Worth saving?
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If you want the foreign coins identified, post a group pic of obverses and reverses. I or someone else will tell you what they are. I love doing that stuff.

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@Conder101, Thanks, that’s very helpful!  I’ll definitely check out abebooks.  That said, I do have a 2003 Red Book: which says: 

"Lincoln Type, Wheat Ears Reverse 1909-1958...
Variety 1 - Bronze 1909-1942, 1944-1958...
Variety 2 - Zinc-coated Steel 1943, Only".

There are no D or S 1939 wheat cents but rumor has it 1950 D is worth looking for, too...

Gold state quarter = face value. (thumbsu

What would you do with Canadian common?  What is “800 fine” silver and what are US silver dimes & Qs, in comparison?

Mexican probably common & pretty much worthless.  (thumbsu

Working on other foreign pics...

Edited by d7716045

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23 hours ago, JKK said:

If you want the foreign coins identified, post a group pic of obverses and reverses. I or someone else will tell you what they are. I love doing that stuff.

Thanks!

Working on individual foreign pics...Not sure I can get a quality group pic but will try.

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OK, Here’s an attempt at a group pic...Sometimes, it’s difficult for this newbie, to tell obverse from reverse, so be gentle.  That said, what type of magnification do you all use to see the small coins?

FWIW, I noticed I have some more Canadian coins, here. 
I have individuals, if needed.

AA57100E-4D75-433A-B0E0-A0B0085DCA34.jpeg

4F1BBA61-82D6-4084-96B7-7F433F6069B2.jpeg

Edited by d7716045

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Actually, the difficulty is the darker copper, on which I can see only limited details due to the way the lighting doesn't hit it. But the reverses help. I'll do my best here:

Left column: looks like a New Zealand penny circa 1940s, unidentifiable, Canadian cent from the 1910s, 50 centavo or centimo from Latin America circa 1930-50, Nazi zinc 10rpf, modern Bahamian small change piece, Canadian cent looks like 1932, circa 1950 West German 10pf, unidentifiable, what might be a fairly recent Dutch cent.

Middle column: old drilled UK penny circa 1880s, modern Israeli 1/2 shekel, Vichy French VFr2 (can't you just feel the fascism radiating from that evil thing?), 1939 UK shilling (that's part silver, pretty sure), post-WWII Italian ItL50, very nice Mussolini era 20 centesimi (want to sell it?), I think somewhere in Central America, Dutch 10c (can't tell if silver; might be).

Right column: slips my mind if that's a UK 10 pence or Australian, 10 nuppence, 50 nuppence, two nuppence, five nuppence, two more minimal value modern UK coins, I believe NZ 1974 1c. Nuppence is my term for modern UK pence post-decimalization that as a general rule aren't big collectors' items.

A collection of modest but not negligible value, with a couple nice pieces. Always fun to look at.

Oh, and for magnification, part of it is about lighting, but when I look at them in hand I use a 5x loupe. If that isn't good enough, a coin microscope will do. Unfortunately I'm not good at photography at all, so I don't have any intelligent guidance there.

.800 fine silver is 80%. Rest is copper. US silver coins, except for the war nickels, I believe are/were 89% Ag, the rest copper. The UK used to mint its silver coins in sterling (92.5% Ag). When they say 'fine', they do mean the basic percentage, but also how pure it is. Not a big factor on .800, as we know the rest is not silver, but on modern bullion, some people make a big deal over four nines vs. three.

Edited by JKK

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Here's a link to a sight I use for melt value.  I'll link to the Canadian section but it also has US and Mexico sections.  Top chart is modern date, little value stuff, scroll down to get the the pre '67 Canadian coins.  It gives me a starting point for the minimum I would expect to get for silver content coins.

http://www.coinflation.com/canada/

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NGC's world coin value guide might be helpful for you.  Now that you know what country a lot of these are from.  The top right is a Great Britain 2 shilling.  But for some reason they refer to it as a florin, and that's what you will find it under in the value guide.  I couldn't tell the date from the picture, but the first year they started that design was 1953.  Which was after they stopped making them out of silver.

https://www.ngccoin.com/price-guide/world/

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15 hours ago, d7716045 said:

What is “800 fine” silver and what are US silver dimes & Qs, in comparison?

