Early Commemoratives For Life
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3 hours ago, 1946Hamm said:

Leeg; Sure go ahead and use the pics.  Credit " Gary Hamm " that's me, if you want.

Cool. Thanks Gary.

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Some very nice commemoratives posted so far.  Originally, I decided to collect the ones that had a connection to Virginia, my home state.  Then I added animals. Finally I just threw in the towel and decided to collect any that I found appealing.  Which is most of them! Glad you are still working on the book, Lee. I know it's full of detailed history. 

Kaz

 

Comm Wash-Carv toned obv.jpg

Comm Wash-Carv toned rev.jpg

commem Lafayette dollar obv.jpg

commem Lafayette dollar rev.jpg

Edited by Porous Planchet

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Thanks Kaz. Happy to see you here.

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I feel like adding a little history today.  I was born in Wisconsin so we'll talk about that commem for a little bit.

Not many collector's seem to like the design of the Wisconsin which is fine.

There was ZERO discussion among any of the coin dealers, collector's or press around this piece, unlike a few other 1936 issues.

I've had several of the original medals with original packaging. The coin and medal is the only one that was issued as a Territory, not the date of entry to the  Union. Ha, how about that. This is my latest:

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I was surprised that they are not that hard to find with the original packaging. Design info:

Wisconsin So-Called-Dollar. Medal commemorates 100th anniversary as territory, not State­hood, Wisconsin having been admitted to Union May 29, 1848. Legislature created Wisconsin Centennial, Inc. 1933 with $500 appropriation, later increased. Celebration was state-wide, highlight being presentation of pageant, "Centennial Cavalcade of Wisconsin," in stadium of University of WisconsinMadison, June 27-July 5, 1936; "witnessed by at least 75,000 spectators."

 

This was official medal, sponsored and designed by Commis­sion; 1,500 pieces struck in Bronze; sold for $1.

 

Obv: Capitol building, clouds behind; at base on small ribbon 1936; smaller edifice to l.; at base, on small ribbon 1836; above all, around Wisconsin Territorial Centennial; below all is prone animal (badger? yes-LG) on dotted line.

Rev: Eagle in upper center panel; to l. 19 / June / 27, to r. 36 / July / 5; above at border Madison; below panel  Official / Wisconsin /Centennial / Celebration; stars all around at border.  HK-696  Bronze. 37mm., Scarce.

I currently do not have a Wisconsin in my collection. It's funny that whenever I have a Wisconsin in my collection, with nice color, folks "pay up" to take it from me. I do oblige, every coin has it's price.

I'm tired. That's it for today.

More to follow on the Wisconsin.  :smile:

 

The original design for this coin was made by Mr. David Parsons, an art student of the University of Wisconsin. The design was further developed and prepared for minting by Mr. Benjamin Hawkins, a well known sculptor of New York City. Collectors desiring specimens could obtain them by writing Mr. John Callahan, (Chairman of the Commission) State Superintendent of Public Instruction, Madison, Wisconsin. The price was $1.50 per coin, plus seven cents for postage and insurance for the first coin and two cents for each additional one ordered.

The Wisconsin Territory included parts of the present Dakotas, Minnesota and Illinois. The first Territorial Governor, Henry Dodge, an appointee of President Jackson, took office on Independence Day, 1836, as noted on the coin.

It is worthy of special note that this issue does not commemorate the centennial of admission into the Union, which was an occasion for many State commemorative issues. The Wisconsin half-dollar anticipates by twelve years the State centennial of admission into the Union.

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Rejected model by David Parsons. Taxay p. 202.

 

Edited by leeg
Added Text

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The bracelet is really cool.

Can you PM me the details around this bracelet.

Another one for the book.  :smile:

Edited by leeg

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Added more info on the Wisconsin above.

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1 hour ago, leeg said:

Added more info on the Wisconsin above.

When you typed that there was no Coverage from Collectors, Dealer's or Press on the coin unlike other 1936 issues...was that because of the abuse of the program and who was involved in the programs from conception to committees to strikings and (Special and Regular), I read some Prominent Coin Dealers at the time were responsible for distribution or Something? Gutag? Family or something I can't remember which coins they were involved with, I know Stacks did a huge run up to an auction of some of the original ones several years ago but don't know which coins they were involved in..for what you posted though I was just wondering why it didn't get any coverage...probably cuz the Honest People were involved in its creation, selling and distribution..If you know please tell......

