discovery coins
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this coin is struck what i think is a flying eagle cent. these are some images. need input on coin to make descion to send off to grading the 1958 d ddo ddr error coin. this is the 1st from the denver mint that is also doubled on reverse. seen also on reverse is a large lamination crack and peels  

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Edited by youngmagg
just wanted to post other coin in the same foreum

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Welcome to the forum,

I don’t see anything out of the ordinary that would be worth more than face value. Try to be objective when looking at coins and don’t let potential value affect what you “see”.

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I'm not even sure what you believe happened to the coin, or why their pictures are juxtapositioned thus, but I see part of a really pretty FEC and a heavily worn modern Linc with the copper plating well gone on the high points. If you think that you have a modern Lincoln cent struck on a Flying Eagle planchet (or perhaps a worn nearly flat FA-2 example), I'd say not only that I see zero evidence of that, but that the possibility is too remote to consider.

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1 hour ago, JKK said:

I'm not even sure what you believe happened to the coin, or why their pictures are juxtapositioned thus, but I see part of a really pretty FEC and a heavily worn modern Linc with the copper plating well gone on the high points. If you think that you have a modern Lincoln cent struck on a Flying Eagle planchet (or perhaps a worn nearly flat FA-2 example), I'd say not only that I see zero evidence of that, but that the possibility is too remote to consider.

Agreed with all of the above.  I think that you just have a beat up modern cent.  Nothing special about it.

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I'm not sure what you're trying to ask here.  If the Flying Eagle cent, which is supposed to weigh about 4.5 grams, is yours, it's a nice coin and should be graded.  The 1999-D cent, which is supposed to weigh 2.5 grams, looks environmentally damaged on the obverse, and struck through grease on the reverse.  The 1958-D, weighing 3.1 grams, does not show doubling from what I can see, and appears to have a small lamination on the reverse.  Neither of the Lincolns are worth grading.  The weights are different because the metallic composition has changed over the years.

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thanks i wiil continue on to the next coin. i have a ? is a split seriff something you look for  as an indicator to look for when determening if coin is doubled or not ?

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17 minutes ago, youngmagg said:

thanks i wiil continue on to the next coin. i have a ? is a split seriff something you look for  as an indicator to look for when determening if coin is doubled or not ?

The characteristics are different for every doubled die.....so, I'd say no on the split serif thing.  What I would recommend is going over to NGC's Variety Plus page and look at the photos of genuine doubled die coins.  You'll begin to see the characteristics of genuine doubled dies that way, which will help you in your future evaluations of coins.  That's how I learned to discern doubled dies myself, by looking at examples.

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thanks i wiil continue on to the next coin. i have a ? is a split seriff something you look for  as an indicator to look for when determening if coin is doubled or not ? 

thank i will do that

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Yes, you discovered this coin, it is yours. Split seriffs are indicators that a doubled die may exist, be care of machine doubling which is often confused as true doubled dies.

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 finding these coins was not hard making a financial gain from them seems  to be harder.  mr wooden jefferson may ask a ? from the time you became a coin enthusiast has their been any coin that have been found and label a discovery coins. what characteristics do you look for in a discovery coin. i am a recent coin enthusiast so and dont know many facts. i know  i have been doing this only a short time but my opinion a  do think this is such a coin and iam saying this not just because it's my coin. let me know what you think. respectfully young mag

Edited by youngmagg

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In my opinion, neither the 1999 D nor the 1958 D are worth spending the time and money necessary to send off and have attributed, so I would carry them to a local coin dealer or coin show, and let someone look at them in person - maybe let several people look at them, in fact. That should tell you what you need to know. Good luck.

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What you are up against is that if there were a lot of easy money in pocket change, more people would be doing it. It's not that one can never find anything; it's that doing so takes more time and energy than most people consider a worthwhile return when money is the objective. When the objective is hobby-related, that's different.

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the 1958  is a ddo ddr error coin . a mr. james wildes from veriety vista has this coin down on paper so it dose exist but he only shows obverse of coin and it matches perfectlly with this one the plus side is that this coin is also doubled on all of reverse their is split serifs on every letter  also has a large crack thats why i am saying it is a dicovery coin . or maybe iam getting a bit ahead of my self. do you know of any collectors who might find interest in these two coins i am willing to negociate them raw as long as the purchaser knows his coin facts. and this offer is for any one who wiil negotiate raw coins i am all ears hit me up . respectfully ymagg

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On 1/16/2019 at 10:00 PM, youngmagg said:

yeah as for right at this time i am focusing on the financial gain on coins. respectfully youngmag

