It's Token Tuesday! Post 'em if you got 'em.
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Re the "loom," I marvel at the ancient mounting marks left by a prehistoric slab at roughly 10, 2, 4 and 8 o' clock.  I am kidding, of course!  Unique piece. I have never seen anything like it. Nice catch, and thanks for sharing it!

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Although Gattman, Mississippi began as a trading post for whites conducting business with the Chickasaw Indians, it grew into a bustling town, with eight stores, a brick kiln, three blacksmiths, a cotton gin, and numerous grist and lumber mills. It also had a large hotel, a drug store, and four doctors. R.L Markham owned a store in Gattman which sold, among other things, surreys and buggies.

This token is not listed in the Chatham token book, but $.10, $.25, $.50, and $1.00 tokens are known to exist. The stock 1914 Ingle Systems reverse is used on all of them. I own examples of all but the dollar token.

 

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Mrs.Thomas (Elsie) Joseph ran a grocery store on McRaven Street in Vicksburg from 1914-1927. Tokens were issued in denominations of 25 cents and 5 cents.The reverse is the 1909 Ingle Systems stock reverse, found on many tokens.

This is another one of those "take what comes available" tokens. The reverse is scratched badly, but the token is listed as Unique, so when this one became available, I figured it might be my only chance to own an example.

 

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It being Tuesday, September 8, 2020...

Old-time numismatists may recall a column in the Sunday editions of "The New York Times," (long-since discontinued) entitled "Pastimes, Coins." 

In the February 18, 1990 edition, there was a brief discussion of prison tokens, one of which featured Thomas Mott Osborne's Mutual Welfare League prison tokens as used at Sing Sing State Prison from 1914 to 1915.

These were earned by inmates on the basis of good conduct, in small denominations, 5 cents, 10 cents, etc., which could then be used in the prison commissary, or store.

Flash forward some 30 years and I finally had a chance to stumble across these two while researching the history of New York City bus and subway tokens.  They are aluminum; all are considered scarce.

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Here is something a bit different. This token is actually made of the material that it is advertising.

The pressed wood fiber product called "Masonite" was patented in 1924 in Laurel, Mississippi by William Mason. It is made from wood fibers that are heated and formed without  the use of adhesives or formaldehyde resins. The company has been bought and sold a few times, but is still in operation in Laurel.

 

 

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7 hours ago, Just Bob said:

Here is something a bit different. This token is actually made of the material that it is advertising.

The pressed wood fiber product called "Masonite" was patented in 1924 in Laurel, Mississippi by William Mason. It is made from wood fibers that are heated and formed without  the use of adhesives or formaldehyde resins. The company has been bought and sold a few times, but is still in operation in Laurel.

 

 

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The Free State of Jones. Never heard that before though I knew Laurel was the county seat.  As Faulkner said, "The past is never dead. It's not even past."  Civil war. Reconstruction.  Nice catch!  And thanks for sharing.

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Another unusual one: a uniface cardboard token from Vicksburg, MS, good for ten cents worth of ice. At that time, 1920, that was probably at least 25 lbs of ice, maybe more. This would likely have been in block form, delivered to your icebox.

 

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Been skipping out the last few weeks, so here is a group.

Atwood - Coffee lists 8 varieties in the sixth edition, here are 6 of them.

These are Timetable Tokens for the Graham & Morton Steamship Line which (in one form or another) operated in the Great Lakes from the end of the 19th Century to the mid 20th. Initially started to transport goods (mainly timber products, along with grains) from Wisconsin and Michigan to Chicago. Once the timber supply dwindled and the demand was reduced due to the increased use of steel in construction, more fresh produce was transported mainly fruits (apples, peaches) in the fall. With the construction of railroads the need for transportation of goods was drastically reduced, now enter the vacationing public, to replace the loss of freight, vacation resorts were established in towns up and down the shores of Lake Michigan, the most popular destinations were on the West Michigan shoreline. Vacation excursions were popular, especially during the peak season of the fruit harvest (still are today). With the increased popularity of the automobile as a mode of transportation and an improved highway system (note the tagline "Dustless Way To Happy Land" in the brochure, this was a reference to the roads.) the popularity of the Steamship slowly faded away, until in 1951 (I think) when the Graham & Morton Line set off on their final "commodious" voyage to "Happy Land".

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W.P. Brown was reported at one time to have had 20 plantations, with more land under cultivation than any other individual in the US. This token was used in the farm store located in Drew, MS, from 1919-1940. It is listed as an R8 (4-5 known). I have a 5 cent token (R7), also. There were also tokens issued in denominations of 25 cents and one dollar.

 

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Herman W. (Casey) Jones owned a dry goods store in Mendenhall, MS, from 1947 to 1970. These tokens were used as change.

 

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48 minutes ago, Just Bob said:

Herman W. (Casey) Jones owned a dry goods store in Mendenhall, MS, from 1947 to 1970. These tokens were used as change.

 

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Great pieces!  I never did go south of Jackson where Mendenhall is but did manage to catch a ride with a local in an old Ford pick-up from the 1940's who took me north to Vaughan near where Casey Jones the legendary locomotive engineer met his demise in 1900 or so. You've got quite a collection of really interesting tokens.  Thanks for sharing!

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7 hours ago, Crruisercharlie said:

1844 Bank of Montreal 1/2 penny token

Never seen one of these before; never even knew they existed.  That's what happens when you're raised on Red Books.  Great find; very well preserved, too!

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2 hours ago, ldhair said:

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The Constitution?  I love everything about it: the old-time copper, the 28? astericks, the superb "dental" work (no missing or damaged teeth) the wind-blown sails (all the names of which I once knew from my childhood visits to the old salts and the sailing ships at the South Street seaport and last, but not least, those hefty fonts you just don't find on new coins anymore. Good year and a great piece! [Aside: a ref:  LONGITUDE: The True Story of a Lone Genius Who Solved the Greatest Scientific Problem of His Time. By Dava Sobel (1995) Briefly, the seafaring tragedy that prompted an inquiry into determining one's nautical position while crossing the North Atlantic in the era before GPS.]

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It's Tuesday on the east coast, US, even if it's still Monday here. :)

The Rockport Hotel was built in 1901 by AV Pressentin, for the terminus of the new railroad, running upriver along the Skagit river, from the small town of Sedro Woolley, Washington. Later on a tavern was added. (Probably where this is from.)

The hotel burned to the ground in 1952.

 

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On 9/30/2020 at 6:48 AM, ldhair said:

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Not my area, but is this considered a Hard Times Token? Most I recall seeing had earlier dates than this.

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1 hour ago, VKurtB said:

Not my area, but is this considered a Hard Times Token? Most I recall seeing had earlier dates than this.

HTTs go through 1843.

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The Columbus Ice Cream shop was in operation from 1918 to 1940.

 

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I am going to shift gears, and post something completely different from my normal posts.

We went to the Flight 93 Memorial in Pennsylvania yesterday, and I must say, it was a moving experience. I don't normally agree with or support commercializing tragedies, but the proceeds from the items in the gift shop there are supposed to go toward maintaining the site, so I bought this token.

If you are ever in the area, I recommend going to see this place. It is worth the trip.

 

 

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