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On 12/8/2018 at 11:09 PM, Numismatic, A.A.S. said:

When you typed that there was no Coverage from Collectors, Dealer's or Press on the coin unlike other 1936 issues...was that because of the abuse of the program and who was involved in the programs from conception to committees to strikings and (Special and Regular), I read some Prominent Coin Dealers at the time were responsible for distribution or Something? Gutag? Family or something I can't remember which coins they were involved with, I know Stacks did a huge run up to an auction of some of the original ones several years ago but don't know which coins they were involved in..for what you posted though I was just wondering why it didn't get any coverage...probably cuz the Honest People were involved in its creation, selling and distribution..If you know please tell......

 
The 1936 Wisconsin Centennial half dollar was yet another commemorative issue that honored event of no real national significance. In this case, it was the 100th, anniversary of the founding of the Wisconsin territory. It seems the coin was essentially an afterthought, as the centennial celebrations were to be held on July 4th of 1936, and the legislation authorizing the mintage of no less than 25,000 coins was not passed until May 15th of that year.
 
The U.S. Mint used this as one part of their reasoning why the early commemoratives were soon to disappear until 1946.
 
I'll discuss the Guttag brothers (New Rochelle) in a later history lesson.
Edited by leeg

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1938 New Rochelle Half Dollar

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25,015 pieces coined at the Philadelphia Mint with 13 pieces reserved for annual assay and 9,749 melted. Initial design given to Lorillard Wise who then resigned his commission. Miss Gertrude K. Lathrop of Albany, N.Y., finished the design. Distributed by the New Rochelle Commemorative Coin Committee, Mr. Pitt M. Skipton, chairman. Image courtesy of Stacks Bowers Galleries, Guttag Family Collection Part I, 2011 Chicago ANA Coin Auction.

Approved by Congress on May 5, 1936, and issued in commemoration of the two hundred and fiftieth anniversary of the founding and settlement of the city of New Rochelle, New York. 

Design:

Obverse: Lord John Pell1 standing holding fatted calf by a rope; around upper border, * SETTLED • 1688 • INCORPORATED • 1899 * (IN of INCORPORATED touches John Pell’s hat), around lower border NEW • ROCHELLE • NEW • YORK ; in lower right field, opposite Y, in YORK, the designer’s initials, in relief: GKL. 

Reverse: The fleur-de-lis2 as on the seal of the city; below, 1938; around outer border, at top, UNITED • STATES • OF • AMERICA; around lower border, HALF • DOLLAR; in inner circle, E • PLURIBUS • UNUM • LIBERTY • IN • GOD • WE • TRUST. 

Lorillard Wise was initially commissioned to do the models for this coin. His models were approved then subsequently disapproved by the Commission of Fine Arts in Washington, D.C. Miss Gertrude K. Lathrop was then commissioned to design and submit models for the coin which were approved by the Commission of Fine Arts and the Secretary of the Treasury. The coins were distributed by the New Rochelle Commemorative Coin Committee, Mr. Pitt M. Skipton, chairman. 

1 One Fatt Calfe, poem ‘The New Rochelle Half Dollar,’ and p. 10.

2 The fleur-de-lis (or fleur-de-lys; plural: fleurs-de-lis; French pronunciation: [flœʁ də li] is a stylized lily (in French, fleur means flower, and lis means lily) or iris that is used as a decorative design or symbol.  The English translation of "fleur-de-lis" (sometimes spelled ‘fleur-de-lys’) is ‘flower of the lily.’ This symbol, depicting a stylized lily or lotus flower, has many meanings. Traditionally, it has been used to represent French royalty, and in that sense it is said to signify perfection, light, and life. Legend has it that an angel presented Clovis, the Merovingian king of the Franks, with a golden lily as a symbol of his purification upon his conversion to Christianity. Others claim that Clovis adopted the symbol when water lilies showed him how to safely cross a river and thus succeed in battle.

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Julius Guttag, who was primarily in the securities business, dabbled in numismatics during the 1920s and 1930s. Advertisements filled with superlatives were placed by the Guttag Brothers in various publications. The brothers specialty was South American coins. From An Inside View of the Coin Hobby in the 1930s: The Walter P. Nichols File, Edited by Q. David Bowers, Bowers and Merena Galleries, Inc., Copyright 1984 by Bowers and Merena Galleries, Inc, p. 37.