Fineness is expressed as so many parts per thousand.  Canadian silver after 1920 through 1967 is 800 parts per thousand or 800 fine.  Could also be expressed as 80% silver.  US silver coins are 900 fine silver or 90% silver

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On 10/14/2018 at 12:37 PM, JKK said:

Actually, the difficulty is the darker copper, on which I can see only limited details due to the way the lighting doesn't hit it. But the reverses help. I'll do my best here:

Left column: looks like a New Zealand penny circa 1940s, unidentifiable, Canadian cent from the 1910s, 50 centavo or centimo from Latin America circa 1930-50, Nazi zinc 10rpf, modern Bahamian small change piece, Canadian cent looks like 1932, circa 1950 West German 10pf, unidentifiable, what might be a fairly recent Dutch cent.

Middle column: old drilled UK penny circa 1880s, modern Israeli 1/2 shekel, Vichy French VFr2 (can't you just feel the fascism radiating from that evil thing?), 1939 UK shilling (that's part silver, pretty sure), post-WWII Italian ItL50, very nice Mussolini era 20 centesimi (want to sell it?), I think somewhere in Central America, Dutch 10c (can't tell if silver; might be).

Right column: slips my mind if that's a UK 10 pence or Australian, 10 nuppence, 50 nuppence, two nuppence, five nuppence, two more minimal value modern UK coins, I believe NZ 1974 1c. Nuppence is my term for modern UK pence post-decimalization that as a general rule aren't big collectors' items.

A collection of modest but not negligible value, with a couple nice pieces. Always fun to look at.

Oh, and for magnification, part of it is about lighting, but when I look at them in hand I use a 5x loupe. If that isn't good enough, a coin microscope will do. Unfortunately I'm not good at photography at all, so I don't have any intelligent guidance there.

.800 fine silver is 80%. Rest is copper. US silver coins, except for the war nickels, I believe are/were 89% Ag, the rest copper. The UK used to mint its silver coins in sterling (92.5% Ag). When they say 'fine', they do mean the basic percentage, but also how pure it is. Not a big factor on .800, as we know the rest is not silver, but on modern bullion, some people make a big deal over four nines vs. three.

Wow...Thanks for that, I appreciate it! 

FWIW: Left column: New Zealand penny is 1941, unidentifiable (see pics below), Canadian cent is from 1906, 50 centimo from Latin America is from 1985, Nazi zinc 10rpf is from 1941, modern Bahamian small change piece is from 1974, Canadian cent Is from 1929, circa 1950 West German i0pf has a “5” on reverse, unidentifiable (see pics) and what might be a fairly recent Dutch cent (see pics) is from 1965.

Middle column:  “I think somewhere in Central America,” is 1929 Quatemala 10 centavos.  Dutch 10c is from 1951, very nice Mussolini era 20 centesimi, I probably want to hold to...is it worth getting graded?

Right column:  “Slips my mind...” see pics below, “I believe NZ 1974 1c” is Bermuda.

That said, thanks for the info on magnification and .800 fine.

7E319F09-7B8A-477B-BF14-E4A0012CEDC8.jpeg

EF5BB1AD-3160-4E78-913F-FB1F99CFC694.jpeg

D948E244-6FB3-4A15-BCC2-467F2FEFDABB.jpeg

0E650396-CADE-40DE-BCB6-3F46D38D4AC9.jpeg

87602454-3E88-4CBE-92F6-DD96383063DD.jpeg

C2751999-1C05-4268-A3CF-6698911847D6.jpeg

9B5C422A-8225-4920-AABE-2FEA048FEA03.jpeg

01AD6677-B7DA-4969-9797-EC18744A3302.jpeg

Edited by d7716045

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On 10/14/2018 at 8:32 PM, Lancek said:

Here's a link to a sight I use for melt value.  I'll link to the Canadian section but it also has US and Mexico sections.  Top chart is modern date, little value stuff, scroll down to get the the pre '67 Canadian coins.  It gives me a starting point for the minimum I would expect to get for silver content coins.

http://www.coinflation.com/canada/

 

On 10/14/2018 at 8:53 PM, Lancek said:

NGC's world coin value guide might be helpful for you.  Now that you know what country a lot of these are from.  The top right is a Great Britain 2 shilling.  But for some reason they refer to it as a florin, and that's what you will find it under in the value guide.  I couldn't tell the date from the picture, but the first year they started that design was 1953.  Which was after they stopped making them out of silver.

https://www.ngccoin.com/price-guide/world/

Thanks, those links are very helpful!  

How do you decide, which coins you exchange, for melt value and where; instead of trying to sell?