I hate to say it, but that's going to be a tough go if you're jumping right into coins as a beginner trying to make money.   Making money with coins can be done, in fact I do it on a regular basis, but most people who manage to make money with coins have started as hobbyists and have gained years and even decades of experience as hobbyists before they ever make a profit from any coin related venture and it's nearly impossible to make serious profit just by looking through pocket change.  It's just too much of a needle in a haystack kind of thing.  There are some valuable coins still out there but you'll have to look through A LOT of coins to find anything valuable out in the wild today.  I'm not trying to discourage you but.....in most cases, diving into coins as a beginner with the goal being a quick and easy financial gain is typically a very good way to end up losing money and growing to hate it.  I now sell coins on a regular basis, but I was simply a collector for over 10 years before I ever sold a coin for any reason besides trying to fund another collectible purchase (or a couple of auto repairs), and even then I had some serious bumps along the way.  This is just the reality of the situation.  Coins are something to do because you love coins, not to jump into as a newbie expecting a quick and easy pay day because such a thing likely will not happen.  If I were in your shoes, I'd really stop and think about this and if this pursuit is the right thing for you.  There are investments out there that require a lot less time and knowledge if financial gain is your motivation, and I'd strongly suggest exploring these avenues, based on what you have said on here.  However, if you find yourself becoming fascinated with coins for their own sake, and not for financial gain, then I'd keep pursuing coins.  Of course, the decision is yours to make, but I've seen others take this kind of path in the 20 years that I've been doing this consistently and it never ends well.  Coins can absolutely make good investments, but they are often long-term investments that take years or decades to appreciate beyond the price you paid for them initially.  They are not good for turning a quick buck without a lot of knowledge, a lot of effort and, yes, a good bit of luck sometimes.  

Edited by Mohawk
Typo

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Back in the 50's and 60's there were many neat coins still to be found in circulation, easily spotted without a loupe. My best friend and I spent countless hours going through rolls from the bank, going through change from various sources. It was a lot of fun, and it paid off, a little. But whatever financial gain we made probably worked out to a dollar or two per hour, if that. Big money if you're 10 years old, not so much if you're an adult. I did better when I graduated to mint state coins, buying at the right time, guessing where the market was going for certain series. But, in retrospect my gains as an adult were due mostly to patience and very much due to luck. If I were to go into the business of specializing in varieties, I would let someone else do the hard job of looking and focus on intermediating. 

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4 hours ago, LINCOLNMAN said:

Back in the 50's and 60's there were many neat coins still to be found in circulation, easily spotted without a loupe. My best friend and I spent countless hours going through rolls from the bank, going through change from various sources. It was a lot of fun, and it paid off, a little. But whatever financial gain we made probably worked out to a dollar or two per hour, if that. Big money if you're 10 years old, not so much if you're an adult. I did better when I graduated to mint state coins, buying at the right time, guessing where the market was going for certain series. But, in retrospect my gains as an adult were due mostly to patience and very much due to luck. If I were to go into the business of specializing in varieties, I would let someone else do the hard job of looking and focus on intermediating. 

It sounds like you guys were doing it for exactly the right reasons, and I could see how it would have been more profitable then.  However, even then it was a tough go.....as you said, great profit for a couple of 10 year old kids, not so great for an adult.  I look through rolls myself now, but I don't expect to make a great profit at it.  I have found some good things ( the best were a couple of 1984 Doubled Die obverse Lincoln Cents) but I had to look through literally thousands of coins to locate them.  However, I find looking through rolls relaxing and when I've hit a roadblock working on my schoolwork, looking through a few rolls of coins is a great way for me to decompress and, as a result, get me over the block and moving again.  So I get something out of my hunting whether I find anything or not.  As for varieties, that's actually a huge part of what I do with selling coins now......I do the looking and the selling, but I also enjoy that, too.  The profit is a nice thing, don't get me wrong, but I like hunting for varieties and I like selling them to collectors who are excited to finally have that tough coin for their collections....that's one of the best parts of it for me.  I like making other collectors happy.  I know that feeling of finally getting that key date or famous variety.  It's a great feeling and I love being part of that feeling and moment for others.

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1 hour ago, Mohawk said:

It sounds like you guys were doing it for exactly the right reasons, and I could see how it would have been more profitable then.  However, even then it was a tough go.....as you said, great profit for a couple of 10 year old kids, not so great for an adult.  I look through rolls myself now, but I don't expect to make a great profit at it.  I have found some good things ( the best were a couple of 1984 Doubled Die obverse Lincoln Cents) but I had to look through literally thousands of coins to locate them.  However, I find looking through rolls relaxing and when I've hit a roadblock working on my schoolwork, looking through a few rolls of coins is a great way for me to decompress and, as a result, get me over the block and moving again.  So I get something out of my hunting whether I find anything or not.  As for varieties, that's actually a huge part of what I do with selling coins now......I do the looking and the selling, but I also enjoy that, too.  The profit is a nice thing, don't get me wrong, but I like hunting for varieties and I like selling them to collectors who are excited to finally have that tough coin for their collections....that's one of the best parts of it for me.  I like making other collectors happy.  I know that feeling of finally getting that key date or famous variety.  It's a great feeling and I love being part of that feeling and moment for others.

