Early Commemoratives For Life
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I'm a big fan of the early commemorative coins. I don't think they get the love they should.

Post them whenever you can Monday thru Sunday.

When you post your image of an early commemorative state who you purchased it from.

That helps new collectors find good dealers in the early commemorative series.

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162,099 coined, 99 for assay, 86 melted, leaving 162,013 outstanding, which sold at one dollar each.  Designed and modeled by Chester Beach. Distributed by Mr. Harold E. Orendorff, the Chairman of the Publicity Committee, for the town of Lexington and the Hon. Judge Prescott Keys for the town of Concord. On February 4, Concord artist Philip Holden sent Chester Beach improved sketches for both sides.

Issued to commemorate the one hundred and fiftieth anniversary of the Battle of Lexington and Concord, authorizing an appropriation to be utilized in connection with such observance, and for other purposes.

After the conspicuous success of the Monroe Doctrine coin, the Mint authorities actually recommended Chester Beach for new memorial issues. Thus, in December 1924, when Congress was considering legislation for a Battle of Lexington half dollar, the Lexington town committee asked the artist whether he would design their coin.10 This led to a protracted discussion of fee (sponsoring committees are occasionally parsimonious when dealing with sculptors), after which Beach accepted the job at a reduced rate.

10. The coin was authorized on January 14, 1925. Taxay, p. 79.

Beach soon discovered that he was dealing with two committees, the latter of whom was celebrating the sesquicentennial of the Concord fight. In a letter of February 2, 1925 Judge Prescott Keyes, chairman of the Concord committee, wrote to the artist:

Dear Sir: After consultation with Mr. H.C. Blake who has been in correspondence with you as to a plaster model of the Lexington-Concord Sesquicentennial coin, I am sending you herewith the suggested design for the Concord side.

Mr. Blake I understand is sending you the suggested design for the Lexington side.

I shall send you tomorrow a more carefully executed design for each side. Very truly.

I assume that you know what this means.

I will report to my Lexington Committee tonight and have a formal letter sent on by them, together with the Concord Committee, by which the terms agreed on between you and me and by the correspondence will be carried into effect; that is, that for twelve hundred and fifty dollars ($1250) you will do the necessary work of preparing the model and guaranteeing its approval by the Fine Arts Commission, and will go about it at once so that there will be no delay.

I understand that this agreeable also to the Concord Committee, and I have requested them to forward you immediately such a copy of the Concord Minute Man as they desire to have you use on the coin.

The coin, as I told you, will have on one side the Concord Minute Man and the legal language required, as you pointed out, ‘United States of America,’ ‘In God We Trust,’ ‘1925,’ ‘Half Dollar.’ On the Lexington side will be a reproduction of the old belfry, the photograph of which should have reached you by this time, and the words ‘Old Belfry Lexington,’ and around the rim ‘Lexington-Concord Sesquicentennial, 1775-1925.’ I understand that you are to see the sculptor, Daniel Chester French, to see whether he is agreeable, or has nay objection, to the addition of the words on the Concord side ‘Minute Man Concord,’ or something of that sort.

I am sending a copy of this letter to Honorable John w. weeks Secretary of War, who is Chairman of the Commission upon the part of the Federal Government, as I have already telegraphed his to cut all the ‘red-tape’ so that the approval, which you say is necessary to be given by Secretary of the Treasury Mellon, may be given at once.

I am sending copies of this letter also to Mr. Hallie C. Blake, the Chairman of our Finance Committee in Lexington, and to Honorable Prescott Keyes, the Chairman of the Concord Committee. Yours very truly.

 

Bought this one on eBay.

 Enjoy and post away.

 

Edited by leeg

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52 minutes ago, leeg said:

I'm a big fan of the early commemorative coins. I don't think they get the love they should.

There are many collectors who think the coin or series they collect should be worth more.  I have seen this implied or explicit claim numerous times since I joined this forum, on other forums occasionally and in the numismatic press regularly.  Because if this isn't the claim, what else is it?  There are almost certainly at least as many collectors of this series now versus the late 1980's when prices peaked, arguably more due to less financial buying,  Those who still collect it presumably "love it" just as much as their predecessors, only at consistently lower prices since the TPG bubble burst.

And yes, I do think the coin you posted is a nice one.

Edited by World Colonial

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39 minutes ago, World Colonial said:

There are many collectors who think the coin or series they collect should be worth more.  I have seen this implied or explicit claim numerous times since I joined this forum, on other forums occasionally and in the numismatic press regularly.  Because if this isn't the claim, what else is it?  There are almost certainly at least as many collectors of this series now versus the late 1980's when prices peaked, arguably more due to less financial buying,  Those who still collect it presumably "love it" just as much as their predecessors, only at consistently lower prices since the TPG bubble burst.

And yes, I do think the coin you posted is a nice one.

Some good points you have raised. Thanks for contributing.

Purchased on eBay.