That said and FWIW, TDBank has a fee-free foreign money exchange program.

Edited by d7716045

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On 10/15/2018 at 2:11 AM, Conder101 said:

Fineness is expressed as so many parts per thousand.  Canadian silver after 1920 through 1967 is 800 parts per thousand or 800 fine.  Could also be expressed as 80% silver.  US silver coins are 900 fine silver or 90% silver

Thanks, appreciate ya!

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New ones, blown up rather comprehensively (nice work):

Italian 1866-M 10 centesimi, pretty beat up

Finnish 1965 1 penni, nice shape

Swiss 1962-B 1 rappen, good shape

UK 1958 florin, as another poster identified who evidently has a better memory than me for British reverses; fair shape

I'm not aware that any of them are greatly valuable. The Italian piece, in much better condition, might be a bit of a standout, but unfortunately it's pretty rough.

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10 hours ago, d7716045 said:

 

How do you decide, which coins you exchange, for melt value and where; instead of trying to sell?

Not sure I'm the best person to answer that. I got into coins as a way to invest in silver.  And since prices haven't come up yet, I haven't done much selling.  Check with some local coin dealers.  A lot of people buy common date low grade coins just for the silver value.  Most dealers will have a pile of them somewhere.  They should buy from you at melt and sell to other people at a couple bucks over spot silver price.  Sometimes they might offer less if they feel like silver is headed down.  But you should still get more than face value for the stuff.

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On 10/17/2018 at 11:58 PM, d7716045 said:

hat said and FWIW, TDBank has a fee-free foreign money exchange program.

Usually foreign exchange places won't take coinage.  Too heavy and too low value to ship back to the central bank for redemption.

 

You may also get less than melt for silver that isn't 90%, sterling, or 999 fine.  Higher refining costs

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14 hours ago, Conder101 said:

Usually foreign exchange places won't take coinage.  Too heavy and too low value to ship back to the central bank for redemption.

 

You may also get less than melt for silver that isn't 90%, sterling, or 999 fine.  Higher refining costs

Thanks!
FWIW: I specifically asked TD about exchanging Canadian coins and they said "yes", as well as, to my surprise, saying I can deposit them.

How do you decide, which coins to exchange, for melt value; instead of trying to sell?
Where do you get melt value, coin dealers??

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4 minutes ago, d7716045 said:


Where do you get melt value, coin dealers??

Actually, our hosts have provided a handy page RIGHT HERE

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12 minutes ago, Just Bob said:

Actually, our hosts have provided a handy page RIGHT HERE

Thanks, that's very helpful!
To clarify, I meant where do you exchange the coins for $, at current melt value prices?

Edited by d7716045

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50 minutes ago, d7716045 said:

Thanks, that's very helpful!
To clarify, I meant where do you exchange the coins for $, at current melt value prices?

Most coin dealers will pay you close to melt. Most precious metal dealers will pay about the same.

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52 minutes ago, JKK said:

Most coin dealers will pay you close to melt. Most precious metal dealers will pay about the same.

Great, thanks!

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Hello all,

Next up...
Worth saving, selling and/or spending, for face value?
Or what would you recommend a non-dealer, potential collector, do with these coins?
FWIW: I have individual pics of some, and I can take more individual pics, if needed.

Nickels: Circulated
1913-1938 Indian head
1943-1945 Wartime
494374848_silvernickels.thumb.jpg.f6ddaea668a71d9119634a82240b2f7b.jpg

Dimes: Circulated
1916-1945 Mercury
1946-1964 Roosevelt
268073606_silverdimes.thumb.jpg.b398980732b637d9c5a9b4eb3b33a5a8.jpg

Quarters: Circulated
1932-1964 Washington
2016502031_silverquarters.thumb.jpg.1738d8c933d476820f104bd002bf5550.jpg

Half Dollars: Circulated
1916-1947 Liberty
1948-1963 Franklin
1964-1969 Kennedy
2100816852_silverhalfdollars.thumb.jpg.73798ff916c60deadcd8366f225d0621.jpg

Silver Dollars: Circulated
1878-1921 Morgan
1922, ‘23 ‘25 Peace
1783986806_silverdollars.thumb.jpg.a145d7ef6b301b1de75127344a890ca7.jpg

Silver Dollars: Commemorative sets
1921 Morgan & 1935 Peace
1997 American Eagle
1811062356_silverdollars2.thumb.jpg.247ee32a4bbb1211256dbedf441410d1.jpg

163156878_silverdollars1997ASE.thumb.jpg.a02c36fd1a803dfa213c8e7d50899bc4.jpg

Edited by d7716045

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That's the basis of a coin collection. I see not one single solitary coin I would spend for face value.

