It's Token Tuesday! Post 'em if you got 'em.
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184 posts in this topic

1 hour ago, EdG_Ohio said:

The color gives the appearance of nickle...is that what it is ? ...or even a "polished" aluminum. hm

The guide book lists it as aluminum. I agree it’s almost too clean. But it looks great In my newly started Alabama token album 

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48 minutes ago, Woods020 said:

The guide book lists it as aluminum. I agree it’s almost too clean. But it looks great In my newly started Alabama token album 

What does the guide book say were the years of circulation for this coin? If there are signs of wear, I don't see any. This is one of the more interesting [generic] tokens I have seen.  If you have to ask, Which 'coffee shop?, you're obviously not from the area.  Never seen anything like it. Nice find.

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34 minutes ago, Quintus Arrius said:

What does the guide book say were the years of circulation for this coin? If there are signs of wear, I don't see any. This is one of the more interesting [generic] tokens I have seen.  If you have to ask, Which 'coffee shop?, you're obviously not from the area.  Never seen anything like it. Nice find.

Darned if I know. I did some searching and couldn’t pin it down. The guidebook for Alabama tokens is a very primitive resource with little information.
 

As I’ve started getting into tokens that’s been the biggest learning experience. Its nearly impossible to find much information on a lot of the historic businesses that utilized tokens. 

 

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13 hours ago, EdG_Ohio said:

My old eyes can't read the ---script between the 1 and system...hurts my whittle brain :grin:

It's either Trade, Jingle, Girdle or Giraffe -- none of which make sense.

13 hours ago, EdG_Ohio said:

 

 

Edited by Quintus Arrius
Duplication
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12 minutes ago, Quintus Arrius said:

It's either Trade, Jingle, Girdle or Giraffe -- none of which make sense.

 

The symbol just below the 1 that goes through the -script looks like a old school compass we used in geometry class.

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15 hours ago, EdG_Ohio said:

My old eyes can't read the --script between the 1 and system...hurts my whittle brain :grin:

It says Ingle. As I understand it Ingle systems was a leading manufacturer of these tokens. 

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1 hour ago, Woods020 said:

It says Ingle. As I understand it Ingle systems was a leading manufacturer of these tokens. 

Now that we have established that, why the double-loop in the l ?  Oh, I get it.  The engraver made a mistake but the manufacturer did not wish to embarrass him by emphasizing it, right?  

I love Token Tuesdays!

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14 hours ago, Just Bob said:

Back on page 4 of this thread, I posted a token by pharmacists Bearden & La Grone, and mentioned that there was another style token that was issued. I was watching one of those on Ebay at the time, but it was not in the best of condition, so I decided to pass. Shortly after that, another one showed up, and it was in a bit better condition, so I put in a bid and won.

 

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One font used on one side; another used on the other. An absolutely gorgeous #5 and an ampersand written the way it was when it used to be the 27th letter of the alphabet. Great stuff, Just Bob!

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1 hour ago, Fenntucky Mike said:

1893 Columbian Exposition,

Forgot I had tokens from this. :preach: Not my prime token interest but I like it.

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CHAMPION LOAD OF LOGS WEIGHT: 144 TONS and only two horses?

 

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10 hours ago, Quintus Arrius said:

CHAMPION LOAD OF LOGS WEIGHT: 144 TONS and only two horses?

Tis true, 144 tons or just over 36,000 board feet (12' x 12' x 1').

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Dang, forgot I had this picture. I need to go through my stuff and rediscover some things.

Found a few more pics online. 

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Edited by Fenntucky Mike
Grammar
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4 hours ago, Fenntucky Mike said:

Tis true, 144 tons or just over 36,000 board feet (12' x 12' x 1').

1406140337_ChampionLoadofLogs(1)-Copy.jpg.f15fac29b1608f6c53b0c3bab388956f.jpg

Dang, forgot I had this picture. I need to go through my stuff and rediscover some things.

Found a few more pics online. 

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download.png.92b49bcbd5726134018d9a1bbe682592.png

 

Couldn't help myself....

 

Log.Horses.jpg

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William Head, Sr opened his drug store in 1902, and ran it until 1940. His son, Will, Jr., who had joined him in 1920, continued running the store until he closed it in 1976, at the age of 80. These tokens were used in the very early years of the 20th century. There were two styles, both for a 5 cent glass of soda water.

 

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In addition to being a partner in a real estate firm, B.F. Lampton owned a general store in Darbun, MS from 1916 to 1940.

Although Chatham only lists a $1.00 and $.05 token, denominations of $.10 and $.25 are also known. I own examples of all but the $1. Here is the $.25 piece.

 

 

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@Just Bob Interesting, didn't realize there were "coupon" books for such things and I wonder what 500lbs of ice costed back in the day.
Reminds me of my ration cards in the military overseas.
...and perhaps the 1st combination of "Fire and Ice" I've seen in print (coal/ice)....haha

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The previous post was about Lorenzo Batson, who was the brother of this week's subject: Randolph Batson. 

In 1883, the two brothers built a store in Hillsdale, Mississippi, to serve the workers who were building the new roadbed for the Southern Railway. As they prospered, they began buying tracts of virgin timber. In 1893, the partnership was dissolved, and L.B moved to Millard (see previous post.) Randolph remained in Hillsdale and continued to purchase timberland, eventually owning 100,000 acres in Mississippi, and another 20,000 in Florida. In 1910, he established the Southern Lumber and Timber Company in Hillsdale, a token of which is shown in the very first post in this thread. That mill burned in 1922. In 1924, he joined with N.P. and W.H Hatten to purchase the sawmill of  the Ingram-Day Lumber Company, and with it, the sawmill town of Lyman, MS. At full capacity, the Batson & Hatten mill produced 200,000 board feet of yellow pine lumber per day, and employed 500 hands. (The town of Lyman still exists today. It is located just north of Gulfport, on Highway 49.)

"Ran" Batson was an influential figure in southern Mississippi, and was instrumental in replanting the forests after all of the virgin timber had been cut. At the time of his death, he owned 14,000 acres which had been replanted in pines, and stocked with deer and other wildlife, along with other pieces of property throughout south Mississippi.

The octagonal lumber company tokens are known in denominations of $.05, $.25, and $1; The round mercantile tokens are known in these denominations, plus a one cent token. No ten cent tokens are known for either.

 

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