is this 1958 type 1 ddo positive?
2 2

13 posts in this topic

4,028 posts

This is the DDO-001 from our hosts' Variety Plus. It is the only DDO for that year and mint mark listed on Variety Vista as well. It does not appear to match your coin.

 

.image.png.a7fb56603468a7ada0f935240a6f6886.png

As an aside, your coin has some odd reflections that are normally not seen on a business strike. It may just be the type of lighting used, but it appears to have been polished or oiled. (shrug)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2,866 posts

Sorry......I'm just not seeing any doubling either.  From what I can see, you just have a regular 1958 cent.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4,028 posts
1 hour ago, Mohawk said:

Sorry......I'm just not seeing any doubling either.  From what I can see, you just have a regular 1958 cent.

The OP sent me some closeups of the reverse.It appears to have some slight MDD on the wheat stalk stems.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2,866 posts
1 hour ago, Just Bob said:

The OP sent me some closeups of the reverse.It appears to have some slight MDD on the wheat stalk stems.

 

Ahhh......that makes sense.  I've seen MDD doubling on later 1950's Wheats before. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2,162 posts

I imagine someone will ask, so I'll take the initiative: MDD stands for master die doubling. This means that all of the working hubs and dies taken from it will repeat that doubling to varying degrees. Obviously, this makes the doubling too common to bring any premium. A good example is the doubling seen along Liberty's hemline and the motto IN GOD WE TRUST on all 1943 half dollar obverse dies.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4,028 posts

Um, actually I meant machine doubling damage.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2,162 posts

To a seasoned numismatist, MDD means master die doubling. For what you're describing, strike doubling is a more accurate term, because it refers to an incident which occurs at the moment of striking in a coin press. Machine doubling is too vague---which machine? I'm not saying this to be critical, but NGC uses the traditional term of strike doubling when rejecting such coins as varieties, so it would be helpful to use it in this instance, too.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4,028 posts
11 hours ago, DWLange said:

To a seasoned numismatist, MDD means master die doubling. For what you're describing, strike doubling is a more accurate term, because it refers to an incident which occurs at the moment of striking in a coin press. Machine doubling is too vague---which machine? I'm not saying this to be critical, but NGC uses the traditional term of strike doubling when rejecting such coins as varieties, so it would be helpful to use it in this instance, too.

I will be the first to admit that I am not a seasoned numismatist. The reason that I do not use the term "strike doubling" is that, according to what I have read, the doubling actually occurs after the coin has been struck, as the hammer die is retracting. That is also the reason ( again, according to what I have read) that some authors call it "post mint damage." If what I have read is wrong, then I will certainly stand corrected. 

To avoid confusion, and since this is indeed the NGC website,  I will try to remember to refer to it as "strike doubling " in the future.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2,866 posts
14 hours ago, DWLange said:

To a seasoned numismatist, MDD means master die doubling. For what you're describing, strike doubling is a more accurate term, because it refers to an incident which occurs at the moment of striking in a coin press. Machine doubling is too vague---which machine? I'm not saying this to be critical, but NGC uses the traditional term of strike doubling when rejecting such coins as varieties, so it would be helpful to use it in this instance, too.

I too will remember to use the term strike doubling in the future as well.  After all, you guys are the experts :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
648 posts
On 9/4/2018 at 9:59 AM, DWLange said:

To a seasoned numismatist, MDD means master die doubling. For what you're describing, strike doubling is a more accurate term, because it refers to an incident which occurs at the moment of striking in a coin press. Machine doubling is too vague---which machine? I'm not saying this to be critical, but NGC uses the traditional term of strike doubling when rejecting such coins as varieties, so it would be helpful to use it in this instance, too.

I was just deep studying all the different classes of doubling yesterday and totally know all about master die and hub doubling now. Does that mean I've gone from Newbie to Seasoned over night? I'm teasing! I'm teasing! Breaking up the monotony, I am. But seriously, I do feel seasoned now. Y'all should see me answering questions on FB. You'd all be proud of your grasshopper.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
2 2