All the Buffs, if you can read the dates, are worth more than face. Some potentially significantly more. I would go through them all, especially those before 1930.

All the wartime Jeffs are about 35% silver, so at the very least about 85% the melt value of a Merc or Rosey. Nice ones, I'd pull out--look for good detail on Monticello and light wear.

Most of the Roseys are probably not worth much above melt, but real nice ones I'd think about pulling out, especially earlier. Mercs prior to the WWII years have a better chance of value. In both cases, look for good detail on the reverse center bands and vertical lines (fasces on the Mercs, torch on the Roseys). In any case, all 1964 and before are silver, worth neighborhood of a buck just for showing up.

Quarters: a couple of the early 30s dates are very valuable. All are worth about two-fiftyish just for existing, but I'd pick out nicer ones. Look for the cross-hatchy feather pattern on the eagle to show some detail.

Walkers, around $5 for melt, but same guidance: pick out nicer ones, older ones, and especially nice older ones. I look for detail on Liberty's breastpiece. WWII years are pretty common. Most of the Franks and 1964 JFKs will be about the same, melt, but I'd look at earlier Franks with nice bell detail. 65-70 JFKs are 40% AG, so figure worth about $2ish for melt. Have to be uncirculated or close to it in order to get any sort of premium.

Silver dollars: always get a premium, so do not just let them go for melt. I'd look those ever very carefully. 1921 Morgans are pretty common, might save the nicest one from each mint (look close; the D and S are dinky tiny).

The Eag is a one-ounce bullion coin. There are a couple of semi-scarce years. I don't collect them so I don't know which.

Your best bet is if you have a local friend who is an experienced numismatist to help you go through them. If you lived in Portland, I'd help you out. Dealers' offers will vary in reasonableness, but you won't consistently get quotes over the phone--they will have to see the collection, and take time with it, to make you an offer. If you go that route, I'd research local dealers to see which have the best rep.

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20 hours ago, JKK said:

That's the basis of a coin collection. I see not one single solitary coin I would spend for face value.

All the Buffs, if you can read the dates, are worth more than face. Some potentially significantly more. I would go through them all, especially those before 1930.

All the wartime Jeffs are about 35% silver, so at the very least about 85% the melt value of a Merc or Rosey. Nice ones, I'd pull out--look for good detail on Monticello and light wear.

Most of the Roseys are probably not worth much above melt, but real nice ones I'd think about pulling out, especially earlier. Mercs prior to the WWII years have a better chance of value. In both cases, look for good detail on the reverse center bands and vertical lines (fasces on the Mercs, torch on the Roseys). In any case, all 1964 and before are silver, worth neighborhood of a buck just for showing up.

Quarters: a couple of the early 30s dates are very valuable. All are worth about two-fiftyish just for existing, but I'd pick out nicer ones. Look for the cross-hatchy feather pattern on the eagle to show some detail.

Walkers, around $5 for melt, but same guidance: pick out nicer ones, older ones, and especially nice older ones. I look for detail on Liberty's breastpiece. WWII years are pretty common. Most of the Franks and 1964 JFKs will be about the same, melt, but I'd look at earlier Franks with nice bell detail. 65-70 JFKs are 40% AG, so figure worth about $2ish for melt. Have to be uncirculated or close to it in order to get any sort of premium.

Silver dollars: always get a premium, so do not just let them go for melt. I'd look those ever very carefully. 1921 Morgans are pretty common, might save the nicest one from each mint (look close; the D and S are dinky tiny).

The Eag is a one-ounce bullion coin. There are a couple of semi-scarce years. I don't collect them so I don't know which.

Your best bet is if you have a local friend who is an experienced numismatist to help you go through them. If you lived in Portland, I'd help you out. Dealers' offers will vary in reasonableness, but you won't consistently get quotes over the phone--they will have to see the collection, and take time with it, to make you an offer. If you go that route, I'd research local dealers to see which have the best rep.

Wow, THANKS!  That’s extremely helpful!!! Looks like I’ve got some work, to do!  Nope, not in Portland but appreciate, ya! (thumbsu  FWIW: I do know one coin dealer, locally, albeit not very well but probably a good place to start.  That said, what should I expect to pay, an experienced numismatist or coin dealer, for help going through them?

