1758/7 British sixpence stunning ūüĎÄ
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9 posts in this topic

I don't see how they give you less than EF for that. I see nothing that's like damage or rim dings. Very hmmm detail on both sides. Truth be told I think it's valid at least to consider the possibility that the flatness on the monarch's earlocks (I never knew he was Jewish, and it's tough to see the yarmulke; shows you how deficient my education is in British history) has to do with strike weakness.

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I vote EF if that is wear, and AU if it is strike issues.

Two questions:

1. Was there anything akin to luster, as we know it today, on these coins when they were struck?

2. What is the significance of the harp?

(I realize that I could research both of those myself, but sometimes it is more interesting to hear what others know.)

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10 hours ago, Just Bob said:

2. What is the significance of the harp?

The four shields represent the parts of the royal coat of arms.  The shield at the top is England and Scotland (viewers left and right respectively).  The shield at 3:00 the claims on France or later their French possessions such as Normandy (which the English lost in 1204, but it was still on the arms).  The shield at 6:00 is Ireland, and the shield at 9:00 is the coat of arms of the House of Hannover.  When George I became King of England he was also the King of Hannover in Germany.  George II, who issued this coin, was also King of Hannover.  They retained that kingdom until Victoria came to the throne in 1837.  Under Hannover law a woman could not sit on the throne so the throne went to her uncle the Duke of Cumberland.

Edited by Conder101
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14 hours ago, Conder101 said:

The four shields represent the parts of the royal coat of arms.  The shield at the top is England and Scotland (viewers left and right respectively).  The shield at 3:00 the claims on France or later their French possessions such as Normandy (which the English lost in 1204, but it was still on the arms).  The shield at 6:00 is Ireland, and the shield at 9:00 is the coat of arms of the House of Hannover.  When George I became King of England he was also the King of Hannover in Germany.  George II, who issued this coin, was also King of Hannover.  They retained that kingdom until Victoria came to the throne in 1837.  Under Hannover law a woman could not sit on the throne so the throne went to her uncle the Duke of Cumberland.

Now I am going to have to go do some further reading. That is just too interesting to stop there.Thanks for the info.(thumbsu

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The harp always represents Ireland and damn you know your stuff condor. I never knew about the house of hanover or why its was advicated. Talk about sexism!!! Thou I know the Brit royals and the German royals are all the same blood line. As to are multiple of the American presidents. In which are are traced back to the Merovingian bloodline. Which may I add is a very interesting read. The worlds elite has always been and always will be. Thou respect to those who won and thought there way to the top through  intelligence and pure genius ie the Rothchilds. Right from the battle of waterloo and the manipulation of the stock market. Woo this post has got deep and Ive learnt something I didnt know. Love history. 

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Yes, BC, I'm given to understand that the house of Saxe-Coburg-Gotha decided right around WWI that "Windsor" would sound a lot more English than "Saxe-Coburg-Gotha" (can't say as I disagree), and that "Mountbatten" would make the Teutonic roots of folks named "Battenberg" a little less grating on the patriotic ear. Anything that sounded Krautacular (I'm half German so I can say that; my own forebears were first- and second-generation German-Americans at that time) got people worked up. When Eddie Rickenbacker showed up to fight in WWI, his autobiography tells that he got a lot of suspicious treatment from the British, suspecting he might be a spy. D'oh; Rickenbacker's parents were both Swiss-German. Switzerland, of course, was Neuty McNeutral.

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Similar things happened here in the US as well, especially in the mid-west.  This area had largely been settled by immigrants from Germany.  There were many german newspapers, german beer gardens, a german-american league, and many banks with "german" in the name.  Once the US entered the war most of these changed their names to get rid of the "german" connection.  Most of he beer brewing firms in the US were also owned by german families and around that time they either started changing their names or adding American patriotic emblems on their products, or both.

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