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On ‎10‎/‎29‎/‎2018 at 12:05 AM, rrantique said:

Don't remember when I got this one. Stone Mountain.

stone mountain.jpg

 A lot of history behind this coin.

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Purchased out of a Heritage auction in 2007.

Edited by leeg

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I enjoy the history behind these but they don't really speak to me to collect them really.  But for one reason or another I do have two, I liked the color on the Columbian, its in an old style holder, and ships on coins are cool.  The Oregon is for my 7070, apologies in advance for the poor quality pics.

 

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Nice examples coinbuf and AcesKings.

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Designed by Isaac Scott Hathaway and distributed by Dr. S. J. Phillips, President of the Booker T. Washington Birthplace Memorial Commission. A coin in my collection (64PL), image by Bob Campbell.

Authorized by Congress on August 7, 1946 and issued to commemorate the life and perpetuate the ideals and teachings of Booker T. Washington.

Design:

Obverse: Portrayed is the bust of America’s foremost black educator, Booker Taliaferro Washington. (1858-1915). He is facing three quarters to the right. His name is placed in the lower border, while the words UNITED STATES OF AMERICA are located around the upper border. BTW appears to be looking at the inscription E PLURIBUS UNUM in two lines in the right field. Situated in the left field are the words HALF DOLLAR. Appearing above the denomination is the date of issue. This can be 1946, 1947, 1948, 1949, 1950, or 1951.

Reverse: Depicted is the Hall of Fame, a structure which is composed of a series of columns that are set at regular intervals, which support the base of observed roof structure. This colonnade, located at New York University, or ‘NYU’ as it is known among city residents, houses many busts and tablets honoring famous Americans. Located above the legend LIBERTY in the lower border is the unfortunate residence of Booker T. Washington—a slave cabin. Mintmark (D or S) appears below. In the left field are the words Booker T. Washington birthplace memorial. The motto IN GOD WE TRUST is located in the lower left field. This issue was created by a black designer Isaac Scott Hathaway, who also created the Booker T. Washington—George Washington Carver commemorative half dollars.

Heritage Auctions, 2014, Old Holder, Green CAC, $247

 

Edited by leeg

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I agree.  I've just started appreciating them (against the trend :wink:)  and it's damn FUN!

I can get 10 coins for what I might spend ordinarily for ONE!   

 

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etc. etc, etc.   

 

:smile:

Edited by Rollo Tomassi

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On 11/4/2018 at 11:00 AM, Rollo Tomassi said:

I agree.  I've just started appreciating them (against the trend :wink:)  and it's damn FUN!

I can get 10 coins for what I might spend ordinarily for ONE!   

 

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etc. etc, etc.   

 

:smile:

Very nice examples.

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Very few people alive today have ever seen one of these:

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. . .was purchased with an accompanying certificate issued by the Stone Mountain Confederate Monumental Association, which stated that the coin had been purchased by Willard B. Ellwood. Stone Mountain Confederate Monumental Association Certificate to Willard B. Ellwood for Counterstamp Stone Mountain Half Dollar, VA #63. Courtesy of the American Numismatic Association (ANA). 

 

 

Edited by leeg

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That cert is cool. I've never seen a counterstamped Stone Mountain.

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12 hours ago, LINCOLNMAN said:

Great thread, informative and some very nice coins/ Thanks, 

Appreciate it!

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On 11/8/2018 at 8:19 PM, Numismatic, A.A.S. said:

I like that coin...looks great!!

Thanks.

Had to pay up for it, but well worth it.

Edited by leeg

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1900 Lafayette Memorial Dollar

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Mintage of 50,026 with 26 reserved for Assay. Designed and modeled by C. E. Barber and distributed by the Lafayette Memorial Association, Robert J. Thompson, Secretary. Image courtesy of MJ on the NGC Coin Forum.

Approved by Congress on March 8, 1899 and struck in commemoration of the of a monument to General Lafayette, in the city of Paris, France, by the youth of the United States.

Design:

Obverse: Heads of Washington and Lafayette, Jugate*, overlapping to right; above UNITED • STATES • OF • AMERICA, below: * LAFAYETTE • DOLLAR * All within beaded border. 

Reverse: Equestrian statue of General Lafayette to left, holding in right hand sword pointed downward. On base of statue, palm branch with fourteen leaves, and sculptor’s name: Bartlett. Around border: ERECTED • BY • THE • YOUTH • OF • THE • UNITED • STATES • IN • HONOR • OF • GENERAL • LAFAYETTE; in exergue, * PARIS * 1900 * All within beaded border.

* Two or more portraits on a coin, medal, or escutcheon (a defined area on which armorial bearings are displayed and which usually consists of a shield).

The dies were cut by C.E. Barber, of the Mint; the head of Washington was from the Houdon bust, and head of Lafayette from Peter L. Krider’s Yorktown Centennial Medal of 1881. The statue on the reverse was taken from Bartlett’s sketch before a number of final changes were made and differs in many respects from the statue as it now stands in Paris. Mr. Thomas Hastings of New York designed the pedestal.