Edited by d7716045

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Some dealers charge a fee (probably varies by location). Some charge one, but waive it if you sell the coins to them. Some don't charge one, then after you leave without selling it to them, sit there passive aggressively whining about the injustice. A collection like that should not take more than a couple hours to go through.

I'd break up the collection into pieces. In my experience, the more enormous the mound of coins, the more of a discount the dealers decide they are due.

Want to know what I'd do? At first, leave the dimes and up home. I'd take the nickels, silver Jeff and Buff, to three different dealers and ask them what they would pay. Watch to see if they single out any of the coins individually. If they say there's a fee to go through them, thank them politely and take the nickels with you to the next place. Also see if they put the offer in writing (a positive if they do). Obviously, don't tell any of them that you are showing the coins to other dealers.

See, one of the ways dealers make money is by doing most of that singling-out later on, after they have acquired the coins for a bulk price (for example, just below melt for the silver Jeffs, maybe twenty cents for the Buffs). Most get sent to a metal aggregator or put out in trays to sell for a modest premium over melt (if precious); non-precious get put in a bulk tray at so much apiece. And of course those the dealer later singles out as premium coins get put into flips, graded, and priced. So: all of them will bring some profit, and some will bring major profit. At your expense.

Thus, if the dealer at least points out a few of the nicer coins and offers you more than a bulk price for them, that's a strong positive. If none do, well, then none did. My point is that the nickels, by themselves, represent a tiny percentage of the overall hoard, and not really enough for someone to charge you an hourly rate for. Thus, you can judge the different dealers by how they handle this small amount, and that may indicate who will get to look at a much larger amount (don't tell them that exists; you want to see how they treat you when they think you have very little).

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14 hours ago, d7716045 said:

1964

Aww. I was going to make you an offer for it, but I already have a '64.

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15 hours ago, JKK said:

Some dealers charge a fee (probably varies by location). Some charge one, but waive it if you sell the coins to them. Some don't charge one, then after you leave without selling it to them, sit there passive aggressively whining about the injustice. A collection like that should not take more than a couple hours to go through.

I'd break up the collection into pieces. In my experience, the more enormous the mound of coins, the more of a discount the dealers decide they are due.

Want to know what I'd do? At first, leave the dimes and up home. I'd take the nickels, silver Jeff and Buff, to three different dealers and ask them what they would pay. Watch to see if they single out any of the coins individually. If they say there's a fee to go through them, thank them politely and take the nickels with you to the next place. Also see if they put the offer in writing (a positive if they do). Obviously, don't tell any of them that you are showing the coins to other dealers. 

See, one of the ways dealers make money is by doing most of that singling-out later on, after they have acquired the coins for a bulk price (for example, just below melt for the silver Jeffs, maybe twenty cents for the Buffs). Most get sent to a metal aggregator or put out in trays to sell for a modest premium over melt (if precious); non-precious get put in a bulk tray at so much apiece. And of course those the dealer later singles out as premium coins get put into flips, graded, and priced. So: all of them will bring some profit, and some will bring major profit. At your expense.

Thus, if the dealer at least points out a few of the nicer coins and offers you more than a bulk price for them, that's a strong positive. If none do, well, then none did. My point is that the nickels, by themselves, represent a tiny percentage of the overall hoard, and not really enough for someone to charge you an hourly rate for. Thus, you can judge the different dealers by how they handle this small amount, and that may indicate who will get to look at a much larger amount (don't tell them that exists; you want to see how they treat you when they think you have very little). 

Thanks!
Again, extremely helpful!
Looks like, I have 3 coin dealers, near by; one of which I know but not well enough to know, if he's one of the passive aggressive whiners. :wink:

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1 hour ago, Just Bob said:

Aww. I was going to make you an offer for it, but I already have a '64.

Darn it! :wink:
How much would you value the '64 at?

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You won't know which are the passive aggressive whiners because the PAWing will begin only after you leave without selling them the coins, so that won't end up mattering to you. Really, comes down to business is business. Their goal is to offer you the least money. Your goal is to get the most money. Since you ultimately hold the control, you end up deciding who gets the business.

I would not say price is the only determinant, but the world is full of smiling, wonderful-seeming people who make livings getting lower prices through smiles. They stand out more in the coin dealer world because so many coin dealers have the social grace of iguanas.

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