It's Token Tuesday! Post 'em if you got 'em.
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J.B. Newton operated a turpentine plant from 1914 to 1928. Tokens were issued in denominations of 5, 10 and 25 cents.

On a side note: The area around Poplarville once contained thousands of acres of Tung trees, grown for the oil that was extracted from the  nut. The oil is used as a wood finish and preservative. Hurricanes in the 1960s, like Beulah and Camille, wiped out the industry. An attempt was made in the early 2000s to reestablish a plantation, but the trees were destroyed by Hurricane Katrina. Tung trees have become naturalized, and now grow wild all over the southern part of the state.

 

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Was headed to the Tulip festival last year, plus some other places in the vicinity, but on the way the wife had this genius idea of stopping in a casino 'real quick like'. Six hours later, never made it to the area, out of time and barely enough gas to make it back to her parents house where we were staying east of Lansing. (thank g for tailwinds). Just another Fine mess she got me into. Going for sure next year. I don't guess 25 cents would buy a look at a tulip nowadays. Cool tokens, a lot of good things happened that year. (including me)   <''>

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O'neal Tatum established Tatum Lumber in 1893, near Hattiesburg, MS. In 1915, W.S.F. Tatum took over, and formed the town of Bonhomie. The mill officially shut down operations in 1940.

The Tatum family also owned the local gas company in Hattiesburg, as well as other businesses and much property.  W.S.F. was also a two-term mayor of the city

 

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Edited by Just Bob
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Although none of these tokens is rare, it took me about a year to accumulate all of the different varieties.

The distinctive reverse of some of the brass tokens - "IN MDSE" on a banner overlaying the denomination - is recognizable as a product of Meyer & Wenthe, a token and badge manufacturer in Chicago. I have not been able to determine if they made all of the other styles, but the fact that the obverses are the same on the brass examples, plus the use of the "IN MDSE" wording on one style of the plastic tokens, makes me think that they were all made by the same company.

 

 

 

 

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Algoma, established in northeast Mississippi in 1860 as a lumber town, was known for its crosstie industry. In fact, it bills itself as the Crosstie Capital of the World, and  holds an annual Crosstie Festival in October.

W. R. Walker operated a general store from 1914 to 1917. In addition to this $1 token, a 50 cent and 25 cent token are also known. All are rare, with only 2 or 3  of each denomination currently known.

 

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Island Side Plantation was owned by the Jones family from 1908 to 1940. It became one of the former plantations which were part of a 1940 government project in which 10,000 acres were purchased by the government, and divided into parcels for resale. Former tenant farmers could apply for low interest loans to buy small tracts of the land.

Tokens were issued in 5 and 10 cent denominations. (I am still looking for a 10)

 

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Wayland, MI - Boggs Recreation

$0.10 Aluminum, 25mm, 1.39g, diamond, Type 1 reverse "R" merges into "¢"

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$0.10 Aluminum, 25mm, 1.39g, diamond, Type 2 reverse "R" & "¢" narrow gap.

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There is also a Type 3 reverse ("R" & "¢" wide gap) and a Type 2 obverse with a bow tie instead of diamond. Neither of which I have yet, I do know where there is a Type 3 reverse just haven't been able to acquire it yet.:frustrated:

$0.05 Aluminum, 22mm, 1.00g, Diamond

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There is a Type 2 coin with no diamond and the abbreviation "ST." where the diamond was/is. There is also a variety with the address as "28" instead of "128", not sure if it is a die error or if they just moved down the street. Seems to be a die error.

Boggs Recreation has been proving elusive for me in the little research I've done so far, so no historical tie in for these guys yet.

Edited by Fenntucky Mike
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11 hours ago, Fenntucky Mike said:

Wayland, MI - Boggs Recreation

$0.10 Aluminum, 25mm, 1.39g, diamond, Type 1 reverse "R" merges into "¢"

 

$0.10 Aluminum, 25mm, 1.39g, diamond, Type 2 reverse "R" & "¢" narrow gap.

 

There is also a Type 3 reverse ("R" & "¢" wide gap) and a Type 2 obverse with a bow tie instead of diamond. Neither of which I have yet, I do know where there is a Type 3 reverse just haven't been able to acquire it yet.:frustrated:

$0.05 Aluminum, 22mm, 1.00g, Diamond

 

There is a Type 2 coin with no diamond and the abbreviation "ST." where the diamond was/is. There is also a variety with the address as "28" instead of "128", not sure if it is a die error or if they just moved down the street. Seems to be a die error.

Boggs Recreation has been proving elusive for me in the little research I've done so far, so no historical tie in for these guys yet.

Finding varieties is one of the fun ways to collect tokens, as it is with coins. The problem with the ones that I collect is that, unless the wording or placement of the words is different, the Mississippi token book only gives a description like "2 varieties known." With no description of the difference, it is up to me to look at all examples to see it I can find out what the difference is. Still, that makes things more interesting.

Nice tokens :)

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Clarence Hossley operated a billiard room inside the Carroll Hotel in Vicksburg 1911-1912. There were two types of 5 cent tokens issued: one with a center hole, and one without. Both were brass, and both are rare. I have an example of the holed variety:

 

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Edited by Just Bob
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Charles Box owned a general store and cotton gin in Midnight, MS, from 1909 until his death in 1931. His estate continued to run the store and gin until 1940.

According to tradition, the town site was won in a poker game at the stroke of midnight, which is how it got its name.

This denomination is not listed in the MS token book. It, and the $1, and $.50 tokens that are listed are all blank on the reverse

 

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Encompassing 17,000 acres, King and Anderson plantation was said to be the largest family owned plantation in Mississippi.

The tokens were used at the company store, which is the first building pictured.

There are two varieties of both the one dollar and the fifty cent tokens. (Sorry about switching the position of obverse/reverse on one of the pictures) Both the obverse and reverse are different on the two $1.00 tokens, but only the obverse is different on the $.50 (note the die chip on the left of the "0" on both reverses.)

The set contains a one cent token, which is not common,since they usually cost more than one cent apiece to purchase

There was also a $3.50 punch card issued, but I have only seen pictures of one.

 

 

 

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Edited by Just Bob
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PIpes and Page was a general store, operating from 1899-1902, on Davis Bend, a Mississippi River peninsula owned by the family of Jefferson Davis.

The maker's mark on the reverse is from Excelsior Stencil Works in St Louis, the manufacturer of the token.

This token just spent the last year and a half soaking in olive oil to remove gunk. I did not pick, scrub, or brush it after I removed it. All I did was rinse and dry it.The overall color lightened a bit over time, and the dark stains are most likely permanent, since I don't plan to do anything else to it.

It is listed as an R10 (unique), and I don't think this is the one referred to in the book, so there probably are at least two in existence.

 

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Olive oil is one of the acceptable methods of removing gunk from coins, along with acetone and water. It had nothing to do with the name of the token manufacturer, although it is a happy coincidence, I must say :)

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