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Despite the objection of President Roosevelt to further issues of commemorative coins, and the possibility that he may veto bills providing for them that reach him, Congress had proceeded to consider bills authorizing several new issues and changes in two other issues, the maximum number of which have not been coined.

This issue was unique in that it was the first early commemorative coin to be asked for by an organization of coin collectors, The Westchester County Coin Club.

In early January of 1936 Senator Copeland, of New York, introduced a bill providing for the coinage of a half dollar in commemoration of the 250th anniversary of the founding of New Rochelle, N. Y.

Senator Copeland’s bill had several unique, problematic, aspects to it:

Total coinage numbers were not listed. Unlimited coinage numbers and years to mint them?

Shall be coined ‘at the mints’ which meant ‘D’ and ‘S’ varieties were allowed. Not in favor by collectors at the time.

The coins were to be issued to the Westchester Coin Club of New Rochelle, NY. There was no such coin club in existence at that time. It should have stated Westchester ‘County’ Coin Club.

Nowhere in the bill was it stated to what use the profit from the sale of the coins were to be used.

Was it not just possible that every coin club in the country would search the history of its City or State to find some event worthy of being commemorated? Would not the Westchester County Coin Club, with its coffers swollen to enormous size, be the envy of every other coin club?

On January 22, 1936 a Bill originating in the House of Representatives was introduced which removed all the unique features of the New Rochelle half dollar bill referred to above. In most respects the bill was similar to the one previously introduced in the Senate, but it provided for an issue of 20,000 half dollars, which are to be issued ‘only upon the request of the committee, person or persons duly authorized by the Mayor of the City of New Rochelle, N. Y.,’ and ‘all proceeds shall be used in furtherance of the commemoration of the founding of the City of New Rochelle, N. Y.’

On February 18th a report from the Committee on Coinage, Weights and Measures reported favorably on the bill for the New Rochelle half dollar.

On March 16th the Bill authorizing the half dollar for New Rochelle, N.Y., having been entirely rewritten, passed the House. It provided that ‘there shall be coined at a mint of the United States to be designated by the Director of the Mint not to exceed 25,000 silver 50-cent pieces.’ It also provided that ‘no such coins shall be issued after the expiration of one year after the date of enactment of this act.’ As written it also passed the Senate.

Enjoy.

Edited by leeg

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Wow, that was an interesting read! I fear that when your book is done and I have read it I will have no choice but to start collecting these coins. I have always found them interesting, but just never pulled the trigger on buying one. Perhaps your book will be the push I need. 

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12 hours ago, coinsandmedals said:

Wow, that was an interesting read! I fear that when your book is done and I have read it I will have no choice but to start collecting these coins. I have always found them interesting, but just never pulled the trigger on buying one. Perhaps your book will be the push I need. 

Thanks.  I'm sure the book will push you to start a set.  :smile:

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Book probably three volumes.

Happy New Year!

I'll start 2019 with some images from this pamphlet:

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Edited by leeg

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Thanks to all of those who've contributed!

RCNH%20Rhode%20Island%20Combo%201%20BB.j

Designed and modeled by John Howard Benson and Arthur Graham Carey both of Newport, Rhode Island, and distributed by Arthur L. Philbrick, vice-president and treasurer of the Rhode Island and Providence Plantations Tercentenary Committee, Inc. Mintage figures: Philadelphia Jan 1936–20,013, Denver Feb 1936–15,010 and San Francisco Feb 1936 –15,011. Image courtesy of Rare Coins of New Hampshire (RCNH) a coin in my collection.

Approved by Congress on May 2, 1935 and issued to commemorate the three-hundredth anniversary of the founding of the city of Providence, the first settlement in Rhode Island, by the great leader Roger Williams. 

Design:

Obverse: Roger Williams kneeling in canoe, holding Bible, being welcomed by an Indian at State Rock; sun with rays in background; behind Indian a stalk of maize; above, in small letters, LIBERTY; around border in large letters, 1636-1936: RHODE ISLAND. 

Reverse: Shield of Rhode Island; the anchor of hope on a mantle; on ribbon above, HOPE (standing for the authority of State); below, E. PLURIBUS UNUM (standing for the authority of the nation); around border, in large letters, UNITED. STATES. OF. AMERICA. HALF. DOLLAR.

