar (one of two and known the "King of Canadian" coinage);
  • 1921 Canadian 50c
  • 1936 "with Dot" Canadian cent
  • 1920S (Australia) sovereign
  • 1930 Australia penny
  • 1935 New Zealand Waitangi Crown (somewhat scarce though not rare but high preference)
  • 1933 UK penny
  • 1902 South Africa ZAR veldpond (It's moderately scarce but unique design and interesting background.  It's a 5 digit coin except mishandled)
  • Maybe the 1931 South Africa Union 3P

Some good picks. I think here will be a few sovereigns lumped together and discussed as a set (maybe not). 

1953 proof QEII

1920 S as you mentioned (interesting story & very low mintage)

1923 SA as you also mentioned (opening of the South African Mint & low mintage)

possibley the 1917 - entire issue was to pay for war reparations and the vast majority melted

possibly the 1908 C (Edward VII - opening the Canadian mint & low mintage)

I would not include the 1918 I (Bombay Mint) and I keep want to throw in some from the 1800s - to bad they didn't go farther back to the beginning of the Modern sovereign (1817). 

There may may be more than one British penny as well (add unique 1952 & 1937)

I am interested in the Chiense and Japanise entries as I know little of them.

 

 

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32 minutes ago, Zebo said:

South Africa would be interesting, but I thought you also collect Pillars. 

I have a decent collection of South Africian sovereigns, but it is just a subset. There are only 10 coins in the series as you know.

Yes, pillars are my primary series and essentially all I buy since about 2014, from Bolivia and Peru mostly.  I buy mostly from auctions supplemented by a few from dealers.  I have bought most of the better minors (don't buy many 8R) sold publicly during the time I have tried hardest to buy it, back to around 2010.  Some I chose not to buy due to competing priorities (mostly) and some others sold where I wasn't aware of it at the time.  Others either in the TPG data or in references I have not see offered.  Then there are those in the ANS collection though don't know the full extent of the collection and especially the quality.

It's mostly waiting for these coins to appear for sale, as the coins have appeared as single lots close together sometimes and then not much to anything in between.  This year, only two coins.  Two I missed out on in 2002 and still waiting for it to appear.

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34 minutes ago, Zebo said:

Some good picks. I think here will be a few sovereigns lumped together and discussed as a set (maybe not). 

1953 proof QEII

1920 S as you mentioned (interesting story & very low mintage)

1923 SA as you also mentioned (opening of the South African Mint & low mintage)

possibley the 1917 - entire issue was to pay for war reparations and the vast majority melted

possibly the 1908 C (Edward VII - opening the Canadian mint & low mintage)

I would not include the 1918 I (Bombay Mint) and I keep want to throw in some from the 1800s - to bad they didn't go farther back to the beginning of the Modern sovereign (1817). 

There may may be more than one British penny as well (add unique 1952 & 1937)

I am interested in the Chiense and Japanise entries as I know little of them.

 

 

I can see some sets included as one entry, but probably only proofs and patterns.  The Edward VIII set would be one.

I highly doubt there will be this many sovereigns.  One you may not know is a 1950 South Africa proof pattern.  It's listed in the local catalogs but not Krause.  I doubt most sovereign collectors have ever heard of it.  There are so many Union patterns (99%+ never available for sale) that most South African collectors don't seem to know it either.  It's buried in the catalog but I would think would be highly sought after if ever offered for sale.  You may also remember the KGV patterns.  Heritage sold an off metal strike (bronze I believe) around 10 years ago and a few more were offered by DNW as part of the Bentley collection.

The summary you provided mentioned Chinese, Korea and Japan.  I don't know much about this coinage either though I know some of it is rare and quite expensive, especially now from China.  The list might also include one or more of the very low mintage modern Chinese gold NCLT but I don't consider these real coins.  The "coins" are abnormally large and more closely resemble tableware.  Just another gimmick as far as I am concerned.

This is going to sound harsh but the biggest problem with this list is that without the apparently large number of patterns, there aren't actually 100 "great" coins from this period without exaggerating the importance.  It's not nearly as bad as the US top 100 moderns used as a PCGS registry set (totally contrived) but if these noncollectible coins represent an outsized percentage, it's a good indication the authors know they couldn't put together a substantive list without it.

 

Edited by World Colonial
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10 hours ago, Quintus Arrius said:

 I have been unable to upgrade due to lack of availability in the top grades. [snip] The vast majority of upper fringe coins do not reside in any Set Registry. I am a retired rooster meister, by default.

You aren't kidding. These things are hard to find in nice shape.

Of course, I only averaged 2 coins/year on my last set so I'm on schedule for 2036 :whee:

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9 hours ago, World Colonial said:

I can see some sets included as one entry, but probably only proofs and patterns.  The Edward VIII set would be one.

I highly doubt there will be this many sovereigns.  One you may not know is a 1950 South Africa proof pattern.  It's listed in the local catalogs but not Krause.  I doubt most sovereign collectors have ever heard of it.  There are so many Union patterns (99%+ never available for sale) that most South African collectors don't seem to know it either.  It's buried in the catalog but I would think would be highly sought after if ever offered for sale.  You may also remember the KGV patterns.  Heritage sold an off metal strike (bronze I believe) around 10 years ago and a few more were offered by DNW as part of the Bentley collection.

The summary you provided mentioned Chinese, Korea and Japan.  I don't know much about this coinage either though I know some of it is rare and quite expensive, especially now from China.  The list might also include one or more of the very low mintage modern Chinese gold NCLT but I don't consider these real coins.  The "coins" are abnormally large and more closely resemble tableware.  Just another gimmick as far as I am concerned.

This is going to sound harsh but the biggest problem with this list is that without the apparently large number of patterns, there aren't actually 100 "great" coins from this period without exaggerating the importance.  It's not nearly as bad as the US top 100 moderns used as a PCGS registry set (totally contrived) but if these noncollectible coins represent an outsized percentage, it's a good indication the authors know they couldn't put together a substantive list without it.

 

My hope is that they lump a number of sovereigns together and count them as one. That way they can briefly discuss several, but not overload the list. Maybe have the 1953 proof stand by itself, and then discuss the others as one. Don't know - my copy of the book has just shipped. 

I vaguely remember something about a South Africian 1950 pattern, but will have to search my notes to refresh my memory.

The Chiense and Japanise coins should,be interesting. I'm looking forward to seeing some. 

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