Steel cent errors and help please
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8 posts in this topic

Hello, new to the forum and still learning... I am just curious about steel penny errors,  are they relatively common?  I have a few of them that look a little off, but ill just start with one for now . Not sure if it would be a double die error or something else... The 4 looks doubled the 3 is ...ahh   bent and double...?  the S ?     Anyway,  somewhat new to collecting and very new to error coins... Thanks for any info.

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Welcome to the forum.

To answer your first question: Errors on steel cents are not that common, as far as I can tell, but striking anomalies are, which is what your coin has. As far as the coins themselves, steel cents are numerous from all three mints, which in my opinion, helps to make them one of the really fun collectible coins. They were saved in large numbers, so are inexpensive in all but the highest grades, and available from many sources. The main issue to look out for is aftermarket re-plating. Many corroded or rusted "steelies" were stripped of their original zinc outer layer and re-plated, in order to make them look more appealing to potential buyers. Since the planchets (coin blanks) were punched from a strip to which the zinc plating had already been applied, the edges of the coins did not receive any plating, and an original coin should show a seam. If you find a steel cent with a smooth edge, it has likely been re-plated.

About your coin:

Greenstang is right about the "3" in the date taking a hit, and this quote by author and NGC Research Director David Lange speaks to the doubling of the date and mint mark:

" That coin has a form of doubling commonly seen on 1943 cents that resulted from the erosive effects of the plated planchets. A line from the duplicate ... image toward the primary one points directly at the center of the coin, confirming that it is simply a result of die erosion. This is commonly seen on both the date and mintmark, always in the same direction away from the center. "

 

And, just for the sake of clarity, Doubled dies and Re-punched mint marks, are considered "Varieties," and not "errors." At least by some folks.

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Thank You, I appreciate all the information, I still have a lot to learn... and I'll work on the proper terminology :bigsmile:  One more question if anybody has the time..?.. Is this just erosion and or corrosion from its environment ? I have a few with some rust or pitting but this one just stands out ...124870541_DSC01172(2).thumb.JPG.71195e03d45a2c3e14b862d5554f60df.JPG221454019_DSC01174(2).thumb.JPG.1ef1293018d4d60df0920e40ba2b02e7.JPG

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Yes, that is corrosion. Remember, it is only an error if it happens during the striking of the coin. Anything else is just damage.

Please start a new post for each coin. It causes confusion when there is more than one coin on a post.

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10 hours ago, Broseph said:

 I still have a lot to learn... and I'll work on the proper terminology :bigsmile:  ..

Don't sweat it too much. There are members of this forum, and others who use the terms interchangeably, including current and former dealers,  graders, and others who are employed in the coin industry. Even the Third Party Grading Companies have called varieties "errors" on their slabs. No one is going to ostracize you for doing it. :wink:

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12 hours ago, Greenstang said:

Yes, that is corrosion. Remember, it is only an error if it happens during the striking of the coin. Anything else is just damage.

Please start a new post for each coin. It causes confusion when there is more than one coin on a post.

On the obverse, I see some things that don't look like corrosion to me, in particular the bottom half of the coin:

  • the "E" in "LIBERTY" sure looks like it's been struck on top of that difference in elevation, the bottom left corner of the letter deflects down and into the recessed area
  • there appears to be a cud or some other raised metal at 6 o'clock
  • Lincoln's left lapel line runs through what looks like a raised area without a break or interruption

The reverse is...well, it's a reverse.

Broseph, you have the coin in hand, I don't, and Greenstang is a lot more experienced than I am. However -- look at that obverse very carefully. If the strike is on top of the two raised areas in LIBERTY and at the lapel line, and the lines in the strike are across the raised areas, then it may be some sort of lamination error and worth a second look from an expert in such things.

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