In the early part of 1899, the Lafayette Memorial Commission asked Congress to make its Monument appropriation in the form of 100,000 souvenir half-dollars.  This idea soon changed to a silver dollar for a souvenir, and the Lafayette Memorial Dollar came into being by the Act of Congress.

According to the Report of the Director of the Mint for 1900, the silver for this issue, consisting of 38,000.875 ounces of fine silver, was purchased in the open market for $23,032.80 (.5955 per ounce).  This provided for the striking of 50,000 of these coins at the Philadelphia Mint.

The fact that this Act specified that the silver was to be purchased in the market is worthy of note because of the special arrangements in the Columbian issues which provided for the coinage from uncurrent subsidiary silver.

While the designs were in progress, some difficulty arose over the date.  The Commissioners desired the delivery of these pieces as early as possible in the year 1899, although the coins were to bear the date 1900.  It was contrary to the practice of the Mint to anticipate the dating of a coin. The difficulty was happily avoided by wording the inscription ‘Erected by the youth of the United States. . . 1900.’  This date, therefore, was independent of the year in which the coin was struck. 

The coinage took place on December 14th, 1899, the one-hundredth anniversary of the death of Washington.  The entire issue was struck in one day on an old coining-press which made eighty coins per minute.  The first coin struck was forwarded to President McKinley who sent it to the President of the French Republic.

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Lafayette dollar receptacle for first coin struck which was given to French President Loubet. An ornate sterling silver presentation case mounted on an oval rosewood base was created for the first coin; the case was reported as having cost $1,000 to produce. It featured engraved portraits of Washington and Lafayette encircled by wreaths, with a depiction of the allegorical symbols of the United States and France, Columbia and Marianne, respectively, on its lid. The head of an American (Bald) eagle projected from each end of the container, appearing almost as handles. The receptacle’s wood base featured an elaborate engraved shield with the inscription: ‘First Lafayette dollar, presented to the President of the French Republic, M. Emile Loubet, by the President of the United States of America, William McKinley, 1900, A.D.’ Image courtesy of The Report of the Commissioner-General for the United States to the International Universal Exposition, Paris, 1900, VOL I. Ferdinand W. Peck submitted this report to President McKinley on February 25, 1901, p. 172. I couldn’t find who has this. I emailed several Paris Museums-LG

Edited by leeg

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On 11/12/2018 at 6:26 PM, leeg said:

Thanks.

Had to pay up for it, but well worth it.

Yes it is...I can't remember what show but someone had like 6 or 7 different obverse's in a display thing representing the different die types or something??? None of them looked even close to as good as yours but he said one had certain die diagnostic that was really rare and so on...I had just bought a vibrant colored, completely bathed in color CAC Sticker Commemorative from a well respected dealer/collector in North Carolina...so I had to pass on all these examples he had, he described one he saw get sold though like yours, probably wasn't but it went for big bucks..but I need to get a pick of if this one I'm talking about...anyway..

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Thanks.

I know the feeling.  :smile:

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Edited by leeg

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Great thread with some great coins. Rollo- was wondering if the Bay Bridge has been graded? Thanks...

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On 10/31/2018 at 3:26 PM, AcesKings said:

My favorite Commemorative design, bought at the local flea market. 

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Love that Strong reverse...impressive coin friend...

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Fun thread leeg. Love the OKLA counterstamped Stone Mountain.

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Thanks all.

Love sharing the early commemorative history.

Why don't you fellow history buff's on this series let me know what coin you would like to know more about.

Here is a cool piece around the Bay Bridge:

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1936-S Bay Bridge Half With Documentation As One of First Hundred Struck. An uncertified example of the Bay Bridge half (our estimated grade MS66) with dappled green-gold toning over light silver-gray surfaces. Housed in a hard plastic case with a manila envelope bearing the number ‘85,’ explained by way of another envelope-and-letter from the Superintendent of the San Francisco Mint, a signed attestation that the accompanying coin was the 85th example of the type struck. A fascinating lot with a strong sense of history. Courtesy Heritage Auction Galleries.

Edited by leeg

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Here are some types of Lafayette dollars. I do not have the elusive 4E type but always looking. I doubt if anyone but me collects these by die differences or would want to.

Lafayette Dollars Obv.jpg

Lafayette Dollars Rev.jpg

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2 hours ago, 1946Hamm said:

Here are some types of Lafayette dollars. I do not have the elusive 4E type but always looking. I doubt if anyone but me collects these by die differences or would want to.

Lafayette Dollars Obv.jpg

Lafayette Dollars Rev.jpg

 

Wow! Super Nice. Can I put the images in my book? If so, let me know the credit you want.

When I worked at DGS we had a 4E come in and I was super excited to have encapsulated it.

A while back I found a 1900 Paris Exposition Catalog, 11x17, that had images of the event. That is in my book also.

Enjoy

 

Edited by leeg
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