1959-D penny.
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Interesting read, I'm sure that the TPG's are taking the cautious approach due to the value associated to this coin.  Of note the article suggests that perhaps as many as 2000 were coined yet only this one example has surfaced.

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Why can't they slab it with the letter of authenticity from the treasury?

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8 hours ago, Coinbuf said:

Interesting read, I'm sure that the TPG's are taking the cautious approach due to the value associated to this coin.  Of note the article suggests that perhaps as many as 2000 were coined yet only this one example has surfaced.

Actually, it said that as many as 2000 obverse dies could have been used that year.

From the article:

"The Goldbergs write, “It is very unlikely that new dies were used just to coin this one specimen, and the dies were very likely normal production dies which happened to be available when the new reverse was being adapted by the mints,” providing a calculation that perhaps as many as 2,000 Lincoln cent obverse dies were used in Denver in 1959."

 

Edited by Just Bob
Added quote

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18 hours ago, MAULEMALL said:

Why can't they slab it with the letter of authenticity from the treasury

Because if they do and it later turns out to be a fake, who's liable the TPG or the Treasury?  The Treasury isn't going to reimburse a buyer.  And the TPG that wasn't sure it was real but slabbed it on the strength of the Treasuy's authentication isn't going to want to pay off either.

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22 hours ago, Conder101 said:

Because if they do and it later turns out to be a fake, who's liable the TPG or the Treasury?  The Treasury isn't going to reimburse a buyer.  And the TPG that wasn't sure it was real but slabbed it on the strength of the Treasuy's authentication isn't going to want to pay off either.

The Treasury has been wrong before as well.  Though I hate to bring up a coin which has caused some problems on here as of late, The Treasury initially declared the 1969-S DDO Lincoln Cents as counterfeits and destroyed several examples before figuring out that they were genuine.  I think that Conder has the answer just right here.....no TPG wants to be on the hook for this one.

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