Sounds like great fun and very relaxing. I find that much of the enjoyment is in the hunt. Off topic, the wife dragged me to a quilt show years ago. She bought one of the prize winners to hang on the wall. The price seemed modest compared to what I guessed was involved in the creation. For fun I asked the lady how much she reckoned she made per hour. She laughed and said, "maybe as much as a dollar, but it pays for the materials, I love doing it and I love creating something that others can enjoy". 

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22 minutes ago, LINCOLNMAN said:

Sounds like great fun and very relaxing. I find that much of the enjoyment is in the hunt. Off topic, the wife dragged me to a quilt show years ago. She bought one of the prize winners to hang on the wall. The price seemed modest compared to what I guessed was involved in the creation. For fun I asked the lady how much she reckoned she made per hour. She laughed and said, "maybe as much as a dollar, but it pays for the materials, I love doing it and I love creating something that others can enjoy". 

I love it!  There's no replacement for passion and talent.  That quilter is another who is doing what they do for exactly the right reasons! Kudos to her and to you guys for supporting her venture and giving one of her creations a good home!

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On 1/16/2019 at 10:24 PM, youngmagg said:

the 1958  is a ddo ddr error coin . a mr. james wildes from veriety vista has this coin down on paper so it dose exist but he only shows obverse of coin and it matches perfectlly with this one the plus side is that this coin is also doubled on all of reverse their is split serifs on every letter  also has a large crack thats why i am saying it is a dicovery coin . or maybe iam getting a bit ahead of my self. do you know of any collectors who might find interest in these two coins i am willing to negociate them raw as long as the purchaser knows his coin facts. and this offer is for any one who wiil negotiate raw coins i am all ears hit me up . respectfully ymagg

Sadly, from what I see, you don't have anything of value.  You appear to have a regular 1958-D Wheat Cent and a regular 1999-D Memorial Cent.  I see no errors or anything based on your photos.  Dealers sometimes will buy Wheat Cents for 2 cents a piece if you have a very large lot of them and there would be no premium attached to the 1999-D at all.  I don't think that there would be any party interested in paying anything for the two coins you've shown us.

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12 minutes ago, Mohawk said:

Sadly, from what I see, you don't have anything of value.  You appear to have a regular 1958-D Wheat Cent and a regular 1999-D Memorial Cent.  I see no errors or anything based on your photos.  Dealers sometimes will buy Wheat Cents for 2 cents a piece if you have a very large lot of them and there would be no premium attached to the 1999-D at all.  I don't think that there would be any party interested in paying anything for the two coins you've shown us.

I agree with you and particularly the post above where you recommended other options for financial gain.  I suspect what is in effect here is the minimal financial capital required to search through circulating coinage versus other options.  To make any "big money" in the stock market you have to start with at least a decent amount of money, unless you hit the jackpot with options or an Amazon.

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1 minute ago, World Colonial said:

I agree with you and particularly the post above where you recommended other options for financial gain.  I suspect what is in effect here is the minimal financial capital required to search through circulating coinage versus other options.  To make any "big money" in the stock market you have to start with at least a decent amount of money, unless you hit the jackpot with options or an Amazon.

And I agree with you World Colonial, as I often do in discussions where we both participate.  In most ventures, you do need decent starting capital to experience big gains.  Jackpots gained through minimal outlay of funds and effort in this world are extremely rare occurrences.

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thank you fellows for the advice opinions it really is nice to get feed back without negative critism . I am saying this with all seriouness and respect i had a  not so good experience with the people of coin talk well not all the only member or   coin expert that did help me out was tammig . you should check out their commentary on my posts. i was probably the member with the shortest membership ever.   just punch in 1999 d ddo ddr error coin or 1958 d ddo ddr error coin you will see what i am talking about. 

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24 minutes ago, youngmagg said:

thank you fellows for the advice opinions it really is nice to get feed back without negative critism . I am saying this with all seriouness and respect i had a  not so good experience with the people of coin talk well not all the only member or   coin expert that did help me out was tammig . you should check out their commentary on my posts. i was probably the member with the shortest membership ever.   just punch in 1999 d ddo ddr error coin or 1958 d ddo ddr error coin you will see what i am talking about. 

Yeah.......those guys on Coin Talk were nasty, and that was completely unnecessary.  I was a member there years ago.  I'm not now and you've seen why.  I don't like the nastiness and pettiness I've seen there myself.  I'm also glad that you saw my posts for what they are, honest feedback and perspectives from someone with years of experience who wants to help.  Sometimes honest answers are not the ones being sought, but there's a way to do so politely and with respect.  I think many members over there have forgotten that, and that's unfortunate.

~Tom 

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