1980 large and small date
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Hello to all and my your day 've peaceful.Well here is two 1980'both are different,the 0 is bigger and the 8 is bigger.So now we know that .Well then you should know that the coin is just a bit smaller.Well I'm waiting to hear from all you.So thanks for viewing and replying.oh one thing.his shoulders are wider

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There are no recognized date size varieties for 1980. That said, the 1980-D with all the red in it might be an album candidate.

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4 minutes ago, R420coins said:

So you can be nice when you want to'? Gm :) so since one was never added ,why not start now ? Since you can see the difference lol

Actually, no, not so much. But then I don't see what others see quite a bit.

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Hey come on smile,you are alive so wake up lol.sometimes people hate to get old! Yet! I say I hate to forget anything because I'm getting older lmao ;)

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2 minutes ago, R420coins said:

Hey come on smile,you are alive so wake up lol.sometimes people hate to get old! Yet! I say I hate to forget anything because I'm getting older lmao ;)

My motto is: "We're old people; we know stuff."

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1 minute ago, R420coins said:

Yes! Very true .still it's a new world an it's just getting bigger.So with that in mind,how much does one really knows? Lol

That's where we part company, my friend. I  think we vastly overstate that "new world" thing. It's the same, pretty much, as it always has been.

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Oh just one more thing!.if planchets has different colors,which to tell apart from others.then that means that there is a die to match that launcher? Now see these questions are not in a book,AS TO GIVE DETAILS OF HOW MANY COLORS for that year of coins made ? More or so .why is so many colors of dies for the coin mint print?

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We already know that stuff about 4 pieces of creating a coin.then into the press,which by then is being stamped.after polished and inspected then completed.out for public use:).yeah yeah! What about the facts of how the die is still setting,which is where you can say PMD or rotting away.what's going on before it really leave the Mint? I Didn't put this up to be funny or make jokes.like really looking at.that is poor planchet work .this is what makes me seek these coins because sometimes somethings happen before public could have opened that first wrap ?

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1 hour ago, R420coins said:

Oh just one more thing!.if planchets has different colors,which to tell apart from others.then that means that there is a die to match that launcher? Now see these questions are not in a book,AS TO GIVE DETAILS OF HOW MANY COLORS for that year of coins made ? More or so .why is so many colors of dies for the coin mint print?

There are NOT multiple colors of dies - only one - steel gray. Why? Because dies are made of … STEEL. Any color that exists comes from the planchet.

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Gm :) yes ! They do have valuable information,yet! Only when they want to give that information.No matter what! Watch all trust none! Because truth be told,when someone states that we need them to to be recognized? If all the grading companies,supposed to be on the same page.then why are you bad mouthing each other? Or when you know that's not the Right answer to give,then why lie about what's most true ? You say that it's impossible to happen,ok why is it happening? So when you say your grading companies are the best! Well I would say that would in questioning.it shows here daily on this board what's really going on.did you know when you tell someone they seeing things,that you are actually at risking someone's mental health? Oh! Let me guess you are certified? Because if someone good out an try what you told me to do sometimes,well lol you know they might need a straight jacket.lmao.So I hope you have good insurance for that,because maybe you may find yourself in court.rather than you finding a coin lol .So as you was saying? So what you are telling me now is ,that all these are correct dies? Because my next question is how do you identify from any other coins that was created from the Mint?

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To assist with precision of language:

Planchet - the metal planchet has a rounded shape and raised rim. This is what becomes the coin before it is minted.

https://www.coinnews.net/2007/07/02/what-are-coin-planchets-are-they-worth-anything/

Coin Die - A coin die is a formed piece of metal engraved with the negative of either the obverse (heads) or reverse (tails) side of a coin’s design. These front and back dies are forced together in a coining press, like a hammer is to an anvil, and impart their designs onto a blank to form a coin.

http://www.coinnews.net/2013/04/09/u-s-mint-at-san-francisco-preparing-coin-dies/

So the Die never changes color or leaves the Mint. Once it's damaged or out of date it's retired. 

Your latest picture shows multiple 1964 Lincoln Cents.  All in different stages of Brown to Red-Brown to Red.  They all started as planchets of the same color.  After minting and entering circulation, Lincoln Cents, and other coins, react with the environment around them.  Due to the copper content on the outside of the small cents (Lincoln, Indian Head, Flying Eagle, etc..) they are susceptible to tarnishing (oxidation).  Just as any copper in the world is.

Now let's step back to that spot about a die becoming damaged.  The Mint goes through many dies during the course of producing 1 year's worth of coinage.  [I don't have an example of numbers used but I think I saw Conder mention it before so maybe somebody else will chime in with a reference.]  For the purpose of an example let's say 500 dies are used and each die is responsible for creating 10,000 individual coins.  A percentage of the first coins pressed off that die will generally be the highest quality (presuming no planchet flaws and no mistakes in the mechanical process) - this is where prooflike business strikes originate and the ultra cameo proofs of the earlier years.  If a die has an error, i.e., doubled devices, repunched mint marks, polished away devices, etc..., before it enters production then it could potentially create 10,000 individual coins with that same error in our scenario.  This is now called a variety (again, precision of language).  Once that die has completed its usefulness, though, it's retired and those 10,000 [out of the 5 million in our scenario] are the only coins with that particular variety.  That's why you'll often hear people say "no known varieties" for certain coins/years/mint marks.  Are new ones still discovered on old coins?  Very rarely.

Because the entire process is mechanical that tends to be the easiest failure point.  A die becomes static and has a set lifespan (unless retired early due to damage).  The planchets have their own set of QA prior to entering the minting workflow.  But if you're striking 100 coins a minute in an automated machine with screws, rivets, lubricant (grease), etc... mistakes will happen even with proper maintenance.  This is where you will see the mechanical errors such as "struck through", "broadstruck", "struck on wrong planchet", "off center strike", etc....  These are generally one-off occurrences resulting in a unique coin each time, thus, not a variety but a mint error.

.......

Anyhow, I've only really been into numismatics for roughly 3 years now and there's a lot of ground to cover.  There's a lot of information out there readily available.  CDN offers a free newsletter with way more articles than I actually have time to read.  The ANA's magazine The Numismatist is well done and provides articles that link history to the coins so you have a better understanding.  Then there's websites galore about all topics of numismatics. 

You can choose to learn all the "boring" details about minting or you can choose to just leave that up to others and collect coins you like the look of.  But if you choose not to dig into those "boring" details you have to learn to accept the opinions of those that have.  <--that last bit basically applies to any subject matter universally

love ya, bye, time to get back to work:grin:

Edited by CRAWTOMATIC
grammar

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Just now, R420coins said:

Well I hope your day is treating you good:) because I feel better:)

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Even better if I got this right lol;)

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1 minute ago, R420coins said:

1565358204710-914376251.thumb.jpg.8a8e76183d4635b49774576b5134d72d.jpg 1565358346022-1350661165.thumb.jpg.9de803d03f1fd181e7781a9e137b1180.jpg once again we have 1972 double die .both side obverse and reverse.As well as date and mint mark.Yes boring!

 

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