indian edge error 5 rupees coin
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this coin has half of its edge as plain and other half as security edge,

what is the value of this error coin

WIN_20190706_075834.JPG

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Looks like it was struck partially out of collar.

Before anyone can give you a value, could you post photos of both sides. You don't even state what year it is so it is hard to say.

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I doubt very much, but I'm not very familiar with modern Indian coins.

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How popular is coin collecting in India? I ask because demand is a primary driver of value. What percentage of Indians collect coins, do you think? And of that percentage, how many do you think collect modern ones? I ask because, while I do collect US coins as well as world coins, I basically dismiss anything after 1950. From anywhere. However, as a look at the newbie forum will attest, there Americans checking their change and often very excited to think that they have found valuable errors. Now and then, it's even true. So if the same is true in India, then there is more demand, and that should affect value of minor mint mistake coins.

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what about 90 degree anti clockwise rotation of 5 rupees 2001 coin

The problem with error coins is trying to find someone who collects them and those who do mainly want the spectacular errors. Some people do collect minor errors but don't expect much of a premium for them. As far as your 2001 5 rupee goes, collectors of rotated dies want them to be a 180 degree rotation before they have any great value. You may be able to sell your error coins but don't expect a huge markup for them.

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I would think the security edge would have to be applied as a separate step,  and the coin/blank was misaligned at that stage, not during the striking in the collar.

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On 7/8/2019 at 11:21 PM, Greenstang said:

The problem with error coins is trying to find someone who collects them and those who do mainly want the spectacular errors. Some people do collect minor errors but don't expect much of a premium for them. As far as your 2001 5 rupee goes, collectors of rotated dies want them to be a 180 degree rotation before they have any great value. You may be able to sell your error coins but don't expect a huge markup for them.

would any one buy it for 30 dollars ?

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1 hour ago, qwertyu1 said:

would any one buy it for 30 dollars ?

I doubt it, but there's an easy way to find out. List it on Ebay, ten-day auction, with a starting bid of US$30 or your local equivalent. If a bunch of bids come in, someone would buy it for $30. If no one bids, one might start to doubt that anyone would pay $30 for it.

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