The Providence Plantations were the first white settlements in Rhode Island. The clergyman Roger Williams, banished by the General Court of Massachusetts Bay for propagating ‘new and dangerous opinions,’ founded the Providence Plantations in June 1636. Williams bought a large tract of land from the Narragansett Indians, and in 1638 joined with twelve other settlers in forming a land company. Their covenant provided for majority rule and allowed religious liberty. Other religious dissidents fleeing the Bay Colony's orthodox Congregationalism founded towns at Narragansett, Newport, Pawtuxet, Pocasset, and Warwick by 1643. To protect local land titles, Williams petitioned Parliament to recognize Providence, Newport, and Portsmouth as a charter colony, and the charter was issued on 24 March 1644 as the Incorporation of Providence Plantations in the Narragansett Bay in New England (adding Warwick in 1647). After the Restoration, Williams received a royal charter from Charles II in 1663 confirming the parliamentary charter. . .1

1 Courtesy Encyclopedia dot com.

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John Howard Benson

John Howard Benson and A. Graham Carey, artists of this city, were among those who voluntarily worked on the project before announcement was made of a competition among Rhode Island artists in designing the Providence Tercentenary memorial 50 cent piece by former Judge Ira Lloyd Letts, chairman of the Rhode Island Tercentenary Jubilee committee. For a design acceptable to the United States Treasury the winning artist will receive $250 and 10 of the coins. Second prize will be $100 and five coins. The committee will accept entries until noon of Monday, September 23, at its office in the Hospital Trust building.

    The designs will be judged by Dr. Royal B. Farnum, educational director of the Rhode Island School of Design; Howard W. Chapin, librarian of the Rhode Island Historical Society; Henry D Sharpe, Judge Letts, and a woman member of the Tercentenary committee, who will be designated later.2

2 The Newport Mercury and Weekly News, Rhode Island Artists Enter Competition; Prizes to be Awarded for Best Design, for Tercentenary 50-cent piece. Friday, August 30, 1935.

An unprecedented demand for the tercentenary half dollars resulted in the complete sale of all the 50,000 coins available in less than a day throughout the state. All the half dollars, which sold at a dollar each and which were designed by John Howard Benson and Arthur Graham Carey of this city, available in Newport were gone by 9:30 last Friday. Bank officials, surprised at the great interest shown, sought in vain to secure additional coins from headquarters in Providence.

    The Newport Trust Company disposed of its entire allotment of 200 coins Thursday. The Aquidnecit National Bank distributed 150 on orders, and have another 168 requested, which it hopes to secure from state headquarters. The Savings Bank had 175, the last of which went at 9:30 this morning. The Newport National Bank’s quota of 100 was disposed of in a few hours.

    Nothing like the interest indicated had been expected. Arthur L. Philbrick of Providence, treasurer of the tercentenary committee, declared the sale one of the most encouraging features of the observance thus far, indicating, he said a far greater interest in the celebration than anyone had suspected.” The committee disposed of 45,000 of the congressionally authorized coins through the 30 banks of the state within six hours, and held 5,000 more to fill previous orders received.

    Rhode Island’s interest in the coins is all the more remarkable, it was said, because of the experience of Connecticut. That state, with a population twice the size of Rhode Island, had 20,000 coins minted for its tercentenary last year. After two months so many of the Connecticut coins remained unsold that they were turned back to the Treasury and melted down for other coinage uses, Mr. Philbrick said.

    Further interest in the Rhode Island coins is evidenced in the action of Congress prohibiting the minting of any more coins of this nature. These may be the last memorial coins authorized, although the House has since passed a measure authorizing a coin for Charleston, S. C.11

11 The Newport Mercury And Weekly News, Tercentenary Coins All Sold First Day, Unprecedented Demand Shows Great Interest In Jubilee, 50,000 Half Dollars Available Throughout State Disposed of in Less Than Day, Friday, March 13, 1936.

#11 above is not correct. The

    Three weeks ago I went to Providence, R. I., to see how scarce the Rhode Island half dollars were. The following is what I learned: I was told that an influential banker had scooped up eleven hundred sets of these Rhode Island halves and at present was disposing of them in lots of five or ten sets at the highest market price. Also, that a bank in Providence still had the half dollars, but would only give them out to its depositors. Another one is about the man who went from bank to bank the day they were issued and filled a Boston bag full. The man who told me the above was offered 450 Rhode Island halves the day they were issued by a bank employee and turned them down because he is not interested in coins. He is a stamp dealer. Let’s have more commemorative half dollars. 

BOSTONIAN.17

17 The Numismatist, Rhode Island Half Dollars, July, 1936, p. 510.

 

Edited by leeg

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